T Nation

Who's Doing What They Love

I’m not, well I’m not anymore hence I’m back in college. As of today I was going to be a major in Economics. I’m an idiot. I don’t know why I picked that but its not me. I tried being the “financial guy” but it just bores me to death. So, here I am with all of my college gen-ed requirements out of the way with no major yet.

I still have time obviously but I need to choose wisely. Judging from my contributions to this site its easy to see I’m more inclined to the creative field than anything. I’m looking in the film/TV direction or the golf direction, in that order. For golf it would be a management position of some sort.

Currently I’m a graphic designer and have been for the past 17 years (I’m 31). Its boring now. It may be the job I’m in, I’ve been here for 14 years, basically my only job. I make decent bank, I’m able to make T-Park, I can adjust my hours to suit my school (and golf) requirements but its just not there anymore. Its a drag ass situation to get myself in there every morning. Its just flat out boring.

The only downfall, my current school offers dick in either direction! If I choose the film direction my tuition would more than double. Then they question of “Do I want to go into debt” comes into play.

Who’s lucky enough to be doing what they love? Was it what you went to school for? If its what you love, was the passion there from an early age or did it show its head later?

[quote]PGA wrote:
The only downfall, my current school offers dick in either direction! [/quote]

Well, definitly dont come to SHU, then.

I’m back in school pursuing a masters degree in Sport Management. It’s a field I’ve always been interested in, it’s something I love, and when I’m done, I know wherever I work I will be happy, and I will love it. I might even pursue a PhD in Sport Management upon completion of my masters.

But it took me several years to figure this out. I worked in clothing retail through college, and after completing my undergrad, I worked in retail management for 4 years before realizing this is not what I want to do for the rest of my life, so I went back to school to do something I love.

PGA, you should DEFINITELY pursue the film degree. So what if the tuition doubles? You will be happy doing it, and all of us here at T-Nation know you are good at it (eg. T-Park). You have the skills and the talent, make the most of it. If you pursue another field, you will go through college wondering why you didn’t pursue film, and will be miserable, and back at square one.

You only live once, make the most of it.

[quote]PGA wrote:
I’m not, well I’m not anymore hence I’m back in college. As of today I was going to be a major in Economics. I’m an idiot. I don’t know why I picked that but its not me. I tried being the “financial guy” but it just bores me to death. So, here I am with all of my college gen-ed requirements out of the way with no major yet.

I still have time obviously but I need to choose wisely. Judging from my contributions to this site its easy to see I’m more inclined to the creative field than anything. I’m looking in the film/TV direction or the golf direction, in that order. For golf it would be a management position of some sort.

Currently I’m a graphic designer and have been for the past 17 years (I’m 31). Its boring now. It may be the job I’m in, I’ve been here for 14 years, basically my only job. I make decent bank, I’m able to make T-Park, I can adjust my hours to suit my school (and golf) requirements but its just not there anymore. Its a drag ass situation to get myself in there every morning. Its just flat out boring.

The only downfall, my current school offers dick in either direction! If I choose the film direction my tuition would more than double. Then they question of “Do I want to go into debt” comes into play.

Who’s lucky enough to be doing what they love? Was it what you went to school for? If its what you love, was the passion there from an early age or did it show its head later?[/quote]

Ive changed directions so many times its hard to count.

I originally started of wanting to be a physical therapist. However, the prospect of working with the elderly and the completely untrained slob who is bitching about bad knees despite the fact he/she is 300 lbs pushed me away. Yea, maybe I might be lucky enough to work with athletes. Maybe. So I quit.

I moved into pharmacy. I gave it a run. I finished my gen ed’s and had a 3.1 GPA at Wayne State in Detroit. Despite my decent grades and a 612 on my PCATS, I couldn’t get into pre pharm school. I quickly got sick of school and basically Detroit in general. Dropped out.

I have just recently at the age of 27 started back at Eastern Michigan University. Business school. Im looking to bust into the sales industry hardcore. Probably something medical related because Im knowledgable and interested in such. Maybe even work for a supplement industry, or something HRT/anti aging related as well?

Im looking to be a cut throat, intense, take no shit or prisoners in the sales world. Yea, Im pretty excited and Ive got a feeling that I finally found my way. I think my extremely healthy lifestyle, both to exercise and food, my addiction to reading(I go threw books like water) and HRT program dedication at a young age will give me a tremendous advantage over everyone else. Im currently working as a server in fine dining. Its actually VERY good training to to have. Ive learned speaking skills, social skills and public speaking and interacting all from serving tables. Can you tell Im competitive, LOL?

Either way, just find your way. Take a long hard look at what you really want to do and you will soon get it. I would suggest you start reading alot of books. There are many that will help you on your way. It worked for me.

At the risk of sounding like capt obvious here:

The trick is to find what you love then rise to the top of your field because you love it and then you will always be able to find work becasue good workers are hard to find.

(Frank Sanatra said don’t chase money chase excellence.)

I really believe that the prize goes to the hard worker. Maybe you don’t always get rewarded for hard work, but everyone I know who is successful has REALLY busted ass. (They also didn’t really seem to mind doing it either.)

A friend of mine said he read a report that says to really excel at something you got to bust ass for about 10-15 years. A lot of people never realize their dreams because they dont have the endurance to slog it out for a decade and a half.

I used to hate every job I had and I thought there was something wrong with me. But then I found a job I like and that made all the difference in the world.

(I went back to college when I was 28 and finished when I was 35, so it’s never too late to go back.)

Whatever you do, don’t go to college for film/direction. It’s a complete waste of time and money that would better spent by actually writing a script and shooting it.

[quote]dude-dilly squat wrote:
At the risk of sounding like capt obvious here:

The trick is to find what you love then rise to the top of your field because you love it and then you will always be able to find work becasue good workers are hard to find.

(Frank Sanatra said don’t chase money chase excellence.)

I really believe that the prize goes to the hard worker. Maybe you don’t always get rewarded for hard work, but everyone I know who is successful has REALLY busted ass. (They also didn’t really seem to mind doing it either.)

A friend of mine said he read a report that says to really excel at something you got to bust ass for about 10-15 years. A lot of people never realize their dreams because they dont have the endurance to slog it out for a decade and a half.

I used to hate every job I had and I thought there was something wrong with me. But then I found a job I like and that made all the difference in the world.

(I went back to college when I was 28 and finished when I was 35, so it’s never too late to go back.)

[/quote]

Good companies are so hard to find. Almost all employers just take advantage of hard workers instead of rewarding them.

Then when the hard worker gets fed up and finds another job, his employer is all too ready to counter offer, but then it is too late.

I do not like corporations. I think they are evil entities.

The way I am starting to look at it is that all jobs suck. They are inconvenient. No matter how much you enjoy whatever work it is, there is always something that is just going to get on your nerves.

Even something as basic as having to put hours in. The thing is you do it because you get paid for it. I don’t think many people would continue doing whatever their job is if they ceased getting paid.

Therefore, I just care about getting paid. The more I get paid, the happier I am with the inconvenience the job has on my life.

[quote]T-Nick wrote:
(I go threw books like water) [/quote]

Did anyone else find this line slightly ironic?

Don’t most of us just work so we can do what we really love in our off time?

I think only trust fund babies really love what they are doing.

Of course there could be a rare exception. Like the dude that oils Vida Guerra’s butt.

[quote]Doug Adams wrote:
Whatever you do, don’t go to college for film/direction. It’s a complete waste of time and money that would better spent by actually writing a script and shooting it. [/quote]

I’ve heard that before and I don’t agree with it. There is a ton of education out there to be had at a good film school. Also the networking that it gives is a tremendous benefit.

While a degree isn’t necessary getting all of the education from one place is huge.

I am DEFINITELY not ruling out the possibility of using the money and attending various workshops. But having a degree makes taking steps back a bit easier say if I want to work in TV, etc.

[quote]Petedacook wrote:
Good companies are so hard to find. Almost all employers just take advantage of hard workers instead of rewarding them. Then when the hard worker gets fed up and finds another job, his employer is all too ready to counter offer, but then it is too late.[/quote]

I understand what you are saying (I had this happen at many jobs), but I think the worker who deals with this hasn’t found his or her true calling/niche yet.

When the work itself is its own reward it becomes hard to take advantage of the worker. Also, when you are at the top of your field it’s just different.

(I dont say that as someone at the top of his field but more of an observer or people at the top of their field.)

I love my job. And I often have to catch myself because it sounds like I am gloating. But my point is that if you dont love your job, you haven’t found your calling yet.

That is your modern hero’s journey.

Society doesn’t care if you answer your calling. It wants you to be a good consumer. And there is nothing wrong with that except it will distract you from your true calling.

So many distractions in America!

[quote]MaloVerde wrote:
Don’t most of us just work so we can do what we really love in our off time?

I think only trust fund babies really love what they are doing.

Of course there could be a rare exception. Like the dude that oils Vida Guerra’s butt. [/quote]

Malo,

Try the book “The Flow.” “Psychology of Winning” is good too.

Great books!

Accoding to the authors, the key is to find work that you love that contributes to society. That is life’s challenge to everyone.

That is basically the key to a happy life. Everything else will take care of itself.

Okay, I’ll get off my soap box.

I just started back to school last semester. I decided on a career change and I’m studying for my B.S. in nutrition…

I pulled a 4.0 last semester and I couldn’t be happier to have the opportunity to pursue a field I love. I plan to keep my grades up, plow through to my Bachelors and then eventually a Masters.

If you’ve gotta work (which most of us do) at least do something you enjoy.

So yes, in response to the thread title, I’m doing what I love and enjoying school, and I’ll be in a profession I enjoy when I’m done. : )

[quote]rrjc5488 wrote:
T-Nick wrote:
(I go threw books like water)

Did anyone else find this line slightly ironic?[/quote]

I find that proper grammer on an online forum to be as usefull as tits on a nun.

Im an extremely jumpy, excited person. I get so manic with my ideas that my hands literally can’t type out fast enough, nor do I have the patience to look up words or write in proper sentence structure, unless its for english class.

Im the poster boy for generation ADD.

Interesting thread idea PGA.

Currently, I am doing what I love, and it’s exactly what I went to college for. My days go by quickly, and Sunday nights are not at all depressing.

However, although the money I make is certainly respectable, especially for being in the fitness industry, I have just gone back to grad school to head in a different direction.

My choice of choosing to focus primarily on Corporate Fitness has allowed me to develop some relationships with powerful people in said corporations.

The 'ol “it’s who you know” thing has come into play, and with a little additional education in a field completely un-related to my undergrad, my salary will almost double, and my work hours will decrease.

The lifestyle I like to lead demands a higher than average salary, yet the conflict between ‘doing what I love’ and ‘making more money’ is something I won’t be sure of until I make the switch.

I’m in a state of change much like you. I’m young, so I don’t have much advice, but I obviously hope you manage to find a job that you both love AND is financially rewarding, which is of course the ultimate goal.

Oh, and put me in your movies if you become a bigwig in the film industry.

I started school a few years ago for mechanical engineering, but had to quit to keep working and living.

I am doing what I love. I love working with my hands and using my head. I’ve been employed with a company building commercial refrigeration systems in supermarkets and warehouse stores for the past few months.

I like building things that I can look back on and say- “I had a part in that.”. I’ve done that with a few other things in life too. A tree company, a consulting business, a bunch of houses.

Not too glamorous, but I like it.

I might recomend a book for you, it’s called “Die Broke” by Pollan and Levine. The recomend doing the job that pays the most and finding your internal satisfaction on your free time. It’s worth a look. It’s available pretty cheap if you look around.

I grew up living next to a great man. He has spent the better portion of his live literally getting the shit beat out of him at the mine. Two months ago, he said something to me that fits in with this topic.

He said, 'There are three factors that determine whether you’ll end up happy. The first is: you have to like what you do for a living. You don’t have to love it, you don’t have to need it or even want to go to it, you simply only need to like it. If you don’t like your job, or worse, if you hate your job…move on.

Second: you need to be happy with where you live. If you aren’t…move.

And third: you have to make enough money to do either of the first two. If you don’t…find a job that allows for this.’

Long story short, I’m now off to the mine! Lol, ain’t life a series of disapointments intermixed with half a dozen great moments.

I am living my dream, at 44 my life is the best ever. 5 years ago I quit being a Mill Wright, and became a full time pastor of my own church.

I also coach the weights program at a large area high school.(about 2000 kids)I write all the programs and personally coach the varsity football players.

I also coach 10 lifters who train and compete with me. I have a daughter who is a college freshman and my son is going to be a junior in high school next year. Two major things are the reason why my life is awesome: God, and my loving wife of 21 years, without God or my wife my life would no be what it is, so the moral of this story is believe and trust in Jesus Christ, and find yourself a good woman who will encourage and stand by you, and your dreams.

George