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Working So Hard It Makes You Sick

For the most part its on leg days, i can hold it in until i get finished up but my the time i get back to my car i have to hurl.
its like clock work, i don’t know if my diet is whack, or just the lack of blood going to my brain. or maybe i am just pushing my self beyond my limits. either way its not fun at all.

do any of you guys experience this at all?

P.s i have tried going with food in my stomach and on an empty stomach. same result

Sounds like you’re doing it right.

What would be worse, feeling physically ill from training too hard, or having that “I should have done more” feeling.

What’s your leg day look like?

you are doing nothing right if you are getting to that point, and it will be detrimental to your health if it keeps happening so frequently, there are many ways to push yourself but if you are hurling almost everytime you do it its obviously bad, and nothing to be proud of or feel “macho” about as someone above suggested.

if i was you id go see the doctor, or improve your fitness gradually

I get nauseous during the workout pretty regularly, but I’ve only thrown up once.

[quote]The sofa king wrote:
For the most part its on leg days, i can hold it in until i get finished up but my the time i get back to my car i have to hurl.
its like clock work, i don’t know if my diet is whack, or just the lack of blood going to my brain. or maybe i am just pushing my self beyond my limits. either way its not fun at all.

do any of you guys experience this at all?

P.s i have tried going with food in my stomach and on an empty stomach. same result [/quote]

Spewing once or twice a year is no big deal.but if it happens all the time buddy then something is not right.

Im guessing it could be from too much lactic acid buildup.I assume u do very high reps?

Doing very high reps with heavy weight is the only thing that makes me feel like spewing during Or after a workout.

Yeah, all the time, but I know what it’s from; it’s my own fault. If I don’t have Surge, I’ll drink milk before a workout and usually drink it and go to the gym too early. It basically stop digesting while I lift and just sits there and then I puke the milk and whatever I ate before that when I’m done.

It only happens on leg day and one back day once.

Have puked twice on leg days, a couple years back, although I felt close every time I did a 20-rep squat workout. I’d say if it happens every time you have a problem.

Happens alot to me when I drop the carbs and eat too close to a workout, are you working out 11/2-2 hours after eating, or 30 min, how much are you eating?

What pre-workout supps are you taking?

But when I feel so nausious that I might hurl I usually start taking longer breaks and just leave early if it gets too bad…

How is your cardiovascular fitness? Bringing that up might raise your tolerance to anerobic oxygen debt.

Actually I puked 5 min before my midterm today, was just a combo of a bad protien shake and pre-test jitters.

[quote]honest wrote:
you are doing nothing right if you are getting to that point, and it will be detrimental to your health if it keeps happening so frequently, there are many ways to push yourself but if you are hurling almost everytime you do it its obviously bad, and nothing to be proud of or feel “macho” about as someone above suggested.

if i was you id go see the doctor, or improve your fitness gradually[/quote]

Bullshit. For some people, it is the norm. I’m talking trained athletes that have lifted for years and are in proper cardiovascular shape, not some fat sack of shit in the process of starting training. For those that have this problem and it isn’t food timing related, the only two options are to keep training and get used to it, or back off some (take longer rest between sets, lower the volume and/or intensity) etc. If you choose to keep up with the intensity and have to puke, make sure you rinse your mouth out after and drink some water. The acid is bad for the enamel and throat.

I have always had this issue. You get used to being able to control it and finding ways around it.

You don’t want to be puking all the time obviously, but feeling nauseous when you really push yourself is ordinary, regardless of what someone that is 6’2 and 170lbs ‘honestly’ thinks about it.

What worked for me:

  1. When you feel nauseous, take a little break. Calm your body down, some people find sitting or laying down and putting their legs up helps.
  2. Smile! Smiling hampers your gag reflex and this is the main thing I do that helps me clear up quickly and get back to it. No I’m not joking, I know it sounds silly to just sit there smiling. It works. It also cultivates positive feelings about your workout!

As someone above me said, you’re doing something right. You just need to learn to deal with this side-effect so that it doesn’t become a problem or deterrant to your workouts.

LOL, I spewed for a good 2 minutes straight two Sundays ago… didn’t relise how much fluid i had in me…

Did a circuit of;
20x squats,
20x seated rows,
20x seated bench,
20x RDL.

Rested 3-4 minutes & repeated. Then lay on the floor for about 10 minutes with feet elevated to try & feel better.
Rest between sets was limited to my training partner’s set.

*note sets are typically 8-12 + 4-5 + 2-3 + 2-3, possibly some singles to get to 20.

My “sickness” exercise is squats. Typically squats with decent weight for multiple sets, with minimal rest.
Any sustained high exertion squat efforts, eg 10+ reps or even heavy 5x5, seem to do it.

i use to train mornings, but after being late to work a few too many times, I started training legs at night.

You will probably find its a specific exercise that does it to you, play around & work out what it is and then try to manage it.

Otherwise it may be the total volume of your leg day, try splitting quads from hams & see if it helps.

Also you may want to try superset an easy exercise in with your heavy sets, to give yourself a longer break & get your blood into a different body part. Try a light recovery/ mobility set, just don’t exert yourself on the other exercise or you’ll just add to the nauseous feeling.

The only other thing that has made me physically sick is pre-season sand hill sprints.

Mr popular makes a good point regarding “smiling”. The mind has more effect on your body then most people expect, i use the thought of feeling better/ well/ happy to help get me better. It works for me when i get travel sickness, or a minor headache. Granted though, sometimes you just need to get it out to feel better.

Like MikiB said, at least you know you?re putting in some effort in.

Keep pushing,
JC

I usually get a little sick on heavy leg days and if I ever feel like im going to hurl i ask for a chewable glucose pill. In seconds you will be back to normal.

are you improving? if you workout to the point of vomiting and see great gains, its worth it, i suppose. if you arent improving, change it up. no reason to work to the point of sickness if you’re not seeing results.

[quote]BlackSabbath wrote:
honest wrote:
you are doing nothing right if you are getting to that point, and it will be detrimental to your health if it keeps happening so frequently, there are many ways to push yourself but if you are hurling almost everytime you do it its obviously bad, and nothing to be proud of or feel “macho” about as someone above suggested.

if i was you id go see the doctor, or improve your fitness gradually

Bullshit. For some people, it is the norm. I’m talking trained athletes that have lifted for years and are in proper cardiovascular shape, not some fat sack of shit in the process of starting training. For those that have this problem and it isn’t food timing related, the only two options are to keep training and get used to it, or back off some (take longer rest between sets, lower the volume and/or intensity) etc. If you choose to keep up with the intensity and have to puke, make sure you rinse your mouth out after and drink some water. The acid is bad for the enamel and throat.
[/quote]

I think you have very little knowledge on this topic. Proffesional athletes would NEVER think it was ok to throw up after EVERY physical activity they indulged in. It happens to all of us everynow and then, and most of us are pretty fit im also not talking about fatasses.

If you are talkin about bodybuilders on the other hand maybe you are right, maybe they are used to it, but i would definetly not call them “professional athletes” lol, and they are used to the shorter life span. I dont think this guy wants to sacrifice his health in order to “push through it”, or i dont reccomend it for anyone at least.

Again it happening every now and then is fairly normal, but happening everytime is something that has to change, and definitely not somethning that a “proffesional athlete” does as well.

I actaully like to feel hungry before going to train(it goes away as soon as I hit the weight and my body just feels very comfortable with and empty stomach). Sometimes I’ll have my last meal 2-4 hours before training to assure I don’t throw up, specially when doing squats and dead-lifts.

It may be the case that supplementation aimed at reducing exercise-induced acidification of the blood might help you, as the response you are suffering may be due to reduced blood pH.

These would include beta-alanine, glutamine, sodium bicarbonate, and citrulline. You might not need them all, but if any one or two don’t do the job one might try them all in combination.

This is an “in theory” suggestion: I don’t know of practical examples as I haven’t known of sufferers of your condition trying these things. However it is known that reduced (more acidic) blood pH caused by exercise can be the cause of vomiting, and it is known that these things can keep blood pH more normal despite exercise.

[quote]honest wrote:
I think you have very little knowledge on this topic. Proffesional athletes would NEVER think it was ok to throw up after EVERY physical activity they indulged in. It happens to all of us everynow and then, and most of us are pretty fit im also not talking about fatasses.

If you are talkin about bodybuilders on the other hand maybe you are right, maybe they are used to it, but i would definetly not call them “professional athletes” lol, and they are used to the shorter life span. I dont think this guy wants to sacrifice his health in order to “push through it”, or i dont reccomend it for anyone at least.

Again it happening every now and then is fairly normal, but happening everytime is something that has to change, and definitely not somethning that a “proffesional athlete” does as well.[/quote]

Hey shithead, pro bodybuilders are fucking athletes, and if you don’t think so you’re an ignorant motherfucker. Guys that have the discipline to train brutally for years on end with poundages your bitch ass can only look at in awe. Yeah, they’re not athletes, you dumb motherfucker. I have plenty of knowledge on the topic. The select few who have this problem have it.

They deal with it by adjusting their workouts to minimize the occurence, but it still happens. Usually with large compound movements like clean and jerks, deadlifts, and squats. These unfortunate people have to deal with it. Get a kick out of your advice. Go to a doctor? What the fuck is your family practitioner going to tell you about modifying your training?

If you had a legitimate health concern causing the issue, and had reason to believe you have one, then by all means seek medical help. But in general, a doctor is not going to have expertise in how the fuck to help you with that problem. I am talking about those that get this regardless of food timing and ruling out low blood sugar (consuming carbs with the workout).

I have known numerous people throughout my years that have had this issue, including college football players, wrestlers, mma competitors, and plain old bodybuilders. It is something that some have to deal with. I have yet to see a solution, only training modifications that ease the feeling and minimize the frequency of hurling. If you have the magic answer, feel free to educate us all, shithead.

So i have done some research into my diet and discovered that it was a caffeine overload in my system that was causing me to spew every time. NO explode is to blame, that was the only thing different through out the entire week that i was doing different. I was only taking it on Thursday legs.

there have been some major gains to i am not too worried about my misfortune

here is what my day looks like

Squat 3/8
Leg press 3/10
Lunge 3/12
Leg extensions 3/15
Stiff leg dead lift 3/10
Lying leg curl 3/15
Calf raises-standing 3/12
Calf raises-seated 3/15 <Right here is where i begin to locate the nearest trashcan

[quote]BlackSabbath wrote:
…If you had a legitimate health concern causing the issue, and had reason to believe you have one, then by all means seek medical help. But in general, a doctor is not going to have expertise in how the fuck to help you with that problem. I am talking about those that get this regardless of food timing and ruling out low blood sugar (consuming carbs with the workout).

I have known numerous people throughout my years that have had this issue, including college football players, wrestlers, mma competitors, and plain old bodybuilders. It is something that some have to deal with. I have yet to see a solution, only training modifications that ease the feeling and minimize the frequency of hurling. If you have the magic answer, feel free to educate us all, shithead.[/quote]

thank you, i was going to rip into him for all the bullshit that he was spewing so im glad i kept reading the thread first. next he will say that your not supposed to work out so hard!?!?! WTF Buddy, stick to jazzercise and leave the hard core lifting for the men. When i work legs if i dont feel like puking and my legs dont give out from under me as i walk away from a set, im not doing enough!