T Nation

Why Power Bodybuilders aren't Strong as Powerlifters?

They are much stronger than bodybuilders and almost strong as powerlifters but not at the same level!

By training both fibers 1 and 2a/2b affect strength capacity ? or is because they train less sets and pump muscles after heavy sets, i dont really understand! : )

It is because they train only once per week each muscle group ? instead training like powerlifters at least twice per week by focusing on bench/squat/deadlift only?

Please give an example of a ‘power body builder’ and their training. I shall respond back with a better message later today.

[quote]DSSG wrote:
Please give an example of a ‘power body builder’ and their training. I shall respond back with a better message later today.[/quote]

Monday morning: Quads
Squats 5-7 x 2-4 x 700+
Leg presses 4 x 10-12 x 2,000
Hack squats 4 x 10-12 x 800
Leg extensions 4 x 10 -12 x stack

Monday Afternoon: Hams
Lying leg curls 4 x 10-12 x stack
Seated leg curls 4 x 10-12 x stack
Walking lunges 4 x 10-12 x 225

Tuesday morning: Chest
I donâ??t count bench press sets until I get to around 500 pounds. When I hit my heavy weight, I do 5-7 sets of 2-4 reps:
Bench presses 5-7 x 2-4 x 500+
Incline barbell presses 4 x 8 x 455
Decline barbell presses 4 x 8 x 405
Flyes 4 x 8 x 140

Tuesday afternoon: Abs
Full decline situps with a 45 pound plate behind my head 3 x 10

Wednesday morning: Back
Deadlifts 7 x 2 x 700
Bent-over rows 4 x 8 x 455-495
Pullups 4 x 8 x 100-150 + bodyweight
Seated rows 4 x 8 x stack
Hyperextensions 4 x 8
Shrugs 4 x 8 x 800

Wednesday afternoon: Calves and abs
Calf raises 5 x 20
Full decline situps with a 45- pound plate behind my head 3 x 10

Thursday morning: Arms
45 degree incline curls 4 x 10 x 90s
Standing straight-bar curls 4 x 10 x 225
Preachers curls with EZ-curl bar 4 x 10 x 225
Close-grip bench presses 4 x 10 x 455
Pushdowns 4 x 10 x 180
Lying extensions 4 x 10 x 225

Thursday afternoon: Calves and abs
Calf raises 5 x 20
Full decline situps with a 45-
pound plate behind my head
3 x 10

Friday morning: Shoulders
Dumbbell clean and jerks 4 x 10 x 120s
Behind-the-neck presses 4 x 8 x 315
Narrow-grip upright rows 4 x 8 x 225
Front raises 4 x 10 x 60s
Rear-delt-machine laterals 4 x 10 x stack

This is a progam training from Mike O’Hearn! ,as you can see, he does deadlift/benchpress/squat 5-7 sets with 2-4 reps ,100% he does 1rep as well just like powerlifters ,he is strong, after all he was powerlifter before but he could be way stronger !

Stan Efferding

nuff said

Powerlifters train their nervous system with the patterns, but not necessarily their muscles (at least not for hypertrophy) so a “power bodybuilder” would have bigger looking muscles relative to their nervous strength because they do more hypertrophy work. My $ .02

I don’t know a single “power bodybuilder” that trains twice a day.

Funny thing is that all elite bodybuilders come from a powerlifting background. Ronnie Colman and Mike O’Hearn are one of the best in their fields. It’s because simply put it, power lifts create muscle foundation. Of course there are those powerlifters who care about cardio and looking nice and w/e but if you see the really big guys putting up 1000 pound squats and fucking like 800 bench, they don’t care about a six pack. They’re goal is to lift the bar and the weight on it. I’m a beginner in powerlifting but its quickly become an obsession of mine.

Bodybuilders have a lot more to maintain such as their body fat percentage, theyre diet is very strict and they pretty much starve themselves close to competition time. Powerlifter’s diet really is eat healthy and enough calories to support muscle growth and recovery.

Bodybuilders train to grow muscle not necessarily to make it strong. That sounds weird but if you think about it for a second, it makes sense. You can bloat and stretch your muscle fibers with volume and you’ll get that
“pump”. That’s the entire essence of bodybuilding exercises. It is to get pump and increase the mass of the muscle. By doing that your muscles grow and with a good cardio and diet, you body fat is low. Thats why you can see more muscle in a bodybuilder than a powerlifter. If one of these elite lifters ever decide to cut down 50 pounds they would be monsters in the bodybuilding arena.

All the most competitive PLers under 200lb seem to be really lean. It’s starting to get where even the lower half of 200 is getting really lean. The more of that mass is the force producing tissue muscle, the greater the contractile area is and the more poundage that can be put up with all else being equal.

[quote]younjs wrote:
Funny thing is that all elite bodybuilders come from a powerlifting background. Ronnie Colman and Mike O’Hearn are one of the best in their fields. It’s because simply put it, power lifts create muscle foundation. Of course there are those powerlifters who care about cardio and looking nice and w/e but if you see the really big guys putting up 1000 pound squats and fucking like 800 bench, they don’t care about a six pack. They’re goal is to lift the bar and the weight on it. I’m a beginner in powerlifting but its quickly become an obsession of mine.

Bodybuilders have a lot more to maintain such as their body fat percentage, theyre diet is very strict and they pretty much starve themselves close to competition time. Powerlifter’s diet really is eat healthy and enough calories to support muscle growth and recovery.

Bodybuilders train to grow muscle not necessarily to make it strong. That sounds weird but if you think about it for a second, it makes sense. You can bloat and stretch your muscle fibers with volume and you’ll get that
“pump”. That’s the entire essence of bodybuilding exercises. It is to get pump and increase the mass of the muscle. By doing that your muscles grow and with a good cardio and diet, you body fat is low. Thats why you can see more muscle in a bodybuilder than a powerlifter. If one of these elite lifters ever decide to cut down 50 pounds they would be monsters in the bodybuilding arena. [/quote]

no not all great bodybuilders have a powerlifting background. yates, heathe and cuttler come to mind yet none of them were powerlifters.

most elite heavy weight powerlifters diets are not healthy. there is nothing healthy about being over 300lbs with high levels of bodyfat…

your muscles dont grow by simply getting a massive pump. they grow by breaking down the muscle fibers and then providing the nutrients for them to rebuild and grow.

just NO, not all huge powerlifters would be “monsters” in the bodybuilding arena. there is alot more to bodybuilding than just mass.

i understand nothing of this! what bodybuilding have to do with power bodybuilding? im talking about power here, not HOW GREAT U GOING TO LOOK from power bodybuilding

[quote]ryan.b_96 wrote:

[quote]younjs wrote:
Funny thing is that all elite bodybuilders come from a powerlifting background. Ronnie Colman and Mike O’Hearn are one of the best in their fields. It’s because simply put it, power lifts create muscle foundation. Of course there are those powerlifters who care about cardio and looking nice and w/e but if you see the really big guys putting up 1000 pound squats and fucking like 800 bench, they don’t care about a six pack. They’re goal is to lift the bar and the weight on it. I’m a beginner in powerlifting but its quickly become an obsession of mine.

Bodybuilders have a lot more to maintain such as their body fat percentage, theyre diet is very strict and they pretty much starve themselves close to competition time. Powerlifter’s diet really is eat healthy and enough calories to support muscle growth and recovery.

Bodybuilders train to grow muscle not necessarily to make it strong. That sounds weird but if you think about it for a second, it makes sense. You can bloat and stretch your muscle fibers with volume and you’ll get that
“pump”. That’s the entire essence of bodybuilding exercises. It is to get pump and increase the mass of the muscle. By doing that your muscles grow and with a good cardio and diet, you body fat is low. Thats why you can see more muscle in a bodybuilder than a powerlifter. If one of these elite lifters ever decide to cut down 50 pounds they would be monsters in the bodybuilding arena. [/quote]

no not all great bodybuilders have a powerlifting background. yates, heathe and cuttler come to mind yet none of them were powerlifters.

most elite heavy weight powerlifters diets are not healthy. there is nothing healthy about being over 300lbs with high levels of bodyfat…

your muscles dont grow by simply getting a massive pump. they grow by breaking down the muscle fibers and then providing the nutrients for them to rebuild and grow.

just NO, not all huge powerlifters would be “monsters” in the bodybuilding arena. there is alot more to bodybuilding than just mass.
[/quote]

You’re right about the ALL bodybuilders. I just wanted to point out that those who were powerlifters do well if they can transition into bodybuilding. From what I understand, muscle fibers tear and grow from the pumps. Am I wrong on that? I know mass comes from muscle fibers breaking down and recovering.

You don’t think that powerlifters with their massive bodies won’t do well in bodybuilding if they drop their body fat percentages down and spending a little time to developing a few smaller muscles?

The dumb answer is: different goals. Logically, a lifter who mostly trains for strength but also for looks probably won’t get as far (strength-wise) as one who trains entirely for strength, all else being equal. Insert trite saying about trying to catch too many rabbits here.

[quote]younjs wrote:
Funny thing is that all elite bodybuilders come from a powerlifting background.[/quote]
This is 100% incorrect. “All” elite bodybuilder most certainly do not have powerlifting backgrounds. Some? Sure. All? No way. The argument could be made that there have been more examples of Olympic weightlifters becoming successful bodybuilders than PLers turned successful bodybuilders.

I’d say a powerlifter-turned-bodybuilder doesn’t have that much of an advantage over an Olympic lifter-turned-bodybuilder or competitive strongman-turned-bodybuilder.

[quote]If one of these elite lifters ever decide to cut down 50 pounds they would be monsters in the bodybuilding arena.

You don’t think that powerlifters with their massive bodies won’t do well in bodybuilding if they drop their body fat percentages down and spending a little time to developing a few smaller muscles?[/quote]
Powerlifting does leave gaps and weak points that definitely need to be addressed before competitive bodybuilding. Like Ryan was saying, it’s not as simple as getting a 2,000 pound powerlifting total, then cutting/training “like a bodybuilder” for 16 weeks and winning contests right off the bat.

[quote]Made in Holland wrote:
Stan Efferding

nuff said[/quote]
'Nuff said… if you’re trying to make a case of the problem with powerlifters “becoming” bodybuilders. His physique, from a bodybuilding perspective, is gnarly. And not in a good way.

[quote]Apoklyps wrote:
The most simple answer is: different goals.[/quote]
Fixed.