T Nation

Who Makes Curry?

And how do you make it? I pretty much just skip the rice and it fits into my diet. I love the shit.

I’ve since moved from my favorite place that supplied enough chicken yellow curry for $5 that you could eat until fat dumb and happy.

I miss it to death and need to make my own. I’ve tried twice and have been less than impressed.

All recipes welcome, lower the carbs the better.

Do you get Patak’s curry paste over there? I can ship some to you if you need.

Fry off (dry heavy pan or use a little oil) an onion and the meat of your choice then add 2 tbs of the paste. Fry for a couple of minutes longer and then add 1 cup water. Simmer until meat is tender.

I like to add vinegar if I’m doing anything hot as it gives an amazing flavour.

Finally add a good handful of chopped corriander leaf (Cillantro) and scoff to your hearts content.

If you are bulking, throw in some sour cream too for the added calories right at the end of cooking.

Easy stuff.

Do you have access to herbs and spices? The Pataks stuff that I mention is just a lazy way of producing your own curry base paste. I can post up recipes for that if you can get the ingredients.

Not sure on that specific brand, Renton, but there are plenty of “curry pastes”. I’m not opposed to getting the curry powder and making my own shit all the way from scratch, so long as it’s delicious when I’m done.

I’m going to try what you just typed out on Sunday. I have both a red curry paste and a green curry paste. I literally just finished eating a recipe with the green curry but I’m still disappointed. I don’t know WHAT that old restaurant did but I need to mimic it. It’s like crack.

Just spicy enough to make your nose runny, but so good you just keep shoveling it in.

I’ll keep the search on.

thanks!

It’s all about the curry. Since this spice is a combination of spices there are a lot of variations.

[quote]msd0060 wrote:
Not sure on that specific brand, Renton, but there are plenty of “curry pastes”. I’m not opposed to getting the curry powder and making my own shit all the way from scratch, so long as it’s delicious when I’m done.

I’m going to try what you just typed out on Sunday. I have both a red curry paste and a green curry paste. I literally just finished eating a recipe with the green curry but I’m still disappointed. I don’t know WHAT that old restaurant did but I need to mimic it. It’s like crack.

Just spicy enough to make your nose runny, but so good you just keep shoveling it in.

I’ll keep the search on.

thanks![/quote]

Ahhh - red & green? Are you talking Thai rather than Indian? If yes then you need to include fish sauce (Nam Pla) and coconut, lemon grass too if there is none in the paste. Green will usually be hotter than red. Better tasing too IMO.

Same method as I outlined above. Use coconut instead of water though. BTW - Not coconut milk(the water inside a coconut) - you can get block coconut and melt it down in boiling water. Use that.

[edit] and NO vinegar!

If its thai I can help,
I love to cook thai I had a fried teach me,
she is thai.

There are several commercial thai curries
on the market

MAE PLOY is a decent brand .
Traditional thai comes in 5 or 6 ? types

red
green
panang
Yellow
matsaman
shushe

the green red, and panang are the hottest.
the others are more mild.

You might need a few things to make the thai foods taste really authentic

asside from the fish sauce- thanks renton.
limes.
sugar
small red shallots
and kaffir lime leaves… there are curry leaves too, these are a little different.

I dont really eat meat- but that does not mean I cant help
here is an easy one:

8 ounces (or what ever) of beef a lean steak
sliced into thin slices
1 large red pepper 1/2 slices
1 med sized onion 1/2 slices or 1/4 diced
string beans 1/2 cup or cut to same lenght trim ends.
or green peas 1/2 cup

Red curry
shallots
lime leaf
thai basil ( holy basil)
mint or cilantro (what you like)
coconut milk fresh is the best,
this is if you need to temper the heat.
you can skip it if you like

fish sauce
sugar or splenda
limes or fresh lime juice.
kaffir lime leaf
(chiffinade sliced into ribbons)
small thai red shallots 1 or 2 diced small.

You can make this with beef or squid
I use squid and pad prik king which is like
variant of red curry

I use a very high heat
Use peanut or veg oil Olive oil is great,
but might burn and be to strong tasting for the foods

on high heat
put in the shallots
put in a table spoon or two of the curry paste
add the onion after a minute or two.
add the beef
all the while stirring
3 to 5 mins
add the mint/cilantro
add the pepper

when the beef strips are done…
add the fish sauce and lime juice in equal parts… sugar to taste…
this part is tricky, less is more in the
begining
this is also where you add the lime leaf if you have, this what makes the dish.

once you add the liquids
add the string beans or peas.
they should steam out.
you can turn down the heat to low.
the veg should be very crisp that is why I use a high heat.

this is when you can add coconut milk , if you like canned has a ton of fat, the fresh from a coconut, not as much,
its very sweet as well. this will help temper the heat.

when the string beans are bright green,
turn off the heat and dig in.

beer goes with all thai curries.

If anyone wants more, just let me know…

If you want to make the curries.
I can tell you how its not hard but it takes a while…

you can make them at home and they taste amazing

kmc

Oops

I forgot most of the curries,
and a few other dishes you will want to use a mortar and pestle you can use a food processor to make the curry but it does not taset the same

its really about the small stuff that will change how everything tastes…

particularly the kafffir lime leaves.
there are a few other things.
galanga its like gingers mean cousin
sirachi hot sauce- it has the rooster on the bottle

thai- or holy basil or purple basil
much sharper than others.

kmc

Many countries have their own curries. Indian, Thai, Korean, Japanese etc…

Japanese is really good. It comes in bricks that look like hash. You add it to meat, veggies, and water and it’s like a stew. Thai is really good too.

If you want to make some awesome curry I highly recommend adding in some Major Grey’s Chutney.

Chutney can also be real good for taming lion, because some Indian food can be wickedly hot.

Nice work everybody! kmcnyc - You just decided what I’ll be eating for my tea.

Good to see that you get Mae Ploy in the US too. It’s rediculously cheap here in the UK - I use a lot of it.

Thanks for fleshing out my post too - I was tired when I typed it and totally forgot the essential lime leaves!

I’m more partial to Indian curries, and like skipping the rice in favor of lentils.

I hope this thread takes off!

I have several authentic indian curry books.

There are literally thousands of variations of curries, pretty much different for each family in india.

It’s best to make your own curries yourself and not buy them from the store. This way you can alter the spices and make them suite you better.

Here’s a traditional Keralan curry (BTW, its best to experiment with the quantities of ingredients when cooking curries. A lot of asian chefs cook very instinctively but this is after they have the experience to know basically how much of each spice to add. What is important here is that there is not too much water.

This is a pretty advanced one, but its the real deal.:


  • coconut oil, (you can substitute with peanut oil is you want) enough to lubricate the pan very well. I would say 8TBSP depending on the size of your pan.
  • mustard seed, 1 tsp
  • fenugreek seed, 1 tsp
  • 3TBSP curry leaves, dried
  • 2tsp ginger, pulped
  • 2tsp onion seed

Heat the oil until the pan is smoking. Add the ingredients and fry for 3 minutes.

  • chili powder, 1-2TBSP depending on how hot you like it and how hot the chili powder that you have is
  • 2TBSP turmeric powder
  • 3 green chilis, chopped, 2 de-seeded and 1 with seeds intact
  • salt, to taste
  • ½cup tomato pulp. Its best to use the very ripe and soft tomatoes as uppused to firm and fresh ones. Chop them up. You can use tinned tomato pulp if you want.

Fry these for several minutes, until the pan is dry.

  • 3 cups water
  • tamarind, to taste. You can use the one that comes in a block, or tinned or whatever you like. Just make sure it dissolves completely.

Cook for at least 20 minutes (on a medium heat) or until the curry has reduced and the flavours have melded. To be honest, I don’t like prescribing set time, like 15 minutes or 20 minutes. It’s better to take it offf the heat when the flavours have matured. In this case, when the tomatoes are cooked properly and the sauce doesn’t taste raw.

I will add more recipies, including ones that are faster and simpler to make.

Curries (mostly Thai or SE Asian, but not all) make up almost half of my diet. The best advice I can give on cooking them in general is to experiment repeatedly. Try a few recipes from here, a few from cookbooks, etc. Then try playing with just the ingredients on the back of your favorite paste or mix since they’re generally less complicated and will let you see what the little things add. Eventually you will get a feel for what each ingredient does to the end product.

The other general piece of advice is to try to find the real ingredients. Fresh galinga and birds eye chilies may take more work to find than their common North American substitutes, but the difference in taste is quite substantial. Also, like Renton mentioned, don’t shy away from the fish sauce. For the love of all that is good and decent in the world don’t spill it either.