T Nation

Work, Density, and Hypertrophy?

Ive been thinking about these lately, and had a few questions you guys might be able to answer.

Say my goal is to get stronger and bigger. And say I take a certain lift, and improve the amount of work I can do in a given time, will that mean i’ll be bigger?

For example:

Right now I can max DB snatch 100lbs, and can do an EDT style circuit with 75 lbs for 55 reps in 15 minutes.

If I keep improving, and get to where I can do 100lbs for 55 reps in 15 minutes, will I likely be bigger?

I know people always say that building muscle just comes down to eating a lot, but that never really worked for me, so im taking a different approach.

Instead of doing the typical bulking where you eat as much as possible, I try to eat based on how hungry i am, but make sure to eat healthy, clean, and a lot.

I found that I could get a bit more weight by bulking, but wasn’t able to maintain it in the long run.

So will an increase in maximum work performed in a specific amount of time be accompanied by increase in muscle size?

[quote]dankid wrote:
Ive been thinking about these lately, and had a few questions you guys might be able to answer.

Say my goal is to get stronger and bigger. And say I take a certain lift, and improve the amount of work I can do in a given time, will that mean i’ll be bigger?

For example:

Right now I can max DB snatch 100lbs, and can do an EDT style circuit with 75 lbs for 55 reps in 15 minutes.

If I keep improving, and get to where I can do 100lbs for 55 reps in 15 minutes, will I likely be bigger?

[/quote]

Yes.

The thing to do is to look around you at the big guys in your gym (or if you don’t have any, even looking at the big guys in youtube videos or in the magazines will do) and ask yourself what they have in common.

How many big guys do you see using density (EDT style) training and credit it as getting them big? Maybe a few, but not many. However, how many big guys are lifting some serious weight? Just about all of them that I’ve seen. Sure, some more than others, but all have significantly improved the amount of weight they use on their lifts since starting their training. That right there is the key as far as training goes.

By the way I’m not saying that EDT doesn’t work, or that the concept of doing more work in the same amount of time isn’t a viable one. All I’m saying is that the focus should be on increasing the weight. If I were you I’d pick a desired number of reps (say 50) and once I hit that mark, increase the weight.

You’re probably not going to see nearly as much of a difference a year from now if you went from being able to do 75lbs for 55 reps to being able to do 75lbs for 200 reps, compared to if you went from 75lbs for 55 reps to 150 lbs for 55 reps.

“Bulking” doesn’t necessarily mean “eating everything in sight”. If someone was extremely ectomorphic (naturally fast metabolism) then they are going to need to really eat and not worry as much about being as strict. If someone was endomorphic (naturally slow metabolism), they would have to be much more strict or their bf would get out of hand.

As long as your lifts continue to improve and you are gaining weight at what ever intervals you’re checking (bi-weekly, monthly, bi-monthly, etc…), or better yet just making sure you eat your 6-7 meals a day and getting in you protein (1.5-2grams/lb), you should be good to go.

[quote]
So will an increase in maximum work performed in a specific amount of time be accompanied by increase in muscle size?[/quote]

Yes, but I’d suggest focusing more on increasing the weight than on increasing the work in an amount of time primarily.

[quote]Sentoguy wrote:
So will an increase in maximum work performed in a specific amount of time be accompanied by increase in muscle size?

Yes, but I’d suggest focusing more on increasing the weight than on increasing the work in an amount of time primarily.[/quote]

KK, I meant to say an increase in work with a similar amount of reps, thus increase in weight. I just prefer the EDT template, because its fun, and the time limit helps regulate how much fatigue you’ll get.

***So is it basically safe to assume that if you can increase the amount of weight you can lift for moderate to high volumes, then you’ll likely be larger, as long as your past the newbie gains?

This is what Im basically doing now. Im alternating strength training and EDT, so that I can increase my max strength, and then when I go back to EDT, I use that new max to determine my weight for the pr-zone. So far this seems to be working well.

I do eat 5-7 meals a day, and I notice that when I start working out harder, I start eating more at each meal.

One of my goals is to increase the weight im using for the EDT circuits by 10%. I figure a 10% increase x about 50 reps is a fairly large increase in work, which should result in increases in size and muscular endurance.