T Nation

Why Train Pecs for Strength?

When playing a sport like football, the pecs are used all the time when pushing, hitting, and tackling. And, of course, for the babes.

Not sure if its been mentioned but also so you can pull /row big with now imbalance. Much like ppl who dont train back enough one could get an imbalance from not having strong enough pecks which them may lead to limits imbalance posture issues and limit strength in the upper back

Phill

You dont have to unless you want to. I sometimes bench for assisstance in upright presses. Otherwise Saxon and Sandow never benched… yet those guys were as strong as hell.

Why bench? Because the strength and power that you develop from benching applies to any outward pushing motion that you would do in real life, whether horizontal or standing. Haven’t you ever had to shove or push someone away from you? Just about every football program at any level places a strong emphasis on the bench for this very reason.

Is this a troll? Why train pecs? Because you want to! If you don’t - then don’t! Why make a “gotta” or “should” issue of it?

the body should be trained as one unit. failing to do so would never allow you to reach your potential. its like having a sprinter just train lower body, its not optimal and doesnt work well. train the whole body.

AC

[quote]sharetrader wrote:
Most of your power for punching comes from the hips.[/quote]
Not really in the jab, but also what’s the point in limiting your punching power by not training chest. If you train chest your punches will be that much stronger.

I love how this turned into a debate over the functionality of a strong pecs. Punching power?

Honestly, a lot of punching power comes from your hips and technique. Besides, throwing a punch involves so much of your musculature that your pectoral muscles won’t be that crucial of a factor.

You, the original poster, mentioned some reasons to train your pectorals. The main reason is if you want to. You said you were thinking of cutting back on flat bench work - go ahead. See how you like it, change it up. Focus on dip work, or overhead presses, or ANYTHING that you want. It’s YOUR training, experiment and learn something.

Another reason is to avoid imbalances, like one poster said. However, some people have pecs that are too strong when compared to their upper back. So do what you will, but don’t try to boil it down to some BS functionality debate about how it’s going to make you a strong puncher or good climber to dip yourself up that mountain.

[quote]duncanidaho wrote:
sharetrader wrote:
Most of your power for punching comes from the hips.
Not really in the jab, but also what’s the point in limiting your punching power by not training chest. If you train chest your punches will be that much stronger.

[/quote]

lol@ this

i realllllllllllly want to see you punch

I don’t think strength has too much of a connection to punching power, especially when it comes to bench pressing. The way I have always been taught is to relax the punch, especially in the upper body. Proper punch technique uses the hips and legs to generate power, the chest has little to nothing to do with it. Thats why guys like Bang Ludwig can throw KO punches with little muscle mass and no weight training.

That being said, I think full body training is important to include all muscles of the body, for fitness training, strength, and avoidance of imbalances that can produce injury. I do not, however, think the bench press is the best way to go about it.

[quote]Fitnessdiva wrote:
I don’t think strength has too much of a connection to punching power, especially when it comes to bench pressing. The way I have always been taught is to relax the punch, especially in the upper body. Proper punch technique uses the hips and legs to generate power, the chest has little to nothing to do with it. Thats why guys like Bang Ludwig can throw KO punches with little muscle mass and no weight training.

That being said, I think full body training is important to include all muscles of the body, for fitness training, strength, and avoidance of imbalances that can produce injury. I do not, however, think the bench press is the best way to go about it.[/quote]

See, now I have to add you as a friend. Good points.

BUT what about the back muscles. Doesn’t that have more to do with punching then chest?

If you’re talking posterior chain, I’d say yes.

Even though the pecs are not the most essential muscles for the bench press, they do play a role. You should train them, if for nothing else to prevent them being injured if things go sideways on a max bench.

How many times have we heard of people blowing out pecs on the bench press? Now, obviously poor form plays a major role, but my point is if you neglect an aspect of your musculature you can create imbalances and open it up for injury.

[quote]ultimatethor wrote:
Even though the pecs are not the most essential muscles for the bench press, they do play a role. You should train them, if for nothing else to prevent them being injured if things go sideways on a max bench.

How many times have we heard of people blowing out pecs on the bench press? Now, obviously poor form plays a major role, but my point is if you neglect an aspect of your musculature you can create imbalances and open it up for injury.

[/quote]

Best post on the subject.

God some people are retarded

For pushing shit obviously

[quote]Donut62 wrote:
There’s no such thing as a muscle that it is too strong, only other muscles that are too weak. I think the issue boils down to pecs being a relatively minor issue compared to the surrounding musculature. If your pecs lag, train them, if they aren’t then your pressing work is probably hitting them hard enough.[/quote]

Thank You, I was starting to loose faith in internet lifting sites.

Pecs dont push anything fucking thing people. They assist in breathing an in pulling you humorus bone forward like a crane. The muscles responsibe for pushing things are mainly the triceps, shoulders. The pecs help stabilize your shoulder girdle when bearing loads. They also assist in pull ups and pull downs too. What do you men by pec work anyway. Pec work alone would be shit like fly’s and crossovers. Benching is upper body work not pec work.

[quote]double1 wrote:
I love how this turned into a debate over the functionality of a strong pecs. Punching power?

Honestly, a lot of punching power comes from your hips and technique. Besides, throwing a punch involves so much of your musculature that your pectoral muscles won’t be that crucial of a factor.

You, the original poster, mentioned some reasons to train your pectorals. The main reason is if you want to. You said you were thinking of cutting back on flat bench work - go ahead. See how you like it, change it up. Focus on dip work, or overhead presses, or ANYTHING that you want. It’s YOUR training, experiment and learn something.

Another reason is to avoid imbalances, like one poster said. However, some people have pecs that are too strong when compared to their upper back. So do what you will, but don’t try to boil it down to some BS functionality debate about how it’s going to make you a strong puncher or good climber to dip yourself up that mountain.[/quote]

Thank you, your absolutley correct… I wish you could delete the randon bullshit answers on here, I really do

Why even have those muscles anyway?

I say you should have them surgically removed. They’re just a waste of space, and without them you can weight less, and that alone will make you more functional.

Same with any other useless muscle.

[quote]Gatorarmz wrote:
Pecs dont push anything fucking thing people. They assist in breathing an in pulling you humorus bone forward like a crane. The muscles responsibe for pushing things are mainly the triceps, shoulders. The pecs help stabilize your shoulder girdle when bearing loads. They also assist in pull ups and pull downs too. What do you men by pec work anyway. Pec work alone would be shit like fly’s and crossovers. Benching is upper body work not pec work.[/quote]

Triceps don’t push anything either. Muscles pull.