T Nation

Workout Routine Critique


#1

First post, I wanted to see what you guys thought of this workout, which I ripped from Men's Health (James Bond workout, cheesy I know but my goal is for my body to look like that). I've already been working out and have been on a full body routine, but I plan to switch to this or something similar soon. For diet I'm following the anabolic model and am also eating every three hours when awake. I would appreciate any feedback, thanks.

Monday's Workout
Power Circuit
Reps: 10 of each exercise
Sets: 3
Clean and Press
Weighted Knee Raise
Weighted Stepups
Pullup
Incline Pushup
Triceps Dips

Tuesday's Workout
Chest and Back
Reps: 10 of each exercise
Sets: 4
Incline Bench Press
Pullup
Incline Pushup
Incline Pec Flys

Wednesday's Workout
Legs
Reps: 10 of each exercise
Sets: 4
Squat
Straight-Leg Deadlift
Hamstring Curl
Weighted Lunge

Thursday's Workout
Shoulders and Arms
Reps: 10 of each exercise
Sets: 4
Incline Biceps Curls
Triceps Dips
Lateral Raises
Shoulder Press

Friday's Workout
Power Circuit
Reps: 10 of each exercise
Sets: 3
Clean and Press
Weighted Knee Raise
Weighted Stepups
Pullup
Incline Pushup
Triceps Dips


#2

I honestly think it's horrible.


#3

Pullups the only back work? No direct trap work?

Look up "starting strength" or "5/3/1"

Stop reading Men's Health (except for the humor value).


#4

In what ways can it be improved?


#5

by not being from mens health, seriously. some author just pulled that out of his ass, not the precise way daniel craig trained before filming. although his legs sucked hard.


#6

Keep in mind that there are MANY, MANY other rep/set schemes out there. 3-4 sets of 10 is a valid means of progression, but will quickly halt if that's ALL you do every. single. day. Not EVERYTHING in Men's Health is complete crap...I mean it wouldn't sell if NO ONE got results from it...oh wait, shakeweight. But for real, it's good to learn to read through this kind of stuff with a bullshit detector.

  1. Did the article that outlined that workout program explain any of the motivation behind the methodology? i.e. why 3-4 sets of 10? what is the purpose of the "power" circuits? (True power by the way is not something that can be sustained over 10 reps)

  2. Daniel Craig is a millionaire, and his trainer was probably paid quite generously. If this is REALLY what he did, why would it be featured in all its glory in Men's Health for only a couple of bucks out of your pocket?

Could you get results from this type of training? Maybe. Depends on how hard you push yourself and if you focus on progressing on all the lifts.

Is it optimal? Probably not. Since like a poor hybrid of Crossfit training twice a week with body part split the other 3.

Will it help you get the results you want? I don't know. You never listed your goals, your strength and body comp stats, or your daily diet regimen. (Saying you want to look like D. Craig doesn't cut it.) We need more to help steer you in the right direction for your goals.


#7

i can just picture it now. a guy i know coming up to me, asking what program i'm on and then telling me about the KILLER workout he got from men's health, and that it got daniel craig RIPPED for bond.

i guess there is a bit of truth to it being a "killer workout" for some, after all, the high reps play into the idea of REPS GETTING YOU RIPPED!, and the "power circuit" would probably produce a good oxygen deficit considering that you start it off with 10 reps of clean and press.

the type of person i can picture buying into this is the same type that would come up to me and slip the secret little tidbit of knowledge that squat curls are better than just squats because you're working out more body parts. or that structures a "leg day" around some light stepups, jumps on and off a box, and some calf raises or whatever else.

i think most people on tmuscle advocate programs with progressive overload, based on the main compound lifts. 5/3/1, starting strength, ws4sb, thibideau's HTH, or even a traditional 5 day split.


#8

I don't like that workout plan at all. I assume you are not on steriods, so you should do an upper and lower body split working each muscle twice a week. You could also do a total body workout twice a week or 3 times a week. You could even do 1 upper body day, 1 lower body day, then 1 total body day.

Those one body part a week programs are for people on roids.

Also, the exercises in the plan suck.

Just do 3-4 sets of 1 exercise per muscle. Keeping the reps between 5 and 12.

If you use proper form, mind body connection etc and use the progressive overload priniciple, eat right, rest you will gain weight on a simple plan like this. Now if you do this workout for several month and your strength stalls then it is time to modify.

I had a chest that was lower chest dominate, which means even if your chest is hard as a rock it looks like you have breast under your shirt. Don't make this mistake, work your upper chest more than your lower.

use these exercises below parallel squats, deadlifts, ...do not do barbell bench presses unless you have a spotter or do them in the safety rack... because you can not effectively apply the progress overload principle to these evercises otherwise....do incline dumbbell press, preacher curls, dummbbell rows, dumbbell shrugs, pull ups, neck exercises, leg curls, standing calf raises, military press, side raises, rear delt raises,


#9

Amazing! You wrote the perfect program for the OP from your cyber assessment. You are truly skilled considering you have no idea what he looks like, how strong he is, what his goals are, etc.

I hate when people on here finally learn something about their body from their own personal experience and think it's the right advice for anyone else lifting regardless of their goals or body comp.


#10

Amazing! You wrote the perfect program for the OP from your cyber assessment. You are truly skilled considering you have no idea what he looks like, how strong he is, what his goals are, etc.

I hate when people on here finally learn something about their body from their own personal experience and think it's the right advice for anyone else lifting regardless of their goals or body comp.

If he doesn't like the way his body will look like on this program, then something is wrong with him!


#11

Thanks for all of the responses: just to defend myself somewhat, I do realize that the program I outlined from MH was probably pulled out of someone's ass in an attempt to approximate with Daniel Craig did �¢?? and I do get that it is cheesy as shit, but was not going to let that stop me from seeing what you guys thought.

I have been on a full body program (pretty unstructured, just trying to hit every muscle as hard as a can) every other day and finishing off with 25 min on a bike and just switched over to a upper body one day lower body the other day program that rotates exercises for the other weekly upper body and lower body days .

My body: I weight somewhere in the neighborhood of 165-170 and had started to turn into a bit of a soft body after eating a lot and not working out out, I looked in the mirror one day after I broke up with my gf and realized that my ability to pull ass would likely improve if I got back in shape.

My goals: I realize that it sounds cheesy, but the way Daniel Craig's body looked in James Bond is the goal, I don't want to look like a body builder, but I want girls to swoon when I take off my shirt. I want a very hard look and I would like my shape to be in proportion to my body, meaning I would like to be able to bench/workout at my body weight, do tons of pull-ups, dips pushups etc. I am getting ready to graduate college and will be working 80+ hours a week so will have little time to work-out 5 months, as such I want to get in great shape now that I have time and the move to some type or 30 min circuit program that I can manage once I am working.

For diet, I am eating very little carbs and am eating ~every three hours, I try to shoot for 40% protein 60% fat, I have 24 hours are carbs (anything I want) every four days.


#12

congratulations on writing the dumbest thing ever posted on a website..ever.


#13

Just throwing out an idea to see what you think. Since you have no bodybuilding aspirations, I think it's key for you to build a solid foundation first right now. The stronger you get, the easier you'll find yourself being able to cut or add muscle later on when you decide to switch gears. Typically, people around here suggest 5/3/1; however, that program won't get you what you want as quickly as your looking for it, so you could look into Cressey's "Maximum Strength" program. It's a good all around program mostly geared towards improving your strength numbers with a good variety of cardio work to do on recovery days. It's about 16 weeks long. You won't put on the size you would on a pure hypertrophy program, but you will put on the size your body needs to put up bigger numbers. Additionally, if you eat right and stick to the cardio work on your off days, you should be able to keep the fat off. This will be your first 4 months.

For that final month you can fine tune your diet and try the following regimen:
http://www.T-Nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/destroying_fat_war_room_strategies_to_maximize_fat_loss
Or, if you have the money, do the velocity program:
http://velocity.T-Nation.com/free_online_program/sports_body_training_diet_velocity/velocity_diet_30#velocity-training/secrets-to-velocity-training