T Nation

Who Do Kids Belong To?

This is the type of thing MSNBC is now pushing. I’m sort of speachless.

opin about it

I’m sure there are other outlets going on about the statement.

I get the whole “it takes a village” thing, but the way she puts it here… I’m not comfortable with.

[quote]countingbeans wrote:

This is the type of thing MSNBC is now pushing. I’m sort of speachless.

opin about it

I’m sure there are other outlets going on about the statement.

I get the whole “it takes a village” thing, but the way she puts it here… I’m not comfortable with. [/quote]

First, your children are not your own. Then, your money is not your own, but the collectives investment.

[quote]countingbeans wrote:
I get the whole “it takes a village” thing, but the way she puts it here… I’m not comfortable with. [/quote]

It doesn’t take a village. That is just a mindless thing that people who do not know how to raise children say.

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:

[quote]countingbeans wrote:
I get the whole “it takes a village” thing, but the way she puts it here… I’m not comfortable with. [/quote]

It doesn’t take a village. That is just a mindless thing that people who do not know how to raise children say.[/quote]

Iget what you are saying, and tend to agree on the way you are saying it.

But when I think of that phrase I think of the effects my peers and interactions with adults other than my family shaped my view of the social group in which I lived.

I guess I take it to mean that people will see the world through different lenses if they are raised in NYC v rural montana…

[quote]countingbeans wrote:

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:

[quote]countingbeans wrote:
I get the whole “it takes a village” thing, but the way she puts it here… I’m not comfortable with. [/quote]

It doesn’t take a village. That is just a mindless thing that people who do not know how to raise children say.[/quote]

Iget what you are saying, and tend to agree on the way you are saying it.

But when I think of that phrase I think of the effects my peers and interactions with adults other than my family shaped my view of the social group in which I lived.

I guess I take it to mean that people will see the world through different lenses if they are raised in NYC v rural montana…[/quote]

“The village” is an incidental element in a voluntary society but it is not a necessary requirement to raise children.

There are aspects of “the village” that we probably do not want our children involved in.

Though, I will agree the idea of a village raising children does appeal to the masses of quasi-intellectual liberal types.

[quote]countingbeans wrote:

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:

[quote]countingbeans wrote:
I get the whole “it takes a village” thing, but the way she puts it here… I’m not comfortable with. [/quote]

It doesn’t take a village. That is just a mindless thing that people who do not know how to raise children say.[/quote]

Iget what you are saying, and tend to agree on the way you are saying it.

But when I think of that phrase I think of the effects my peers and interactions with adults other than my family shaped my view of the social group in which I lived.

I guess I take it to mean that people will see the world through different lenses if they are raised in NYC v rural montana…[/quote]

It only really makes sense if you live in an actual village, which we (Americans) don’t. I don’t have kids so take this for what it’s worth, but I feel the exact opposite. If parents spent more time teaching their kids vs. the community teaching than our youth would be better off. I don’t like this group think mentality.

What does she mean with “we never have invested…”?

From the money invested for one kid in the US, whole classes are taught in India or China and they are wiping the floor with American kids.

Of course, if she meant that parents need to parent the fuck up and invest some time and interest in their childrens homework, and try to instill a solid work ethic or something, yeahhhh, kind off?

I’m not being clear on my interpritation of “it takes a village”

Part of growing up is learning your surroundings and how to interact within that environment. To me, the “it takes a village” comes down to a) no matter how much you try and prevent it, other people in their envronment affect the way a child grows and develops b) parents cannot anticipate the real world to the degree needed where other people’s influence doesn’t matter anymore.

It is like football. You can practice plays and situations until you are blue in the face, but you can’t replicate everything in practice. Game experience at Sunday speed is going to be teacher as well.

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:

“The village” is an incidental element in a voluntary society but it is not a necessary requirement to raise children.

There are aspects of “the village” that we probably do not want our children involved in.
[/quote]

Obvi.

I would argue it is necessary to expose your child to the village if you want them to be able to naviagte it once they are independent.

As to the second part, I agree, and they make great teaching aids. I drive my son by one or two meth adicts walking home with their single can of soup and he gets it pretty quick.

I’m “speachless”…that you misspelled the word ‘speechless’.

LOL j/k…The whole ‘it takes a village’ thing she is saying doesn’t bother me,
in this day and age when kids are abused, it’s a GOOD thing there are communities
to see to it we all look out for each other, because the FIRST thing abusers need
to do their deeds is ISOLATION, and with “community” it’s impossible to get away
with doing bad deeds.
Not EVERY parent or step parent abuses kids of course, but “communities” are important,
especially when now more than ever in American society neighbors don’t even know
each other any more.

I am OK with the village concept. I grew up in a little coastal village. I think we had 8600 people in the village proper and more counting the surrounding al-Mawasi Bedouin. All us kids ran around in packs on bikes until the Intifada. I had great non-parental influences, from the baker, from the bedouins that ran the hot houses, to the ex-pat Californian (a Mexican Jew, funy enough – we called him Juan Epstein) who taught me to surf.

The problem I have, however, is liberals believe they have the right to pick the village and design what is learned in said “village,” which is the real agenda here — destroy and replace parental influence over which they may disagree.

The guise is the objectively-bad meth-addicted parents, who do need to be replaced.

The goal, however, is to indoctrinate children.

[quote]Jewbacca wrote:
I am OK with the village concept. I grew up in a little coastal village. I think we had 8600 people in the village proper and more counting the surrounding al-Mawasi Bedouin. All us kids ran around in packs on bikes until the Intifada. I had great non-parental influences, from the baker, from the bedouins that ran the hot houses, to the ex-pat Californian (a Mexican Jew, funy enough – we called him Juan Epstein) who taught me to surf.

The problem I have, however, is liberals believe they have the right to pick the village and design what is learned in said “village,” which is the real agenda here — destroy and replace parental influence over which they may disagree.

The guise is the objectively-bad meth-addicted parents, who do need to be replaced.

The goal, however, is to indoctrinate children.[/quote]

Jewbacca for President, but since you are not born here, then Jewbacca for Senate.

^Jewbacca hit the nail right on the head.

The village idea is a good one. It’s just not reality in the U.S. When I was young I lived in a more “village” oriented community. It was town homes and all the kids hung out together, road bikes, etc…The parents, though, went to work all day. No bakery, no town stores, etc…I couldn’t tell you what anyone did for a living. Fast forward to my teenage years and we lived in a single family home. I knew a handful of neighborhood kids and we hung out, but again no idea what the parents did. Now my wife and I don’t even know the neighbors names. We just keep to ourselves and they keep to their selves.

There is no village mentality here.

[quote]dmaddox wrote:
Jewbacca for President, but since you are not born here, then Jewbacca for Senate.[/quote]

Oddly enough, the RJC (Republican Jewish Coalition) asked me to run for an open house seat in NY. They were convinced I’d win – heavily Orthodox area, and I would not need to raise money. Wanted me to take classes to de-Israeli my English accent and make it more local.

Then I got a call from a Republican Congressman from the target state saying I was on everyone’s short list. Said I’d tear it up on Sunday morning news shows because I am refreshingly blunt.

Mrs. Jewbacca threated surgical removal of male parts.

[quote]Jewbacca wrote:

[quote]dmaddox wrote:
Jewbacca for President, but since you are not born here, then Jewbacca for Senate.[/quote]

Oddly enough, the RJC (Republican Jewish Coalition) asked me to run for an open house seat in NY. They were convinced I’d win – heavily Orthodox area, and I would not need to raise money. Wanted me to take classes to de-Israeli my English accent and make it more local.

Then I got a call from a Republican Congressman from the target state saying I was on everyone’s short list. Said I’d tear it up on Sunday morning news shows because I am refreshingly blunt.

Mrs. Jewbacca threated surgical removal of male parts.[/quote]

So Mrs. Jewbacca does not like partaking of said parts? :slight_smile: I would call her bluff and go for it.

[quote]countingbeans wrote:
I’m not being clear on my interpritation of “it takes a village”

Part of growing up is learning your surroundings and how to interact within that environment. To me, the “it takes a village” comes down to a) no matter how much you try and prevent it, other people in their envronment affect the way a child grows and develops b) parents cannot anticipate the real world to the degree needed where other people’s influence doesn’t matter anymore.

It is like football. You can practice plays and situations until you are blue in the face, but you can’t replicate everything in practice. Game experience at Sunday speed is going to be teacher as well.

[/quote]

My old college coach used to say, “It’s not about practice makes perfect. It’s about perfect practice makes perfect.”

[quote]Jewbacca wrote:

The goal, however, is to indoctrinate children.[/quote]

“Liberals do X” and “conservatives do Y” are pretty much never true sentences.

And when the Texas Board of Education strikes Thomas Jefferson from a list of revolutionary 18th and 19th century figures because he coined the term “separation of church and state,” it’s not indoctrination, right?

^ For the record, I agree with the condemnation that the video has met with.

That is such a creepy and invasive way of pitching the idea that we should dedicate more funding to public education. “We should break through our private idea that kids belong to their families” is fucking ghoulish and makes my skin crawl.