Zero Calories Soft Drinks Bad for You?

[quote]chillain wrote:

[quote]rich44 wrote:
They raise insulin levels because of the sweet taste. It makes the body think that sugar has been ingested and the body increases insulin to do it’s job. [/quote]

Quite sure this actually isn’t the case.

Hoping anonym will drop back in and comment.

[/quote]

Just thinking about food or smelling it will increase insulin. It’s probably a matter of how much and how long.

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:
Just thinking about food or smelling it will increase insulin. It’s probably a matter of how much and how long.[/quote]

I would also question this claim.

Yes, I know the mind is a powerful thing and the power of suggestion and all but I kinda doubt that our endocrine system is so easily “fooled” by such common, everyday occurrences.

[quote]chillain wrote:

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:
Just thinking about food or smelling it will increase insulin. It’s probably a matter of how much and how long.[/quote]

I would also question this claim.

Yes, I know the mind is a powerful thing and the power of suggestion and all but I kinda doubt that our endocrine system is so easily “fooled” by such common, everyday occurrences.

[/quote]

The glands in your mouth will also release saliva. Why do you think insulin is a stretch? When you think about food, your body preps for eating.

The insulin release is actually a reason thinking about (or smelling) food will make you physiologically hungry.

google “cephalic phase insulin response”.

[quote]chillain wrote:

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:
Just thinking about food or smelling it will increase insulin. It’s probably a matter of how much and how long.[/quote]

I would also question this claim.

Yes, I know the mind is a powerful thing and the power of suggestion and all but I kinda doubt that our endocrine system is so easily “fooled” by such common, everyday occurrences.

[/quote]

Personally, I don’t think it’s too much of a stretch. Our sense of smell is a chemical smell and digestion is a chemical process. I don’t see why the scent of food, meaning that food is near and available to eat, wouldn’t signal our bodies to think “time to eat!” (on an evolutionary level.)

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:
The glands in your mouth will also release saliva. Why do you think insulin is a stretch? When you think about food, your body preps for eating.

The insulin release is actually a reason thinking about (or smelling) food will make you physiologically hungry.

google “cephalic phase insulin response”.[/quote]

[quote]rrjc5488 wrote:
Personally, I don’t think it’s too much of a stretch. Our sense of smell is a chemical smell and digestion is a chemical process. I don’t see why the scent of food, meaning that food is near and available to eat, wouldn’t signal our bodies to think “time to eat!” (on an evolutionary level.)[/quote]

I think its a stretch to equate the salivary/amylase response with an endocrine response governing intracellular uptake. Somewhat similarly, I wouldn’t expect the mere smell of donuts to trigger bile release (in anticipation of all that fatty goodness).

Basically, I’m assuming different levels/degrees of response and I just don’t see insulin/blood glucose regulation as so easily “fooled” by smells, especially in place of any actual ingestion.

Regardless, thanks for the google refernce and I’m once again hoping anonym might drop back in…

(edited)

[quote]chillain wrote:
Regardless, thanks for the google refernce and I’m once again hoping anonym might drop back in…[/quote]

Not sure how much insight I can offer, but I have been following the thread and wanted to comment a little on the article and study posted as well as the topic in general. This thread is probably a better use of my time than the shitstorms in BSL, but it’s finals and the latter are a decent distraction. I’ll try and throw something up tonight.

I’ve noticed Bill Roberts posting in this forum on occasion… he’d be a better contributor than I would on this sort of thing so hopefully he catches wind of this discussion.

[quote]chillain wrote:
I think its a stretch to equate the salivary/amylase response with an endocrine response governing intracellular uptake. [/quote]
I don’t think it’s that much of a stretch to imagine that an endocrine gland can behave like an exocrine gland, physiologically responding to an activity it’s been trained to do every day.

Searching pubmed for “cephalic phase insulin” lead me to this:

Cliff notes: Subjects tasted sugar water and spat it out. Slin went up.

Seems like cephalic phase insulin release is real. From personal experience, it certainly feels like eating a snack lowers my blood sugar. Since I’m used to three huge meals, I guess my body prepares for the incoming sugar by excreting insulin.

I also start salivating at the thought of tasty food or, on a more disgusting note, a few minutes before I feel like throwing up. The latter is a response to protect the teeth and has helped me out a few times since I learned why that was. The body is smart.

[quote]kakno wrote:

[quote]chillain wrote:
I think its a stretch to equate the salivary/amylase response with an endocrine response governing intracellular uptake. [/quote]
I don’t think it’s that much of a stretch to imagine that an endocrine gland can behave like an exocrine gland, physiologically responding to an activity it’s been trained to do every day.

Searching pubmed for “cephalic phase insulin” lead me to this:

Cliff notes: Subjects tasted sugar water and spat it out. Slin went up.

Seems like cephalic phase insulin release is real. From personal experience, it certainly feels like eating a snack lowers my blood sugar. Since I’m used to three huge meals, I guess my body prepares for the incoming sugar by excreting insulin.

I also start salivating at the thought of tasty food or, on a more disgusting note, a few minutes before I feel like throwing up. The latter is a response to protect the teeth and has helped me out a few times since I learned why that was. The body is smart.[/quote]
Not sure how you can equate smelling to actually taking in the sugar into your mouth. Those are very different physiological qualities

Plenty of guys diet to contests leanness drinking diet pop on the regular. So no it’s not elevating insulin to the point of hindering fat loss. Which is not a large spike. I have seen no data ever that indicate fake sweeteners signal insulin release. In rats it did a very slight amount but the amount ingested was insane

[quote]ryanbCXG wrote:

[quote]kakno wrote:

[quote]chillain wrote:
I think its a stretch to equate the salivary/amylase response with an endocrine response governing intracellular uptake. [/quote]
I don’t think it’s that much of a stretch to imagine that an endocrine gland can behave like an exocrine gland, physiologically responding to an activity it’s been trained to do every day.

Searching pubmed for “cephalic phase insulin” lead me to this:

Cliff notes: Subjects tasted sugar water and spat it out. Slin went up.

Seems like cephalic phase insulin release is real. From personal experience, it certainly feels like eating a snack lowers my blood sugar. Since I’m used to three huge meals, I guess my body prepares for the incoming sugar by excreting insulin.

I also start salivating at the thought of tasty food or, on a more disgusting note, a few minutes before I feel like throwing up. The latter is a response to protect the teeth and has helped me out a few times since I learned why that was. The body is smart.[/quote]
Not sure how you can equate smelling to actually taking in the sugar into your mouth. Those are very different physiological qualities

Plenty of guys diet to contests leanness drinking diet pop on the regular. So no it’s not elevating insulin to the point of hindering fat loss. Which is not a large spike. I have seen no data ever that indicate fake sweeteners signal insulin release. In rats it did a very slight amount but the amount ingested was insane [/quote]

Or that when insulin raised in the absence of elevated blood sugar your body figures it out and corrects the problem.

Many hormones are effected by thought. adrenalin, cortisol, even testosterone.

You can literally believe yourself dead. The brain is a physical system. It is part of the body like any other. People build up the belief that self and thought and mind are separate from the body, but they all take place as part of a physical system.

Personally, I have noticed whenever I stop drinking diet coke, or diet soda in general, and just drink water instead I tend to lean out a little bit more. Nothing crazy like 4 pack to 6 pack but my abs just become a little more defined.

[quote]BoybodyKellish wrote:
Personally, I have noticed whenever I stop drinking diet coke, or diet soda in general, and just drink water instead I tend to lean out a little bit more. Nothing crazy like 4 pack to 6 pack but my abs just become a little more defined.[/quote]

Less gas/bloat from the carbonation and you are probably urinating more.

[quote]kakno wrote:

[quote]chillain wrote:
I think its a stretch to equate the salivary/amylase response with an endocrine response governing intracellular uptake. [/quote]
I don’t think it’s that much of a stretch to imagine that an endocrine gland can behave like an exocrine gland, physiologically responding to an activity it’s been trained to do every day.

Searching pubmed for “cephalic phase insulin” lead me to this:

Cliff notes: Subjects tasted sugar water and spat it out. Slin went up.

Seems like cephalic phase insulin release is real. From personal experience, it certainly feels like eating a snack lowers my blood sugar. Since I’m used to three huge meals, I guess my body prepares for the incoming sugar by excreting insulin.

I also start salivating at the thought of tasty food or, on a more disgusting note, a few minutes before I feel like throwing up. The latter is a response to protect the teeth and has helped me out a few times since I learned why that was. The body is smart.[/quote]

This topic has been raised many times since my time on T-Nation, I think I first answered it in 2006…

The above study is one of the only ones that show a cephalic phase insulin release to non-caloric artificial sweeteners (saccharine). All others that I know have shown no effect on CPIR or food intake, same thing for literature reviews on the topic.

The current weight of evidence favors the notion that artificial sweeteners are insulin secretion neutral, which is good considering they are currently recommended for diabetics by the ADA…which would mess up sugar control if it weren’t the case.

Good day,
AlexH

[quote]ryanbCXG wrote:

[quote]kakno wrote:
I don’t think it’s that much of a stretch to imagine that an endocrine gland can behave like an exocrine gland, physiologically responding to an activity it’s been trained to do every day.

Searching pubmed for “cephalic phase insulin” lead me to this:

Cliff notes: Subjects tasted sugar water and spat it out. Slin went up.

Seems like cephalic phase insulin release is real. From personal experience, it certainly feels like eating a snack lowers my blood sugar. Since I’m used to three huge meals, I guess my body prepares for the incoming sugar by excreting insulin.

I also start salivating at the thought of tasty food or, on a more disgusting note, a few minutes before I feel like throwing up. The latter is a response to protect the teeth and has helped me out a few times since I learned why that was. The body is smart.[/quote]
Not sure how you can equate smelling to actually taking in the sugar into your mouth. Those are very different physiological qualities
[/quote]

  1. I didn’t.
  2. At the cellular level, taste and smell are ridiculously similar processes. Maybe you should read a biology book :wink:

This. No one is saying it ends there. Even if they do promote insulin release, blood sugar should eventually return back to normal. I just jumped in to say that the cephalic phase is very real.