T Nation

Yates and Levrone's Comments about Social Media


#1


Thoughts?


#2

They are 100% correct.


#3

It is interesting to see that while IFBB Pros have a couple thousand followers, youtube stars like furious pete, hodge twins, matt ogus have millions. I think people believe their physiques are reachable with training and nutrition therefore listen to them rather than the professionals. The only drawback they sometimes give really shitty advices and i pity the uneducated people that listen to them.


#4

[quote]Gorillakiv83 wrote:
It is interesting to see that while IFBB Pros have a couple thousand followers, youtube stars like furious pete, hodge twins, matt ogus have millions. I think people believe their physiques are reachable with training and nutrition therefore listen to them rather than the professionals. The only drawback they sometimes give really shitty advices and i pity the uneducated people that listen to them.[/quote]

The thing is though, with the millions of followers the hodge twins have, how many people even listen to their advice? Following someone on social media is just as meaningless as posting the crap. I mean having a follower just means someone clicked a button once. SO I would bet that the majority of the people following the hodge twins just do it just see their stupid antics and be entertained, maybe they don’t even lift.

If Dorian Yates is even on social media, I would bet the majority of his followers know he has earned his own little chunk of immortality in the sport


#5

[quote]Facepalm_Death wrote:

[quote]Gorillakiv83 wrote:
It is interesting to see that while IFBB Pros have a couple thousand followers, youtube stars like furious pete, hodge twins, matt ogus have millions. I think people believe their physiques are reachable with training and nutrition therefore listen to them rather than the professionals. The only drawback they sometimes give really shitty advices and i pity the uneducated people that listen to them.[/quote]

The thing is though, with the millions of followers the hodge twins have, how many people even listen to their advice? Following someone on social media is just as meaningless as posting the crap. I mean having a follower just means someone clicked a button once. SO I would bet that the majority of the people following the hodge twins just do it just see their stupid antics and be entertained, maybe they don’t even lift.

If Dorian Yates is even on social media, I would bet the majority of his followers know he has earned his own little chunk of immortality in the sport
[/quote]

I wish dorian yates had posted videos as frequently as hodge twins.
I would be all ears.
I have his legendary blood and guts video and watched it maybe million times.
Show theeeem Yates, nastyyyyy, squeeezeeee.
Its fantastic.


#6

Context…


#7

Vegan gains has 24 times as many followers as Boris Sheiko.

Sometime the world makes me want to shoot myself.


#8

There are several thoughts and questions that come to mind regarding this topic?

I believe both Levrone and Dorian come across as, dare I say, infantile and/or naive in their statements, in that it shows either they are not in touch with how the world works or are frustrated because supposedly people should accomplish something extraordinary in bodybuilding (or anything for that matter) in order to have a following on You Tube, have fame, and earn money by doing so.

Let’s go over some thoughts and questions here.

Both speak as if someone has to achieve something worthy in order to have a following. I might be wrong in my interpretation of their statements, but that’s what I think. Well, this doesn’t apply considering what it takes to have a following is for people to be funny, entertaining, and/or informative. Or maybe people, including myself, chooses to follow anyone they damn please, for whatever reason, irrational or rational! I don’t need to give good reason on why I follow someone, nor do they have to be impressive for me to follow them. Take Rich Piana for example. I like the guy. He is gregarious and entertaining, the kind of guy I would want to hang out with. Granted I overlook some of the asinine statements he has made in videos, but I overlook this because I like him, and liking someone is all that is needed to be compelled to follow them on You Tube, Instagram, and the like, or (gasp!) even befriend someone in real life! Do I want to follow someone who entertains me, or some IFBB pro who is demonstrating an exercise I have seen performed over and over or is explaining a concept I understood years ago and who might be socially stunted (not all are).

Some social media stars have used the bodybuilding hobby–not competition–to entertain and inform people and in the process out-earn some IFBB pro competitors by multiples! This, considering that the average pro bodybuilder’s salary is $0.00 per year! So let’s say some bodybuilding fanatic soon into this hobby realizes that he is not going to be stepping onstage next to Phil Heath? But let’s say he has tons of useful information, a knack for entertaining people, is well spoken, and so on. What should he do? Squander monetizing his hobby because he didn’t set the bodybuilding world on fire, or because some learned elders don’t approve? Or what if someone simply wants to promote their own products or personal training and nutrition business? Why should they hold back?

Regarding Levrone’s statement that no one is going to win a major show by throwing up pictures on Instagram, who the hell of sound mind is going to think that doing so is going to help them win a show? And get this: once again, no one needs to ask for permission or approval to throw up whatever social media content they damn please, and the same concept goes for whoever wants to follow them!


#9

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:
Vegan gains has 24 times as many followers as Boris Sheiko.

Sometime the world makes me want to shoot myself.[/quote]

I am not surprised. He is controversial and entertaining to many. Sheiko is not to many.


#10

[quote]Facepalm_Death wrote:

[quote]Gorillakiv83 wrote:
It is interesting to see that while IFBB Pros have a couple thousand followers, youtube stars like furious pete, hodge twins, matt ogus have millions. I think people believe their physiques are reachable with training and nutrition therefore listen to them rather than the professionals. The only drawback they sometimes give really shitty advices and i pity the uneducated people that listen to them.[/quote]

The thing is though, with the millions of followers the hodge twins have, how many people even listen to their advice? Following someone on social media is just as meaningless as posting the crap. I mean having a follower just means someone clicked a button once. SO I would bet that the majority of the people following the hodge twins just do it just see their stupid antics and be entertained, maybe they don’t even lift.

If Dorian Yates is even on social media, I would bet the majority of his followers know he has earned his own little chunk of immortality in the sport
[/quote]

Aside from taking advice from non-professionals about matters in which professionals are actually worth listening to, following people to see their stupid antics and be entertained are good enough reasons to follow them, I believe. Now, if people are following perverse, evil, or destructive people, then I’d say we have a problem.

Getting a following on social media and earning a living from it is not about the sport. It’s about followers. Most people involved in building their own bodies don’t even know about the sport. You think Zyzz or those who emulate him can rattle off the stats and contest history of some high ranking pros, or name contests aside form the Arnold or Olympia or care to follow the circuit? Actually most gym rats are concerned with themselves and their own bodies. Hence why when some featured bodybuilding guests show up at places, hardly anyone shows up or knows who the fuck they are! :slight_smile:

I believe people like Dorian and Levrone CAN’T generate the following the other social media stars have, even if they tried or if they were in their heyday. It’s not in them. They are not clowns, flashy, exceptionally funny, or flamboyant, especially Dorian.

Modesty does not work, especially in current day America.


#11

I hate to say it but I agree about their naivete -social media like instagram and the youtubez is a tsunami that cant be ignored, especially for such a superficial and image based industry.

Jen Selter’s ass with 6 million instagram friends now has a much bigger impact and name recognition on young fitness consumers than these guys. Butt shots linked to endorsements or that go viral can earn her 50k a piece!

Not in fitness but this little shit is now generating $18 mill a year( he takes home 7) just by filming himself play video games and creating a buzz on youtube…

Rich Piana has some interesting perspectives here…


#12

[quote]BrickHead wrote:

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:
Vegan gains has 24 times as many followers as Boris Sheiko.

Sometime the world makes me want to shoot myself.[/quote]

I am not surprised. He is controversial and entertaining to many. Sheiko is not to many. [/quote]

I get the entertainment, but more people are also taking diet and training advice from him too.


#13

What needs to be pointed out is that 99% of the people training or paying attention to their diet have absolutely no interest in ever stepping onstage for any reason. For those people, 2 things will determine who they follow:

1- if they feel the person is relatable or physique attainable in some way
2- entertainment value

Imo more than half the people spendin countless hours everyday doling out “advice” via social media have no business doing so.

S


#14

These guys are spot on.

The Shredz guys kill me.

Just to pick one Shredz example: @DevinPhysique…he’s like 24, looks good, has no plans to ever compete, doesnt have any coaching or PT credentials, but has garnered a million followers on Instagram because he’s “aesthetic” has cool tattoos and lots of colorful shoes.

The dude just bought a brand new lambo, lives in a pent house in SoCal and for what? Doling out the same generic life coach advice on instagram everyday? Emailing the same diet template to every bro that sends him money via paypal?

I dont want to sound like im hating too much, if he’s inspiring people great, but i cant shake the feeling that guys like him just sort of got lucky. They didnt have to work that hard for what they have, going to the gym 5 or 6 days a week and eating right is really not that hard, especially when you dont have to hold down a real job.

The other thing that i find grating is how he’s always talking about how he had to slave away working 3 part time jobs and flipping burgers when he was 20…what, you mean like all the rest of us? yikes.

Then guys like Evan Centopani, Chris Tuttle, John Meadows…the real gurus, with the real trophy’s and hard work to their names, are basically unknown to all but hardcore fans, and can only dream of making that kind of money.

I think 98% of people care more about living vicariously through others on social media, rather than gleaning any real information/motivation. Its sad.


#15

^Good post. I think it’s this current selfie/reality show generation though. Not that it’s all bad, but the fact that we follow and give attention (“celebritize?”) people who haven’t really accomplished anything in the traditionally expected sense (ie. Educational accomplishments, Athletic accomplishments etc).

S


#16

You mean like the current US President?


#17

[quote]audiogarden1 wrote:
These guys are spot on.

The Shredz guys kill me.

Just to pick one Shredz example: @DevinPhysique…he’s like 24, looks good, has no plans to ever compete, doesnt have any coaching or PT credentials, but has garnered a million followers on Instagram because he’s “aesthetic” has cool tattoos and lots of colorful shoes.

The dude just bought a brand new lambo, lives in a pent house in SoCal and for what? Doling out the same generic life coach advice on instagram everyday? Emailing the same diet template to every bro that sends him money via paypal?

I dont want to sound like im hating too much, if he’s inspiring people great, but i cant shake the feeling that guys like him just sort of got lucky. They didnt have to work that hard for what they have, going to the gym 5 or 6 days a week and eating right is really not that hard, especially when you dont have to hold down a real job.

The other thing that i find grating is how he’s always talking about how he had to slave away working 3 part time jobs and flipping burgers when he was 20…what, you mean like all the rest of us? yikes.

Then guys like Evan Centopani, Chris Tuttle, John Meadows…the real gurus, with the real trophy’s and hard work to their names, are basically unknown to all but hardcore fans, and can only dream of making that kind of money.

I think 98% of people care more about living vicariously through others on social media, rather than gleaning any real information/motivation. Its sad. [/quote]

These are good points, but during this recent controversy with Bostin Lloyd it came to light that John Meadows is actually doing pretty well financially.

And as for these guys that live on social media: they are the type to buy flashy vehicles and expensive property. Doesn’t necessarily mean they can afford it though. And they have no security precisely because of their luck. In 2 years time I doubt anyone could just elbow John Meadows out of his niche. But there’s probably 100 guys right now that could possibly just replace @devinphysique within 2 years.

I doubt any of the true gurus like JM will become fabulously rich celebrities. But if they know their stuff and can produce results for their clients then they definitely have the potential to acquire wealth and live more comfortably than average people. Do they even want to be celebrities? I doubt John Meadows envies any of the Shredz guys


#18

Not trying to hijack the forum, but this article has an excellent idea when it talks about how everyone considers themselves experts, I think the same logic it uses applies to the topic we are discussing: http://www.hughhewitt.com/just-because-someone-runs-it-does-not-mean-they-want-to-be-president/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook


#19

We can talk about who is getting fame and making dough and who got lucky. But there is nothing and no one stopping anyone here with a good physique and knowledge from setting up social media accounts and flooding them with memes, self-help statements (crass as they may be), and photos and starting an online fitness and nutrition business.

Modesty doesn’t work in making extraordinary amounts of money online or media in general, especially in America.

Does anyone think all people who make extraordinary amounts of money, drive Lambos, and live in mansions got to where they are with honest days of work? :slight_smile:

Chris Tuttle is a smart guy. We went to the same school for dietetic internships and I believe he still works as an RD at a hospital in addition to his bodybuilding business.

One of the respected guys mentioned fires off the same lifting programs to people, regardless of their conditions, strength levels, and experience, which I consider not good.

Does anyone think someone can have 100+ clients by tailoring everything individually as a one-man shop? :slight_smile:


#20

I think: this is a case of apples vs oranges.