T Nation

Wrestling 5/3/1 In-season Template


#1

Dear Mr. Wendler
First, i have to thank you for comming up with such a flexible and simple training system. It allows for multiple goals to be achieved, without excuses, and, above all, it's straightforward.
I have a question about your In-season Template;
I have been doing it, and i have been able to make progress, even in-season, while never taking away from sports training. I have been using this template:

Day One:
Squat 5/3/1
Bench Press 5/3/1
Weighted Chins
*GHR

Day Two:
P. Clean
Deadlift 5/3/1
Press 5/3/1
Pull-ups

The thing is, i have had a knee injury in the past, when a guy shot straight against my leg. I know the importance of posterior chain work, to maintain balance and avoid injury, but, i haven't got access to a GHR. Would Good Mornings be an acceptable replacement?

thanks


#2

does anyone have any insight on this?


#3

Do you have access to a 45 degree back extension? The way Bret Contreras explains how to do them prioritizes the hamstrings and glutes as opposed to the typical way of doing them, It’s very similar to a GHR, but with a different angle.

You could also look into doing Nordic Hamstring Curls, RDL’s, or cable pull throughs . These work the hamstrings in hip extension. I personally like to do hamstring curls as well.


#4

Thanks for the info provided
Yes indeed the GHR or leg curl would train the distal aspect of the hamstrings, but i am under impression it is developed isometrically via Hip extension exercises.
I understand that you also mentioned those exercises (back extension), because it places less stress on the body, but i haven’t access to that apparatus.
No excuses to get strong, just trying to find a suitable solution to work with what i have at hand (rack, bench, plates and bar).


#5

What about the good 'ol Stiff-legged Deadlift?


#6

Seems like a good alternative then. I know Jim regards it as a valuable exercise aswell. I just thought that maybe the Good Morning with it’s lighter load would be better during the season. Nevertheless, I am greatfull for all the experience fellow menbers might want to share.

5/3/1 allowed me to progress during the season, all without compromising what’s really important: performance of the field. And life is a journey, not a race. It’s better to improve a little everyday, than to run into a wall


#7

[quote]RollingThor wrote:
Seems like a good alternative then. I know Jim regards it as a valuable exercise aswell. I just thought that maybe the Good Morning with it’s lighter load would be better during the season. [/quote]

Have you ever read Mr. Wendler’s thoughts on the Good Morning exercise? He basically said he got more out of them by lightening the load and focusing on the movement more. The same thought can be applied to the Stiff-legged Deadlift. Lighten the load, focus on form, and use it as assistance lift rather than treating it as a main movement.


#8

I would not be doing GM’s in season - light SLDL can work but your main focus in-season:

  1. Do well in your sport.
  2. In high school, get stronger.

Because you are doing so much OUTSIDE the weight room, you need to do less in the weight room. Even when you feel “good.” That doesn’t mean you lift more. I find it an interesting study when people choose to wreck themselves when they feel good. It’s as if they feel they don’t deserve to feel good. Anyway - be smart.


#9

Thanks for your advice Mr. Wendler, and i am also grateful for everyone’s tip here.
I recently returned from injury and have been doing well on the mat and even weight room. Weight room training has never been the main focus, but i have been fortunate enough to find and follow good guidelines both from your work and also coach Rippetoe’s work. During the season (basically 11 months) i use your in-season template, and it has allowed me to improve year round, and remain strong for my sport. I never killed myself in the weight room, inteligent programming, only do some back-off sets, focussing on speed and form. My coach for instance, has my mates doing partial bench presses and kettlebell swings on bosu balls… Sports specific training will always be my focus, but international competition requires you to be prepared for a lot of challanges, and i know you have vast experience regarding this experience.

Regarding the assistance question. I never did goodmornings heavy, i followed your advice, and used good form, i just wanted to get more posterior chain work to avoid injury, so i can keep performing well when it matters. I know you recommend the GHR, but i have no access to it, so I was looking for a good substitute.

Thank you for insight coach Wendler, and for the principles you’ve been preaching. Focussing on long-term goals has helped me up a lot as a competitor


#10

[quote]Jim Wendler wrote:
I would not be doing GM’s in season - light SLDL can work but your main focus in-season:

  1. Do well in your sport.
  2. In high school, get stronger.

Because you are doing so much OUTSIDE the weight room, you need to do less in the weight room. Even when you feel “good.” That doesn’t mean you lift more. I find it an interesting study when people choose to wreck themselves when they feel good. It’s as if they feel they don’t deserve to feel good. Anyway - be smart.[/quote]

Sorry if it seems like a bump to you Mr. Wendler, and to the rest of the community. I know you have written about this before, but I just wanted to know if you aprove the way I organized training AROUND sports demands. I highly value your knowledge, and above all, the fact that you lead by example, and have been/are an athlete yourself. Forgive me if you think I should use my judgement, but I am just trying to find a way to work hard, but in a smart way. Getting strong is very important, and has helped my performance, but, I would rather organize things so I can keep performing well at my sport, and improving slowly in the weight room. By not running myself into the ground on the weight room, I am able to perform well on the mat, and get stronger.


#11

Mr. Wendler, any other changes you would make for an in-season athlete with access to limited equipment?


#12

I understand i need to learn to think about this kind of things be myself. You and other people have already talked about ways to organize one’s training, and, above all, how training should be approached. The principles have served me well, and shall allow me to improve at my sport:

-Work Hard, but don’t lift yourself out of practice
-Progress Slowly and set records
-Monitor your progress; Have performance-based goals and indicators
-Believe in what works, ditch the crap


#13

[quote]RollingThor wrote:
I understand i need to learn to think about this kind of things be myself. You and other people have already talked about ways to organize one’s training, and, above all, how training should be approached. The principles have served me well, and shall allow me to improve at my sport:

-Work Hard, but don’t lift yourself out of practice
-Progress Slowly and set records
-Monitor your progress; Have performance-based goals and indicators
-Believe in what works, ditch the crap[/quote]

This is good and you are on the correct path. I’d also stress to have training BALANCE. Balance does NOT mean hamstrings/quad ratio or some other useless crap. It means you address all areas of training.

You are on the right track.


#14

[quote]Jim Wendler wrote:

[quote]RollingThor wrote:
I understand i need to learn to think about this kind of things be myself. You and other people have already talked about ways to organize one’s training, and, above all, how training should be approached. The principles have served me well, and shall allow me to improve at my sport:

-Work Hard, but don’t lift yourself out of practice
-Progress Slowly and set records
-Monitor your progress; Have performance-based goals and indicators
-Believe in what works, ditch the crap[/quote]

This is good and you are on the correct path. I’d also stress to have training BALANCE. Balance does NOT mean hamstrings/quad ratio or some other useless crap. It means you address all areas of training.

You are on the right track.[/quote]

Thanks for stepping in coach. I will strive for balance. Being strong is important, but, a good program for any athlete (and person) adresses strength, conditioning, and mobility. These things must be adressed with equal importance so that the weaknesses (injuries, etc.) don’t show up.

Thanks for all your work coach! People like you and Mr. Rippetoe have really contributed to deliver athletes and people alike, honesty, hard-work and effectiveness.