T Nation

Wrist Flexibility

In the past three months during my training I was introduced to Olympic style lifting via Chad Waterbury workouts and Crossfit. As the subject line states, my issue right now is my wrist flexibility. It’s really having a negative affect on my ability to clean the weights properly. Any suggestions on how to increase it as soon as possible. I’d like to start really putting my all in but the wrist are holding me back.

Do you front squat?

[quote]Zap Branigan wrote:
Do you front squat?[/quote]

Yes, with the Olympic grip not the crossed arm style…I’ve been doing them that way since December.

I have the same problem and I think it’s just something that takes time. When the bar is in the clean position I just hold onto it with two fingers. I would try just practicing picking up the weight with the bar in the rack.

Dan John has some good warm ups and stretches for the wrists for front squats and cleans.

I also use two or three fingers in the clean position.

[quote]joburnet wrote:
I have the same problem and I think it’s just something that takes time. When the bar is in the clean position I just hold onto it with two fingers. I would try just practicing picking up the weight with the bar in the rack.[/quote]

I started doing them that way this month when I just couldn’t clean the weight and receive into position when it got heavier. I usually have three fingers on the bar.

just stretch out your hands on the floor before

and lift your fingers up to stretch further

Are you sure it’s just wrist flexibility? To rack the bar properly you also need good flexibility in your lats, shoulders and triceps.

A good stretch: (In the rack) Grab the bar with a full grip and rack it on your shoulders, but don’t unrack it and walk it out. Instead get someone to gently push up on your elbows as you try and resist them. A variation is to set the pins in a power rack at a height just above your bottom position in the front squat, and do the same.

[quote]schultzie wrote:
just stretch out your hands on the floor before

and lift your fingers up to stretch further[/quote]

Thanks for the tip…today was front squat day and it helped

[quote]ninearms wrote:
Are you sure it’s just wrist flexibility? To rack the bar properly you also need good flexibility in your lats, shoulders and triceps.

A good stretch: (In the rack) Grab the bar with a full grip and rack it on your shoulders, but don’t unrack it and walk it out. Instead get someone to gently push up on your elbows as you try and resist them. A variation is to set the pins in a power rack at a height just above your bottom position in the front squat, and do the same.[/quote]

Its definitely the wrist, unfortunately, I train solo in my home gym, no one to assist.

Try warming up the muscles of the forearm with some light reverse curls and wrist curls using both flexion and extension (in both directions), then do some PNF stretching of the wrist again hitting both the wrist flexion and extension.

[quote]Rick Jakubowski wrote:
Try warming up the muscles of the forearm with some light reverse curls and wrist curls using both flexion and extension (in both directions), then do some PNF stretching of the wrist again hitting both the wrist flexion and extension.[/quote]

I’m sorry, I’m unfamiliar with “PNF”, what does it stand for?

Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) is a more advanced form of flexibility training that involves both the stretching and contraction of the muscle group being targeted. PNF stretching was originally developed as a form of rehabilitation, and to that effect it is very effective. It is also excellent for targeting specific muscle groups, and as well as increasing flexibility, (and range of movement) it also improves muscular strength.

[quote]Rick Jakubowski wrote:
Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) is a more advanced form of flexibility training that involves both the stretching and contraction of the muscle group being targeted. PNF stretching was originally developed as a form of rehabilitation, and to that effect it is very effective. It is also excellent for targeting specific muscle groups, and as well as increasing flexibility, (and range of movement) it also improves muscular strength.[/quote]

Its not “easy” but it works well, you need to devote some serious time to it. try daily or more often. once you have developed your flexibility you shuold be able to maintain it on less frequent stretching, say, 4/5 times a week?

Thank you both, it’s much appreciated.