T Nation

You're Old, Quit Lifting Heavy Things


#1

What do you guys think of this? They are almost telling people to not weightlift after a certain age...is there merit here?

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9805431/


#2

you mean like sylvester stallone, doing another Rocky Movie at age 59.


#3

I think that's the kind of crap mentality that has made obesity the number 1 preventable disease in this country.

Look who they interviewed for this article; DOCTORS. In general doctors are the most out of shape people in America. When do most people go see a doctor? After they think they have a problem. They are trained to treat disease not to prevent it.

I'm 48 y/o and have been athletic my whole life. I train harder now and am in better shape than I was 20 yrs ago. I've had injuries since being over 40 but have healed just fine and probably because I'm in shape.

I believe it's like anything else in life if you think you can you're right and if you think you can't you're right again.

So in conclusion I say BULSHIT! I'll keep lifting until I can't lift anymore not because some lame as doctor tells me not to.

That's my 2 cents.

AssBuster


#4

I'd tell'm; just try to stop me.


#5

What a load of horse shit!! It's no damn wonder that bowling and video games have become the sports of choice for a huge portion of the population which has lead to a damn obesity epidemic.

Study after study indicates that people who workout on a regular basis AND who combine heavy weight work with reasonable aerobic work have better health. Period!! More muscle mass. More bone mass. Better metabolism. Better sleep patterns. Better sex lives. Better mental capacity. Longer life spans. The list goes on.

Dont let some damn MD or worse yet some MSNBC reporter convince you that you will be better off walking Fi Fi in the park than hitting the gym.

I just turned 53 and I dont think I have ever felt better or been healthier. I have always worked out and stayed active. I also try to find outside work that is practical and not specific to the weight room. Split wood. Shovel snow, gravel, sand, dirt, horseshit, whatever. Buck bales. Move rocks. Dig post holes. Do all those things on the week-end after working out all week, eat a good healthy diet and I guarantee you'll feel better, look better, sleep better and wake up with a woodie a cat can't scratch.

And always remember, "You rust out before you wear out."

My 2 bits.

Jimbob


#6

This is so fucking true but so forgotten. I plan on breaking myself first before giving into age. Gray hair and wrinkles? Bring it.


#7

Lift hard or die trying.


#8

Are you really stronger in your 40 's, than your twenties?
Im not trying to be insulting , but I d day most were stronger in their 20's

You may have knowlegde and decipline while your in your 40 ,but how can anyone recover as quickly as they did in their 20s.

When I was in my early twenties, during summer vacation , I d work all day outside , workout and drink at night. I still made some progress cause I was only twenty.At the time , my body could recover from anything.

I wish I had the good sense to study , lift and eat ,but I didnt.
If I had the same life style I did as I did in my 20 , Id be in a catabolic state.
Id say most are stronger in their 20's

As for the article , it seems its just telling people to be more well rounded in their choice of physical activies.
I ve often noted , that when T-Nation asks the latest guru , whats the one thing that everyone should be doing and no one is doing is more stretching or yoga.The is more ot exercise then just weights

Over the years , many knowledgeable lifters have ended their careers using max weights. This is a fact. We all know this
It seems that the article is simply saying there are other ways to stay healthy


#9

Simply stated, this is pure bullshit.


#10

Actually there is some merit to what it says. It says "in weekend warrior fashion" which means doing nothing all week and then working out as hard as you can on the weekends. So I take it that would mean that you should just be in shape if you're going to do something very strenuous. As for the rest of it, I agree, bullshit.


#11

Their is a differnce between being stonger and being able to recover at a more rapid rate.


#12

I think it more applies to those who are not in shape and are older who are seeking to get in shape. It doesn't mean they shouldn't lift or do intense exercise. They should just work up to it slowly. Slower then some teenager who starts lifting for the the first time. For those who've already been training hard their whole lives, I see no reason to stop.


#13

You rule. I vote we put JimBob and his boner on Mt. Rushmore.

Dont let some damn MD or worse yet some MSNBC reporter convince you that you will be better off walking Fi Fi in the park than hitting the gym.

I just turned 53 and I dont think I have ever felt better or been healthier. I have always worked out and stayed active. I also try to find outside work that is practical and not specific to the weight room. Split wood. Shovel snow, gravel, sand, dirt, horseshit, whatever. Buck bales. Move rocks. Dig post holes. Do all those things on the week-end after working out all week, eat a good healthy diet and I guarantee you'll feel better, look better, sleep better and wake up with a woodie a cat can't scratch.

And always remember, "You rust out before you wear out."

My 2 bits.

Jimbob


#14

No offense but if these are your views why are you on T-Nation? You sound like the exception to the average T-Man/Vixen. I can't speak for everyone here but I think the vast majority of us on T-Nation are strength athletes. Not that we don't do various other activities such as cardio activities, or recreational sports, but I think the vast majority of us are strength athletes first and most are either on or aspire to be on the extreme end of the training spectrum. That's why we're here.

I agree with you that SOME activity for the "average" person is better than no activity at all, but for me at least taking it easy isn't in my vocabulary. I am very passionate about my training. My motto is train hard or stay home.

In regards to being in better condition in my 20s vs. now in my late 40s I know for a fact that I am. I can run farther and faster than I did then. I also lift considerably more now than I did back then and my body composition is much better now. Am I gifted with superior genetics? I don't think so. Am I determined not to let old age mentality and negative thinking creep in? You bet ya. I don't feel old, act old and or think old therefore I'm not old regarless of the number of birthdays I've seen.

True enough, I could party all night and work all the next day, but I have no desire to do that any more and on the rare occasion that I have done it over the last few years; I still can do it. However, I now have more respect for my health than I did back then.

As far as recovery from injuries... The only serious injury I've had training (thank God) was last year in July. I completely separated my left shoulder while benching 360. My spotter wasn't paying attention and a collar slipped off the bar and the load suddenly shifted. I was back under the bar again in 6 weeks and back to full steam in 3 months. Not bad for an old man. And no, I don't take steroids.

So I have to say I respectfully disagree with your post.

A.B.


#15

I agree that like anything else, the more diversity you have, the better. I'm not saying its bad to do tai-chi, yoga, etc.

It just irritates me that this is the stuff that the general public is getting fed. When I found this article, it was a click away from the main MSN page. The average guy is not reading what we are reading; they are reading the stuff that this article says: You are to old to lift weights. Go do yoga or something less strenuous.

I thought we had come farther than that, with so many folks recommending that everyone over 50 needs to weightlift at least moderately to keep bone density, raise metabolism, etc. (MensHealth is good for this much at least). Apparently not.

But then I'm 21 what the hell would I know.


#16

I'm a personal trainer and I believe that the persons body adapts to whatever you give it. Have you guys ever seen movies where the old people are working out with 2lb. weights. I'd bet the farm that if they ever fall they're going to lose all ther teeth. Now think about getting up off of the floor. Now that's a full squat if I've ever seen one. The body is pretty darn heavy but was also made to move. If you want to lose the ability to move just stop lifting weight. What an ignorant article.


#17

Hey man, dont knock yourself for being 21. I'd sell my left nut to be back in my 20's again and have the knowledge and experience I have now. If the Web had been something other than spider shit when I was in my 20s I woulda, coulda been there (here)!! You knew enough to call "bullshit" on an article that was mostly bullshit and you were able to do that because of what you learned here and most likely other places. You have a brain and you use it. That's more that most people can say.

The real problem I have with articles like that and you can see it in the response from some people on this thread is that they imply that if you take it easy on yourself, dont push it, "act your age", etc, etc you won't have all those aches, pains, ills and problems as you age.You wont cut your life and/or your career short. The research done and the practical experience of people who are "mature" (myself included)indicates that exactly the opposite is true. If you live long enough and well enough you will get all sorts of aches and pains. Here's a quote from the article:

" As we age, experts say, it?s easier to get injured and it takes longer to heal sprains and strains. The physical changes and ailments that can come with age include loss of muscle mass, decreased bone density, diminished muscle and tendon flexibility, and joints less able to handle impact."

I dont think anybody in their 40s and 50s will disagree that it takes longer to heal but if you stay active you WILL heal and if you dont you WILL NOT heal.
The physical changes and ailments they mention are the very ones that exercise will help prevent and if you think that not exercising will prevent sprains and strains, herniated disks, sore knees, think again. If you talk to people who lead a sedentary life you find that they have more problems than non sedentary and the problems are more serious than those of us who dont know how to act our age.

My 2 bits again.

"You rust out before you wear out."

Jimbob


#18

From the article:
The highest numbers of sports-related injuries came from bicycling, basketball, baseball and running, according to the consumer report. The most common injuries come from overuse and affect knees, ankles, lower back and shoulders.

Aging can?t be avoided, but injuries can be. And doctors say that doesn?t mean all avid joggers must hang up their running shoes, or lifelong basketball players must necessarily forgo the neighborhood court ? it?s all about exercising smarter.

?The old adage 'no pain, no gain' should be less relevant as we age than when we?re younger,? Lonner said. ?It?s a matter of being educated in how to exercise appropriately and what signs to look out for when exercising, like muscle soreness and joint pain.?


First of all, weightlifting isn't mentioned in the list of the major offending athletic activities.

Where exactly are you seeing that they recommend we stop lifting, shrivel up and die? It says to exercise smarter and basically watch out for overuse injuries, not stop altogether.

What are you guys reading in(to) that article that I'm missing here?

As for taking the doctor's comments...
The statement that doctors are in the worst shape of anyone is a blanket statement and obviously not altogether true. There are plenty that are in incredibly good shape.

The statement are about what they - the doctors - are seeing in their practice, they are just talking statistics, basically, they (with the exception of Dr. Lonner) aren't giving out advice. All Dr. Lonner recomended was working smarter. I would hope that as one ages, one does get smarter about the things they enjoy.

All due respect, but why not reread the article without a "I can prove I'm just as bad-ass as any 20 year old" mindset and see what you think of it then.

Matthew


#19

I agree with Matthew - no where in the article does it say we should give up weightlifting - Kozlow did because he had a herniated disk and various other ailments and took up yoga, etc.

Good for him and he made the right decision. For the rest of us (and the doctors concur) just train smarter. Which btw is good advice.

I think we all need to bone up on our comprehension skills sometimes or actually read the article before commenting.


#20

Don't know if this has been said:

Odd Fuckin Haugen
54yo strongman still competing at elite level

please excuse the misspelling