T Nation

Why Do I Squat More than I Deadlift?


#1

It's really bugging me and I can't get to the root of the cause. The difference is about 55lbs. I'm 6 feet 182lbs. Everyone I know deadlifts more than they squat but could it be possible i'm just better at squatting? Weak hamstrings? Weak glutes?


#2

What are your numbers? It’s hard to tell what’s wrong without seeing the lifts. Muscle imbalances and bad leverages make a big difference. The relative difference could also be fine. The squat/deadlift ratio would likely change once you’re in the 210-230 lb range and lean, which is roughly the weight that fills out your height. The 220 lb weight class is where squat and deadlift numbers are pretty close. Lighter lifters typically have a bigger deadlift and heavier lifters typically have a bigger squat.


#3

[quote]Justliftbrah wrote:
It’s really bugging me and I can’t get to the root of the cause. The difference is about 55lbs. I’m 6 feet 182lbs. Everyone I know deadlifts more than they squat but could it be possible i’m just better at squatting? Weak hamstrings? Weak glutes?[/quote]

Here’s some questions:

Do you put in the amount of effort into deadlift as squat? Do you half ass your workouts? Do you spend less effort with your deadlift programming? Do you skip deadlift days? Do you squat more frequently than deadlifting? Do you bullshit your deadlift accessory work?


#4

How do you fail on deadlift? Is it grip?


#5

the only way to get an accurate answer is to post a video of your DL and your current training routine. how long have you been lifting? are you conventional or sumo?


#6

Without video it’s impossible to know for certain, and this doesn’t apply to EVERYONE, but the first thing I would always check is your squat depth.

Many a kid has been crestfallen to learn that their “400” squat is actually about eight inches high, and this explains why they’re squatting “400” and deadlifting 315.


#7

[quote]ActivitiesGuy wrote:
Without video it’s impossible to know for certain, and this doesn’t apply to EVERYONE, but the first thing I would always check is your squat depth.

Many a kid has been crestfallen to learn that their “400” squat is actually about eight inches high, and this explains why they’re squatting “400” and deadlifting 315.[/quote]

This is usually the answer to this question. Occasionally it can boil down to other factors (weak grip, years spent squatting and powercleaning in football but no time spent deadlifting, lupus), but this is the sort of occam’s razor answer.


#8

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]ActivitiesGuy wrote:
Without video it’s impossible to know for certain, and this doesn’t apply to EVERYONE, but the first thing I would always check is your squat depth.

Many a kid has been crestfallen to learn that their “400” squat is actually about eight inches high, and this explains why they’re squatting “400” and deadlifting 315.[/quote]

This is usually the answer to this question. Occasionally it can boil down to other factors (weak grip, years spent squatting and powercleaning in football but no time spent deadlifting, lupus), but this is the sort of occam’s razor answer.[/quote]

x3 on this. Unless your grip is failing on deadlifts, you’re likely just squatting high.


#9

personal experience…fat = bigger squat, less deadlift
my belly gets in my way of pulling when i get up there, throwing leverages off kilter


#10

[quote]BigDawg6593 wrote:
personal experience…fat = bigger squat, less deadlift
my belly gets in my way of pulling when i get up there, throwing leverages off kilter[/quote]

He’s 6’, 180 lbs. I doubt this is the case here.


#11

try switching to sumo


#12

[quote]flipcollar wrote:

[quote]BigDawg6593 wrote:
personal experience…fat = bigger squat, less deadlift
my belly gets in my way of pulling when i get up there, throwing leverages off kilter[/quote]

He’s 6’, 180 lbs. I doubt this is the case here.[/quote]

Yep, didn’t even look at that…moving on


#13

[quote]flipcollar wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]ActivitiesGuy wrote:
Without video it’s impossible to know for certain, and this doesn’t apply to EVERYONE, but the first thing I would always check is your squat depth.

Many a kid has been crestfallen to learn that their “400” squat is actually about eight inches high, and this explains why they’re squatting “400” and deadlifting 315.[/quote]

This is usually the answer to this question. Occasionally it can boil down to other factors (weak grip, years spent squatting and powercleaning in football but no time spent deadlifting, lupus), but this is the sort of occam’s razor answer.[/quote]

x3 on this. Unless your grip is failing on deadlifts, you’re likely just squatting high.[/quote]

Yep. Are your legs super short? I could see how that might help your squat leverages.


#14

[quote]ActivitiesGuy wrote:
Without video it’s impossible to know for certain, and this doesn’t apply to EVERYONE, but the first thing I would always check is your squat depth.

Many a kid has been crestfallen to learn that their “400” squat is actually about eight inches high, and this explains why they’re squatting “400” and deadlifting 315.[/quote]

I’m an advocate for deep squatting so believe me i’m not quarter squatting. You’ll just have to take my word for it, either way it wouldn’t do me any good to lie. Anyways I deadlift once a week. Someone told me to spread my legs out as much as possible while still keeping it a conventional deadlift. That way my glute muscles would get activated more.


#15

[quote]Justliftbrah wrote:

[quote]ActivitiesGuy wrote:
Without video it’s impossible to know for certain, and this doesn’t apply to EVERYONE, but the first thing I would always check is your squat depth.

Many a kid has been crestfallen to learn that their “400” squat is actually about eight inches high, and this explains why they’re squatting “400” and deadlifting 315.[/quote]

I’m an advocate for deep squatting so believe me i’m not quarter squatting. You’ll just have to take my word for it, either way it wouldn’t do me any good to lie. Anyways I deadlift once a week. Someone told me to spread my legs out as much as possible while still keeping it a conventional deadlift. That way my glute muscles would get activated more.
[/quote]

Try shifting your stance in a whole bunch - shoulder width or narrower (I like to start with feet under the hip socket and then work outwards to shoulder width if you need to. You could also try starting with higher hips - your back may be a bunch stronger than you think.


#16

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]ActivitiesGuy wrote:
Without video it’s impossible to know for certain, and this doesn’t apply to EVERYONE, but the first thing I would always check is your squat depth.

Many a kid has been crestfallen to learn that their “400” squat is actually about eight inches high, and this explains why they’re squatting “400” and deadlifting 315.[/quote]

This is usually the answer to this question. Occasionally it can boil down to other factors (weak grip, years spent squatting and powercleaning in football but no time spent deadlifting, lupus)[/quote]

It’s never lupus.


#17

[quote]Aragorn wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]ActivitiesGuy wrote:
Without video it’s impossible to know for certain, and this doesn’t apply to EVERYONE, but the first thing I would always check is your squat depth.

Many a kid has been crestfallen to learn that their “400” squat is actually about eight inches high, and this explains why they’re squatting “400” and deadlifting 315.[/quote]

This is usually the answer to this question. Occasionally it can boil down to other factors (weak grip, years spent squatting and powercleaning in football but no time spent deadlifting, lupus)[/quote]

It’s never lupus.[/quote]

Thank you for getting the reference.