T Nation

Why Do Blacks Blindly Follow Obama

As a black person, I am around other blacks all the time and it is amazing how many blacks follow Obama just mindlessly. I remember during the election day, people that I know who had never voted in their life or cared remotely about politics broke their necks to vote for Obama. Yet they knew nothing about him.

Another thing is that to alot of african americans, nothing Obama does is wrong. If Obama flashed a group of little old ladies today, blacks would be lining up to defend his actions. You know during election time, a group went to Harlem. Harlem is the black community of New York City. They passed off John McCain’s ideas as Obamas, and every one agreed with them as long as they thought it was an Obama idea.

Well, it is an interesting question. Sensitive, but interesting. I really think it would be a good thing to study but you are going to have to really drill down on our brethren who have dark skin. It’s something as a non-black I notice, but don’t dare say anything.
It was the same kind of thing when Michael Vick came to Atlanta. Now don’t get me wrong, dude did his time and I am willing to let bygones be bygones, but some people, who were black, treated the man as if he were a hero. That I don’t get. He did nothing heroic.

Here’s the problem with the whole thing, it’s something that people see, but cannot talk about. It’s incredibly taboo. But by observation, it appears to a reality of some sort. We cannot just say though, that “black people support obama blindly, because he is black” or “black people like Michael Vick because he is black”. While that may be true for some, but for others that may not be so. There are also plenty of black people who like obama because of his politics and policies. Not only blacks but plenty of others like him too, he is still a popular guy. So I guess you have to seprate those who like obama’s politics from those who like his skin color and then delve into it…

I don’t know where this is going to go, somebody is going to get plenty pissed off you ever brought it up, but I appreciate the balls you have for doing so…It is not an irrelevant topic. And I personally do not think that race should be a consideration for anything other than whether certain color clothes match your skin.

Collectivism.

Eh… an overreaction to centuries of not thinking having a black man as president was possible. And I don’t know that blacks agree unequivocally… making sweeping generalizations is dangerous like that because they’re generally false.

Maybe they just agree with his politics? I wouldn’t take anything that some TV station does like that to heart.

This question should be pretty easy to answer. He is the first black president, he will get a pass on anything.

And what IS the deal with airline food?!

[quote]Rational Gaze wrote:
And what IS the deal with airline food?![/quote]

Hey that’s not nice they work very hard on that food.

I am meeting blacks in the suburban Detroit area, working class and a couple business owners for whom this is not true. They are rapidly recognizing that black skin did not translate into good policy as a matter of course. One guy didn’t vote for him and is now being profoundly vindicated.

There are also several largely black churches in the city that I know of who were screaming from the rooftops during the campaign that this guy was not their friend.

All that said it is undeniably true that Obama continues to hold sway over vast numbers of black Americans. Why? Because they have been taken in by the horrendously destructive politics of group rather than principle identification.

When see yourself as black, white, hispanic, arabic, female (yes, even female), or outer Mongolian hermaphrodites between 5 and 6 feet tall who are allergic to peanuts before you are a human being then you are susceptible to endless manipulation by people cunning enough to prey upon that mindset.

When you believe in a set of principles wholly unrelated to any the above then your allies of those who also hold those principles regardless of their any of the above. In a nutshell.

Jeremiah Wright is a preacher of group identity politics. The aforementioned Detroit churches define their truth by principles that transcend race and group identity and were hence not subject to the “a black Whitehouse is automatically good” syndrome. To give an example.

Every Detroit church I know of supported Obama. Despite his stance on abortion and gay rights, which the black church has historically opposed. I listened to the Rush Limbaugh show one day and he was talking about Obama and a black woman called in. During their conversatiion, he asked her if Obama could do anything wrong in her eyes, which she replied that no he couldnt.

I know there are blacks that will criticize Obama, if its something to criticize, but the majority of blacks I meet, and listen to on the radio, like Steve Harvey or Michael Baisden, would never criticize anything Obama did. And alot of black people that praise Obama, felt like George Bush was the anti-christ and that everything he did was wrong, no matter how right it was, simply because he’s George Bush.

A recent Rasmussen poll has Obama’s approval rating among African-Americans to be 95%.

One can speculate as to whether this is due to actual near-uniformity in political opinion as to what policies are desirable and which are not; or for some other reason.

While I appreciate for some that the answer may appear obvious, it’s complicated by the fact that election results historically commonly show blacks voting 95% or higher for the Democrat in cases where the Democrat is not black.

The true answer may be an overwhelmingly pro-Democrat tendency that actually is at a near-uniformity (exceptions obviously exist, but apparently only a few percent) perhaps combined with racial favoritism.

Perhaps a better insight could be gained into it from having data from past cases where a non-black Democrat President’s approval ratings among non-blacks were around 40% or less, and seeing what the approval ratings among blacks were. Survey reporters rarely, it seems to me, provide the racial breakdown of their findings, so that data might be hard to come by. If one found past cases of very high (90%) approval rating among blacks for Democrat Presidents while their overall approval rating was below 50%, then that would largely rule out racial favoritism as a necessary cause and support pro-Democrat tendency as the primary cause.

Are you serious in asking this question.

Tribalism?

V

[quote]horsepuss wrote:
Are you serious in asking this question.[/quote]

Very serious.

[quote]clip11 wrote:
Every Detroit church I know of supported Obama. Despite his stance on abortion and gay rights, which the black church has historically opposed. I listened to the Rush Limbaugh show one day and he was talking about Obama and a black woman called in. During their conversatiion, he asked her if Obama could do anything wrong in her eyes, which she replied that no he couldnt.

I know there are blacks that will criticize Obama, if its something to criticize, but the majority of blacks I meet, and listen to on the radio, like Steve Harvey or Michael Baisden, would never criticize anything Obama did. And alot of black people that praise Obama, felt like George Bush was the anti-christ and that everything he did was wrong, no matter how right it was, simply because he’s George Bush.[/quote]

Give am 1500 a listen. I don’t know their schedule though. Don’t get me wrong. I said several and there are hundreds of mostly black churches in Detroit so the % is small. I was citing that source to make a point about the difference between identifying with a group based on something like race and identifying with a worldview based on principles.

There was one black Detroit area preacher on during the campaign, can’t remember his name now, Earl something I think, I posted about it at the time, but anyway, WOOOOWEEEEE!!! This guy was blasting Obama with a biblical and historical carpet bombing campaign that rivaled anything Limbaugh or Levin could ever muster. The point is that Obama zombie-ism is not universal among black people.

Bill makes a good point about blacks and democrats too. However that sentiment is not universal either as he points out. If you want to see some blacks and other “minorities” who really break the mold see here:
http://gregnmary.gotdns.com:8080/index.php/topic,102.0.html
I posted this in another thread as well actually.

[quote]Vegita wrote:
Tribalism?

V[/quote]

Are you suggesting that some populations have not thrown off the mantle of the tribe? :wink:

I’ll buy that and state that is probably true of all close knit, community based cultures and why certain localities tend to swing one way politically or an other.

It is not a strange concept that people will seek some comfort in commonality – even if those commonalities are only skin deep.

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:
<<< It is not a strange concept that people will seek some comfort in commonality – even if those commonalities are only skin deep.[/quote]

There is some insight in this. Why do people have a sense loyalty to their hometown, state or country for instance? Analytically speaking, what difference does it make, yet most people have some level of affection for the place of their birth. It seems to be human nature.

However in a case like the situation at hand, blacks have been campaigning and voting for WHITE liberals for decades despite the devastating results to themselves so it does become a bit more complex. Obama is a marxist first, a kinda black person next, a citizen of the world after that and somewhere down there on the list has some personal history with the United States.

Millions of people, not just blacks, failed to recognize one of the ultra left faithful during the campaign and thought they were electing the first black president. A fact that his handlers played to the hilt. His “blackness” is almost incidental, even to him. It’s the quest for communist style social justice with himself at the helm that drives him. Race is just a convenient instrument having been primed by 40 plus years of incessant conditioning.

I don’t think this is limited only to blacks. I bet if there was a promising Hispanic/Latino candidate or a promising Asian candidate, that candidate would get the majority of votes from that race.

What I think is the bigger issue is that too many people vote for superficial reasons. In 2008, I asked a number of my friends why they were voting for/supporting Obama. The overwhelming response: they didn’t like Bush. When I asked why they didn’t like Bush and what specifically on Obama’s platform they agreed with, I seldom got a straight answer. I think a lot of it has to do with the media. “According to CNN, Bush’s approval rating is going down, so he must suck.” “All these celebrities are supporting Obama, so I should too.” etc.

Given, my generation (18-25) is more concerned with partying and hooking up, but I think the same can be said for older folks, although to a much lesser degree.

Not Asian

[quote]Bill Roberts wrote:

The true answer may be an overwhelmingly pro-Democrat tendency that actually is at a near-uniformity (exceptions obviously exist, but apparently only a few percent) perhaps combined with racial favoritism.
[/quote]
I think this is spot on. I figured it was just because Obama’s black (for many blacks, obviously not all, liberal or conservative), but I didn’t think of the very pro-Democrat possibility.

[quote]clip11 wrote:

[quote]horsepuss wrote:
Are you serious in asking this question.[/quote]

Very serious.[/quote]

Black people blindly follow Obama because he is black, they are black and he is black.You seeing where im going with this.I would love to know how many african americans voted for the very first time just because Obama is black.