T Nation

Your Typical Workout


#1

What's it look like?

Are some workouts sport-and-skill specific, or do you mix in bodyweight stuff or weights? How are they structured? Why do you structure them that way? Do you change it up or stay with one kind of format?


Combat Athlete Thread
'Power to the People' Program
#2

3 boxing sessions (running at the start of each session) and 3 lifting sessions per week/8 days.

Workout A:
Squat
Pause squat
Weighted chins

Workout B:
Clean and press
Rows
Close-grip bench
Bent Lat raises

Workout C:
Deadlift
High rep clean and press
Poundstone curls


#3

Depending on the work schedule, but, a typical week would be:

Tuesday/ Thursday / Saturday: Muay Thai and Kali

Monday/ Wednesday / Friday: 30 minute run / rope / bike / followed by 5-3-1 on this current cycle

Sunday: small arms training / 45-60 minute jog

I know the experts state you should not run before you lift, but, I consider conditioning second only to weapons skills. Weight training to me is used to supplement everything else, not the dominant objective. I probably committed hersey by stating that on this site.:))


#4

-3 BJJ sessions. 1 hour of technique (whatever’s being taught that day). 45min of drilling, 45min of sparring.

I drill things that link up to my game, and rarely things I’m already good at (I work those in sparring).

Sparring intensity depends on how I’m feeling. If I’m working some specific I spar light. All played by ear.

-Recently threw in a day of Judo, so I’m not dropping to my butt every time I compete.

The boring stuff:

-Run once a week, medium intensity, just keep the cardio in check.

-Lift twice.

Press/Floor press
Pullups/Rows
Squat/Deadlift

Prioritized based on weaknesses. Leg work is done explosively, and nowhere close to failure, light(er) weight. Back work is medium intensity to rack up some volume. Pressing, being my weakpoint, I hammer hard and give plenty of attention.

-Calisthenics, mobility and stretching every morning. Nothing fancy, just a set of pullups/pushups/plank/etc to work a sweat up before a shower. Takes less than 15min. Exercises vary a lot, but they tend to target body parts I feel are “weak” and/or prone to injury, say neck work, or calf raises, or grip work.


#5

[quote]LondonBoxer123 wrote:
3 boxing sessions (running at the start of each session) and 3 lifting sessions per week/8 days.

Workout A:
Squat
Pause squat
Weighted chins

Workout B:
Clean and press
Rows
Close-grip bench
Bent Lat raises

Workout C:
Deadlift
High rep clean and press
Poundstone curls
[/quote]

London - I’m actually more interested in the skillwork at the moment and how you break it up - i.e., 3 rounds of jumping rope, 5 rounds on the bag, etc. etc. etc.

Workout looks solid though.


#6

[quote]idaho wrote:
Depending on the work schedule, but, a typical week would be:

Tuesday/ Thursday / Saturday: Muay Thai and Kali
[/quote]

You too - how do you break these up? What takes precedence? When do you work on “weak points” in your skills? Do you train full speed some times, and then take rounds slower when trying to learn something new, i.e. a new combo on the bag, etc. Do you do that at the beginning, or end, of the skill session?

[quote]
Monday/ Wednesday / Friday: 30 minute run / rope / bike / followed by 5-3-1 on this current cycle

Sunday: small arms training / 45-60 minute jog

I know the experts state you should not run before you lift, but, I consider conditioning second only to weapons skills. Weight training to me is used to supplement everything else, not the dominant objective. I probably committed hersey by stating that on this site.:)) [/quote]

Not in this forum haha. I think you’d be hard pressed to find anyone with some experience who doesn’t think exactly the same way.


#7

hmmm

what passes for training for me is different
I have had to admit I cant do much.

every day LX ball PVC mobility drills
feet to head

no judo no BJJ no wrestling no rolling no tumbling

so I am reduced to lifting and some conditioning work
like most of the brotards on this site.

what I do to train-

squat 3 to 4 times a week
some kind of OH pressing 2x a week
rep ranges from 3 to 8 for primary stuffs

reps from 10 -35 for accessory work
lots of BW ladders for upper work

conditioning- jump rope, rowing machine , complexes

most sessions look like this

pvc moblity

Hanging leg Raises feet to face x Back raises
OH squat and or BB complex for activation

squat 5’s triples then doubles sets of 20 or 25 with something like 225.
dimel RDL- 2-4 sets of 20
then some upper crap -
usually limited to loaded push ups dips BHN push press or Z-press
or DB cleans
sadly pull-ups I have to limit

I lots of BB pendlay style rows and loaded pushups - probably all I can get away with for upper body

and plenty of re-pre-hab type shit that takes too long to type out.

also I fuck around with a TRX alot- and will do several rounds of stuff when I do use it.

kind of boring - but its what happens when you cant keep - training for your sport or sports


#8

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:

[quote]LondonBoxer123 wrote:
3 boxing sessions (running at the start of each session) and 3 lifting sessions per week/8 days.

Workout A:
Squat
Pause squat
Weighted chins

Workout B:
Clean and press
Rows
Close-grip bench
Bent Lat raises

Workout C:
Deadlift
High rep clean and press
Poundstone curls
[/quote]

London - I’m actually more interested in the skillwork at the moment and how you break it up - i.e., 3 rounds of jumping rope, 5 rounds on the bag, etc. etc. etc.

Workout looks solid though.[/quote]

No problem, mate.

Generally, I’m looking to get at least 25 quality rounds in when I’m in the gym, whether I’m coaching or training. That’s about 1hr40 training time. Since we do 7-9pm 3x a week, that seems about right after 20 minutes to run and warm up. Generally the run is 2 miles or so, with some hills/sprints thrown in.

Once back in the gym, I’m looking for 5 quality rounds of shadow boxing. I approach the shadow boxing by saying ‘today I’m fighting X kind of fighter’ (not out loud obviously). First round of shadow boxing I’ll obviously come out strongly behind the jab, focus on my defense and footwork, trying to build points and look for defensive weaknesses in the guy I’m ‘boxing’. All this is done with the emphasis on technique and fluidity rather than power. Next four rounds I’ll build the tempo a little to finish strong, really just by working some combinations off the jab and working through my skill-set for boxing a particular type of fighter.

If it’s a sparring day, I’ll get straight in the ring after I’ve shadow boxed, and look to do 8-10 rounds. During sparring I always try to work a particular strategy/combination/type of defense, rather than trying to ‘win’. Whatever I’m working on, two things don’t change: everything is built off a strong jab, and I always control distance. Those are the two things my style is built off, everything else is changable, so I might box on my toes, or with my weight over my front foot, or my back foot. A few weeks before a fight, I will really zero in and dominate sparring, I’ll stick with my preferred stance(weight over front foot, a la Dempsey, etc.

If it’s a non sparring day, usually after shadow boxing I will hit the heavy bag for at least 10 rounds, keeping the intensity high, treating it like an opponent, and doing much as I described above for sparring.

After that, I’ll always do some partner drills. 6-8 rounds of them.

After that, we finish with some circuits. Usually 3 rounds, 1 minute rest between them. Always involves a shit load of burpees and tuck jumps.

Once training is over, we often do ‘voluntary’ pressups, 10 x 10, limited rest, just to finish.

Let me know if you want any more detail.


#9

London - How long have you been training for? And how long did it take you to get that routine? I guess I’m wondering at what sort of level you need to be, to be concentrating on workouts like that…


#10

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:

[quote]idaho wrote:
Depending on the work schedule, but, a typical week would be:

Tuesday/ Thursday / Saturday: Muay Thai and Kali
[/quote]

You too - how do you break these up? What takes precedence? When do you work on “weak points” in your skills? Do you train full speed some times, and then take rounds slower when trying to learn something new, i.e. a new combo on the bag, etc. Do you do that at the beginning, or end, of the skill session?

[quote]
Monday/ Wednesday / Friday: 30 minute run / rope / bike / followed by 5-3-1 on this current cycle

Sunday: small arms training / 45-60 minute jog

I know the experts state you should not run before you lift, but, I consider conditioning second only to weapons skills. Weight training to me is used to supplement everything else, not the dominant objective. I probably committed hersey by stating that on this site.:)) [/quote]

Not in this forum haha. I think you’d be hard pressed to find anyone with some experience who doesn’t think exactly the same way.[/quote]

Well, to break the workout down, I will describe last night’s Training. This is typical for a Tuesday and Thursday class.

First, since I live at the Embassy complex, all my workouts are done in an informal class, that myself and two others “lead”. I have found that training third country nationals(TCN’S), it is easier to teach by the “numbers”, due to language barriers and the problem of Americans using “slang” terms.

Last night for example, I had 4 Ugandans (static guards), 4 Peruvian Marines( on detail for security jobs)4 American security contractors and 5 US Marines (MSG). This a two hour block of time,I have reserved at the “common room” of the gym. You never know who is going to show up or their skill level, since it is open to everyone.

By the “numbers” means: 1. Jab. 2. straight. 3. hook. 4. uppercut. 5. body hook. 6. overhand right. 7. left uppercut. 8. right uppercut. 10. left elbow. 11. right elbow. 12. mid-thigh kick. 13. switch kick . 14. left knee. 15. right knee. (Southpaws will reverse order)

I also use Bas Rutten’s striking CD’s in which he calls out combinations. I use the one where he has seven (3) minute rounds with one minute rest. His combinations are:

2: Jab, Straight
3. Jab, straight, hook
4. Jab, straight, hook, uppercut

example: he will call out: a 2, 3,and two knees, etc…

Last Night’s workout:

(1) round shadow boxing using the Bas Rutten CD to warm up students

(3) rounds striking and (3) rounds holding pads with the CD, all (3) minute rounds with (1) minute rest.

I have A Title electronic timer, so for next part:

(3) 5 minute rounds, with (1) minute rest, working combos that I call out, last night was primarily focusing on “transitions” or going from an attack to slipping a punch or blocking a kick. Example: a 1-2-3-2, followed by your pad partner throwing a high hook, to you weaving under and coming back with a counter straight or hook,knee, elbow, etc…

Endurance training:

(4) 5 minute rounds with (1) minute rest, 2 striking rounds per student. These are killer and it takes one person to watch the timer.

20 seconds of jabs with 10 seconds rest (example)
20 seconds of hooks with 10 seconds rest (example)
20 seconds of whatever punch or kick you call out, but, it can only be one arm or one leg at a time, no combinations. The student only gets out what he/she puts in the drill, but, if you truly use all your power, you will exhaust yourself and cry for your momma.

Finishing up:

Now that everyone is tired, I like to have everyone stand in a circle about 5 feet apart, get a 20 pound medicine ball and standing in your “fighting stance” place the ball squarely in the center of your chest and USING YOUR ARMS ONLY, thrust the ball as hard as you can to the head of the guy next to you. You must have your hands up in the guard position, catch the ball without it smashing your face and turn and throw it to the next guy in line. I have found that this will cure anyone “dropping their hands” and teaches the student to keep his eyes on the ball, which in turn, teaches you to watch those punches coming in. ( IMHO)

Saturday Training:

This is a closely supervised sparring class and there are usually individuals trained in varous arts who show up for this day only. I would call it a " combat dojo, bring your own style" type of day and we usually have a good time and learn from each other.

Example: Last Saturday, I went a few rounds with a Dutch Marine kickboxer, a TKD South Korean, and a former University of Iowa wrestler , who managed to twist me into all kinds of knots.

Now, Having reread this, I will be the first to state, I am not an expert on any of the arts listed. This is just my PERSONAL way of training and any constructive criticism is more than welcome.


#11

[quote]Kirks wrote:
London - How long have you been training for? And how long did it take you to get that routine? I guess I’m wondering at what sort of level you need to be, to be concentrating on workouts like that…[/quote]

I’ve been training like that for about 10 years, since I started training with the seniors. Even before that, training was pretty intense.

To be honest with you, I think that is a fairly typical boxing gym workload in any amateur gym across the country, right from day one. Of course the thing that varies is the amount of effort you are able to put into it. I can obviously go a lot harder, with a higher punch output, than new lads coming into the gym can. The new lads are still expected to bust their guts over the same routine though. That’s why I’m always voicing my surprise at people who think they are going to just take up boxing, and muai thai and bjj and lift weights on top. In my opinion, just doing any one of those to a decent standard is going to be physically draining and take YEARS to develop the fluency required to add other things on top.

Much like Idaho though, I am a fighter rather than a programming expert, and just because that is how I’ve trained, doesn’t mean it can’t be improved. I am always interested to learn more and know where I can improve my programming. Xen Nova made a post the other day that taught me a lot and has already influenced my training. If any one else has similar insights and improvements, I’m all ears.


#12

Awesome thread. Kind of like reading everyones logs all at once. I just learned some stuff already. I really don’t know what I could add here though. I want to train with you guys and would seriously like to do that if possible.


#13

[quote]Ranzo wrote:
Awesome thread. Kind of like reading everyones logs all at once. I just learned some stuff already. I really don’t know what I could add here though. I want to train with you guys and would seriously like to do that if possible.[/quote]

I would like to request that you expand on your Krav instruction. Example of what you are teaching like: weapon retention?,knife tactics?, type of strikes?, etc…Thanks


#14

[quote]idaho wrote:

[quote]Ranzo wrote:
Awesome thread. Kind of like reading everyones logs all at once. I just learned some stuff already. I really don’t know what I could add here though. I want to train with you guys and would seriously like to do that if possible.[/quote]

I would like to request that you expand on your Krav instruction. Example of what you are teaching like: weapon retention?,knife tactics?, type of strikes?, etc…Thanks [/quote]

x2

No doubt you have plenty of value to add Ranzo.


#15

Ok well I don’t teach anything like weapon retention or knife defenses other than the basic bursting technique. I am not certified or qualified for ninja type things like that. I teach level 1 and level 2 Krav Maga. I do teach the basic handgun defense/takeaways in level 2 though

I will give you the breakdown of my last classes from Monday.

Level 1
Warm up.
Jogging. laps around the mat switching to high knees and alternating side steps. Shoulder Tag. This is like sparring each other but you do not defend only use movement and slips to prevent your opponent to touch your shoulder and or knees. Both partners strike at will. Normally give them 2 min of this.
Situps , leg raises basic calisthenics.
1 minute punching drill. Hitting a pad as hard and fast as you can with enough technique for 1 minute.

Instruction.

As I have said in my logs etc. I am footwork-centric so I always cover proper stance and basic movements in every class. I also try to find time for the students to shadow box and I tell them they should shadow box everyday of their lives.

7 elbows. Basic Muay Thai type elbows working different directions Vertical plane and Horizontal plane elbow strikes.
I demo the elbows and explain what type of situation you would need an elbow?..dude is real friggin close?.duh. Explain again the importance of hip rotation in every strike always and forever sealed with the kiss of death. Demo the elbows again as the class follows my movements in the mirror. Then I pick a couple of strikes and have them work back and forth I will again Demo how I want it to look at full speed and again in slow motion.

Knees- Knees normally involve some type of clinch type situation so I go over the how we hold someone in Krav. Krav uses one hand behind the elbow and the other arm in a cross face position under the chin grabbing the shoulder. This leads to controlling the other guy etc. Basic class, so not a lot of detail here. Cover basic knee strikes and how to perform them with the basic demo as above.

Drills
Now for the fun shit. I make up all kinds of scenarios where the students can ?defend? themselves using the elbow strikes to gain control in the clinch and knee the shit out of somebody. Krav likes you to introduce all kinds of stress into the training like an additional attacker or turning off the lights or throwing shit at them as they do the movements. This keeps them alert to the surroundings and being able to adapt and defend while in the fight. Krav puts a lot of focus on aggression. Sometimes to much I feel. I don?t care how pissed off you are if your technique sucks someone is going to woop your ass.

Self defense:
Headlock defense.

I will spare the details of this I feel I have typed too much and not sure if this is really what people are looking for.

After the self defense portion I threw out some kick shields and have them run around the pads until I give the command and they jump down and ground and pound then I will signal again and they run around. We do this till I am tired or time is up.

Although overly detailed this is the basic outline. Get warm and maybe tired. Learn how to punch, kick and get out of some chokes/holds.

Level 2 classes are more advanced and focus on making combinations, closing distance, using angles etc. This level also gets into more gun and knife defenses based on the RCAT model. I will post up more about how Krav wants it done later.


#16

Krav Maga (whether I am teaching or training)

  1. Warm Up
  2. Technique (here I focus on a particular technique and even if it is not a brand new technique, I still like at least half the reps to be slow and focused on proper form, fluidity and timing.
  3. Summary drill (Stress is induced and I am really trying to replicate an adrenaline rush, while performing the technique(s) practiced in point 2, along with basic awareness and striking.
  4. Sparring (for the more advance) or just some sort of fitness drill to take whats left out of them.
  5. Cool down.

Heavy Bag (this changes, but whats outlined below is the general stucture)

  1. Warm up (inc skipping for 10-15 minutes)
  2. Pick a combo or two - drill each for 10 minutes/A technique or two and drill for high reps.
  3. Rounds:
    a. Shadow Sparring - 3 mins
    b. Heavy bag - 3 x 3 mins
    c. Shadow sparring - 3 mins.

#17

[quote]idaho wrote:
Depending on the work schedule, but, a typical week would be:

Tuesday/ Thursday / Saturday: Muay Thai and Kali

[/quote]

Brief hijack, apologies.

Idaho, I am mostly an RMA guy, but I was thinking about spending some time cross training in something else. What is your opinion of Kali? Obviously you feel it has value as you do it, but I wonder if you would be willing expand on that a little. How directly transferable is it to real world applications, other benefits etc.

Your thoughts would be appreciated.


#18

You’d never know it by watching me fight, but I train probably twice as much grappling as striking.

I lift 2-3 times a week depending on how I feel, basic compound lifts. One lower body lift (squat or deadlift variation) and an upper body push and pull for each session.

For conditioning I mostly do extra sparring and drills, a little running. I like doing sledgehammer swings too. I try to keep it simple, I think the guys you see doing one legged backwards box jumps with a gas mask and an eye patch on are a little silly.

Also yoga. Not as much as I should though, that’s one thing I’d like to do more of. I feel a lot older than I really am sometimes.


#19

[quote]Ranzo wrote:
Ok well I don’t teach anything like weapon retention or knife defenses other than the basic bursting technique. I am not certified or qualified for ninja type things like that. I teach level 1 and level 2 Krav Maga. I do teach the basic handgun defense/takeaways in level 2 though

I will give you the breakdown of my last classes from Monday.

Level 1
Warm up.
Jogging. laps around the mat switching to high knees and alternating side steps. Shoulder Tag. This is like sparring each other but you do not defend only use movement and slips to prevent your opponent to touch your shoulder and or knees. Both partners strike at will. Normally give them 2 min of this.
Situps , leg raises basic calisthenics.
1 minute punching drill. Hitting a pad as hard and fast as you can with enough technique for 1 minute.

Instruction.

As I have said in my logs etc. I am footwork-centric so I always cover proper stance and basic movements in every class. I also try to find time for the students to shadow box and I tell them they should shadow box everyday of their lives.

7 elbows. Basic Muay Thai type elbows working different directions Vertical plane and Horizontal plane elbow strikes.
I demo the elbows and explain what type of situation you would need an elbow?..dude is real friggin close?.duh. Explain again the importance of hip rotation in every strike always and forever sealed with the kiss of death. Demo the elbows again as the class follows my movements in the mirror. Then I pick a couple of strikes and have them work back and forth I will again Demo how I want it to look at full speed and again in slow motion.

Knees- Knees normally involve some type of clinch type situation so I go over the how we hold someone in Krav. Krav uses one hand behind the elbow and the other arm in a cross face position under the chin grabbing the shoulder. This leads to controlling the other guy etc. Basic class, so not a lot of detail here. Cover basic knee strikes and how to perform them with the basic demo as above.

Drills
Now for the fun shit. I make up all kinds of scenarios where the students can ?defend? themselves using the elbow strikes to gain control in the clinch and knee the shit out of somebody. Krav likes you to introduce all kinds of stress into the training like an additional attacker or turning off the lights or throwing shit at them as they do the movements. This keeps them alert to the surroundings and being able to adapt and defend while in the fight. Krav puts a lot of focus on aggression. Sometimes to much I feel. I don?t care how pissed off you are if your technique sucks someone is going to woop your ass.

Self defense:
Headlock defense.

I will spare the details of this I feel I have typed too much and not sure if this is really what people are looking for.

After the self defense portion I threw out some kick shields and have them run around the pads until I give the command and they jump down and ground and pound then I will signal again and they run around. We do this till I am tired or time is up.

Although overly detailed this is the basic outline. Get warm and maybe tired. Learn how to punch, kick and get out of some chokes/holds.

Level 2 classes are more advanced and focus on making combinations, closing distance, using angles etc. This level also gets into more gun and knife defenses based on the RCAT model. I will post up more about how Krav wants it done later.
[/quote]

Good Post, Thank you for the insight on your method of teaching. I am always trying to learn the various methods other instructors use, because, we are all a little different. One of the worst traits I have observed is an instructor who thinks he knows everything, then his students end up knowing stale and unusable crap.


#20

[quote]batman730 wrote:

[quote]idaho wrote:
Depending on the work schedule, but, a typical week would be:

Tuesday/ Thursday / Saturday: Muay Thai and Kali

[/quote]

Brief hijack, apologies.

Idaho, I am mostly an RMA guy, but I was thinking about spending some time cross training in something else. What is your opinion of Kali? Obviously you feel it has value as you do it, but I wonder if you would be willing expand on that a little. How directly transferable is it to real world applications, other benefits etc.

Your thoughts would be appreciated.

Well, let me first emphasize that I am not a Kali expert,and second,I recongize that I will have a microscopic view of the system, since I have been only been working with one instructor.

Due to my current job and location, I have to take what I can get in terms of training,in different styles. I have been working with a guy who trained for 8 years under the Paul Vunak’s Progressive Fighting System, which according to him, is a blend of JKD and Kali. Chris has been generous enough to share his time with me and the other regulars for the past 14 months. So as you can see, I am still in the rookie phase. That being said, here is what I have observed:

Pros:

The stick training is excellent, once you get familar with their method of movement. Being a orthodox figher coming from a heavy background in the strking arts, it was difficult for me to learn to switch from orthodox to southpaw on a continious basis, which is what you doing during the partner stick drills. Once I was able to do that somewhat smoothly, the drills because much more fluid and that has helped improve my overall movement in MT.

These sticks really translate well over to knife drills and since nothing is ever scripted on the street, being able to fight from either lead foot/ left hand/ right hand lead is an distinct advantage.

The empty hands techniques are different from anything I have ever trained in, except for a very brief stint in KF. a lot of “trapping hands” which is geared toward blunting your attackers direction and force, then striking a “nerve center”, then dis-engaging from your attacker.Kicks are direct and low, usually low or right on to the knee cap, and used to stun or dislocate, once again dis-engaging with the attacker.

The style has helped my hand / eye coordination and given me some extra confidence in fighting out of the southpaw style.

As an adaption to the real world, the stick training is excellent and allows you to turn many common items into serious tools: such as canes, broom handles, tennis rackets, wooden dowels , curtain rods, etc…depending on your states weapons laws, this is the perfect style for a @ASP Baton. Disclaimer: know the “self-defense laws” in your state or country of residence.

Cons:

I am not comfortable with the “trapping hands” counter striking used in the system. IMHO, it is too reliant on “nerve strikes”, such as trapping someones punch or grab,
and then strking under the arm to the tricep muscle, to “stun” the arm and then move in for another strike to the eye/ throat. In my time as a street LEO, I found that individuals high on rage, anger, alcohol, drugs, etc…were not that easily put down with “nerve strikes”. Instead of striking under the arm, why do just go for the throat?

Now, to point out again, Chris is the only instructor I have worked with, and, we all have our weak areas, but, in sparring with protective gear, I have noticed, that once you get past his defense, he really has no answer for inside fighting. A good boxer, who can take a punch, would have a field day on his ribs. The style seems to rely on trapping, striking, and then evading. What happes if you are trapped againist a car, wall or bar and cannot evade?

That is (IMHO) the primary weakness of the system.

overall, I enjoy the sticks and knife work and think it has real transferable tactics or the street, as long as you remain with the weapons work

Let me emphatically state that I am not disrepecting the art of Kali/ JDK. I am sure there are countless devoted student/ instructors who are well trained and professional. This was simply my observations from working with ONE instructor.

I hope this helps.