T Nation

Zero-Sugar Drinks' Calories?


#1

I would like you to weigh in on the nutrition facts on the backside of zero-sugar drinks' cans..

I just can't believe that because it doesn't have any sugar in it (instead it contains sweeteners) it only has 2.4 calories / 100 ml...

Is this a scam or should I believe it?


#2

Calories come only from fats, protein, metabolizable carbohydrates, or alcohol, so yes it’s entirely possible.

I would doubt that a significant percentage of commercially sold products contain more calories than claimed. There would be no need to do so, and FTC fines could be substantial.


#3

[quote]Bill Roberts wrote:
Calories come only from fats, protein, metabolizable carbohydrates, or alcohol, so yes it’s entirely possible.

I would doubt that a significant percentage of commercially sold products contain more calories than claimed. There would be no need to do so, and FTC fines could be substantial.[/quote]
I thank you for your quick and logical response.

However, don’t you think that what I just described would indeed have a need to be done? Because more people would buy it, especially obese people, thinking they could literally drink as many as they want because the drink would only contain some 8 calories per 250 ml.

I very much hope that this thing is strictly regulated, otherwise my diet is… screwed.


#4

I don’t think it would have a need to be done because it’s completely easy to make a zero calorie drink that tastes as sweet as desired and tastes very good.

The reason, as I understand it, for the drinks with for example 2.4 calories is that, ironically, after Coca-Cola and Pepsi cheapened and worsened the taste of their products by switching to high fructose corn syrup as their sweetener, with time some came to take the taste of corn syrup as being what a sweetened drink should taste like.

That aspect of taste, compared to cane sugar taste, is not from the sugar, but from impurities from the corn.

It was found how to concentrate that off-taste, so that only a tiny amount of corn derived sugar is needed to give the full corn-syrup taste, when combined with artificial sweeteners.

So no, no need. The obese can get the corn syrup taste they desire from only a very small number of calories thanks to the new technology.


#5

I agree with everything Bill said. I would also like to add that it’s much better for you to stick to water.