T Nation

Where to Buy Mini-Weights?

I’m looking to buy mini-weights for dumbbells as I can’t hit the next 5 lbs but could do 2.5 lbs…

Where can I buy mini-weights?

Thanks,
Spadek

I read somewhere that you can grab ‘washers’ at a hardware store, and use them for smaller incremental jumps in weight.

S

at the pussy store.

i think newyork barbell sells really light weight increments. but wth you gonna do with .5 pounds? use some light chains from the hardware store or something

[quote]LiveFromThe781 wrote:
at the pussy store.

i think newyork barbell sells really light weight increments. but wth you gonna do with .5 pounds? use some light chains from the hardware store or something[/quote]

I’m talking about 1.15 lbs ones.

Hey, every incremental improvement means progress.

I’ve used wrist weights before to add resistance to dumbell excercises. You might try getting a pound of chain with a clip or hook and looping/draping it around the handle to one side or the other of your hand, and then people would start calling you spawn. Anything would work really, just weight it and stick it on somehow.

Not sure what kind of weights you are looking for as far a something you can use with barbells or dumbbells, but check out PlateMates and then APT also sells a set of fractional plates.

[quote]SpadeK wrote:
LiveFromThe781 wrote:
at the pussy store.

i think newyork barbell sells really light weight increments. but wth you gonna do with .5 pounds? use some light chains from the hardware store or something

I’m talking about 1.15 lbs ones.

Hey, every incremental improvement means progress.[/quote]

I would think increments that small would serve an advanced bodybuilder who knows he won’t see much overall progress rather than some newbie who SHOULD be growing much faster.

I see no reason at all for someone to need weight increases that tiny. The same or BETTER effect can be had from using your “heaviest last set weight” until you can get it up 6-8 times. By that time, you should be able to handle the next weight up by 5lbs for at least a few reps and then you work at that until you can get it the same.

If you become one of these people who jumps for joy at ANY improvement, you sure as hell won’t make much overall.

These are not the types of lifters who shock anyone years later with the amazing amount of muscle mass they’ve built. These are the ones who may gain 10lbs in 5 years and who actually think that is a great accomplishment.

[quote]Professor X wrote:
SpadeK wrote:
LiveFromThe781 wrote:
at the pussy store.

i think newyork barbell sells really light weight increments. but wth you gonna do with .5 pounds? use some light chains from the hardware store or something

I’m talking about 1.15 lbs ones.

Hey, every incremental improvement means progress.

I would think increments that small would serve an advanced bodybuilder who knows he won’t see much overall progress rather than some newbie who SHOULD be growing much faster.

I see no reason at all for someone to need weight increases that tiny. The same or BETTER effect can be had from using your “heaviest last set weight” until you can get it up 6-8 times. By that time, you should be able to handle the next weight up by 5lbs for at least a few reps and then you work at that until you can get it the same.

If you become one of these people who jumps for joy at ANY improvement, you sure as hell won’t make much overall.

These are not the types of lifters who shock anyone years later with the amazing amount of muscle mass they’ve built. These are the ones who may gain 10lbs in 5 years and who actually think that is a great accomplishment.[/quote]

That’s what I think.

I refuse to accept anything less than a 15 lb increase on any of my lifts every time we test during football.

[quote]ukrainian wrote:
Professor X wrote:
SpadeK wrote:
LiveFromThe781 wrote:
at the pussy store.

i think newyork barbell sells really light weight increments. but wth you gonna do with .5 pounds? use some light chains from the hardware store or something

I’m talking about 1.15 lbs ones.

Hey, every incremental improvement means progress.

I would think increments that small would serve an advanced bodybuilder who knows he won’t see much overall progress rather than some newbie who SHOULD be growing much faster.

I see no reason at all for someone to need weight increases that tiny. The same or BETTER effect can be had from using your “heaviest last set weight” until you can get it up 6-8 times. By that time, you should be able to handle the next weight up by 5lbs for at least a few reps and then you work at that until you can get it the same.

If you become one of these people who jumps for joy at ANY improvement, you sure as hell won’t make much overall.

These are not the types of lifters who shock anyone years later with the amazing amount of muscle mass they’ve built. These are the ones who may gain 10lbs in 5 years and who actually think that is a great accomplishment.

That’s what I think.

I refuse to accept anything less than a 15 lb increase on any of my lifts every time we test during football. [/quote]

I’m using 75 lb dumbbells for 10x3s where 80 lbs I only get 2 reps - I would get to 80 lbs quicker with 77.5 lbs.

[quote]SpadeK wrote:
ukrainian wrote:
Professor X wrote:
SpadeK wrote:
LiveFromThe781 wrote:
at the pussy store.

i think newyork barbell sells really light weight increments. but wth you gonna do with .5 pounds? use some light chains from the hardware store or something

I’m talking about 1.15 lbs ones.

Hey, every incremental improvement means progress.

I would think increments that small would serve an advanced bodybuilder who knows he won’t see much overall progress rather than some newbie who SHOULD be growing much faster.

I see no reason at all for someone to need weight increases that tiny. The same or BETTER effect can be had from using your “heaviest last set weight” until you can get it up 6-8 times. By that time, you should be able to handle the next weight up by 5lbs for at least a few reps and then you work at that until you can get it the same.

If you become one of these people who jumps for joy at ANY improvement, you sure as hell won’t make much overall.

These are not the types of lifters who shock anyone years later with the amazing amount of muscle mass they’ve built. These are the ones who may gain 10lbs in 5 years and who actually think that is a great accomplishment.

That’s what I think.

I refuse to accept anything less than a 15 lb increase on any of my lifts every time we test during football.

I’m using 75 lb dumbbells for 10x3s where 80 lbs I only get 2 reps - I would get to 80 lbs quicker with 77.5 lbs.

[/quote]

10 sets of 3 reps? Is this correct? Why are your reps so low and, since they are, why would you worry about getting ONE LESS REP by going up 5lbs?

[quote]Professor X wrote:
SpadeK wrote:
ukrainian wrote:
Professor X wrote:
SpadeK wrote:
LiveFromThe781 wrote:
at the pussy store.

i think newyork barbell sells really light weight increments. but wth you gonna do with .5 pounds? use some light chains from the hardware store or something

I’m talking about 1.15 lbs ones.

Hey, every incremental improvement means progress.

I would think increments that small would serve an advanced bodybuilder who knows he won’t see much overall progress rather than some newbie who SHOULD be growing much faster.

I see no reason at all for someone to need weight increases that tiny. The same or BETTER effect can be had from using your “heaviest last set weight” until you can get it up 6-8 times. By that time, you should be able to handle the next weight up by 5lbs for at least a few reps and then you work at that until you can get it the same.

If you become one of these people who jumps for joy at ANY improvement, you sure as hell won’t make much overall.

These are not the types of lifters who shock anyone years later with the amazing amount of muscle mass they’ve built. These are the ones who may gain 10lbs in 5 years and who actually think that is a great accomplishment.

That’s what I think.

I refuse to accept anything less than a 15 lb increase on any of my lifts every time we test during football.

I’m using 75 lb dumbbells for 10x3s where 80 lbs I only get 2 reps - I would get to 80 lbs quicker with 77.5 lbs.

10 sets of 3 reps? Is this correct? Why are your reps so low and, since they are, why would you worry about getting ONE LESS REP by going up 5lbs?[/quote]

That’s a pretty common set/rep scheme in Waterbury routines. I’ve trained that way in the past, sometimes using a Waterbury routine, sometimes using a routine of my own design. It’s worked well for me, but I’ve never had to worry about small weight increases like the OP is talking about though. 5-10 lb increases have always been fine.

I get my mini-wheats at Albertsons.

Preferably frosted.

[quote]mr popular wrote:
I get my mini-wheats at Albertsons.

Preferably frosted.[/quote]

They come unfrosted?

Yeah my girlfriend eats them that way, it’s revolting.

[quote]AngryVader wrote:
Professor X wrote:
SpadeK wrote:
ukrainian wrote:
Professor X wrote:
SpadeK wrote:
LiveFromThe781 wrote:
at the pussy store.

i think newyork barbell sells really light weight increments. but wth you gonna do with .5 pounds? use some light chains from the hardware store or something

I’m talking about 1.15 lbs ones.

Hey, every incremental improvement means progress.

I would think increments that small would serve an advanced bodybuilder who knows he won’t see much overall progress rather than some newbie who SHOULD be growing much faster.

I see no reason at all for someone to need weight increases that tiny. The same or BETTER effect can be had from using your “heaviest last set weight” until you can get it up 6-8 times. By that time, you should be able to handle the next weight up by 5lbs for at least a few reps and then you work at that until you can get it the same.

If you become one of these people who jumps for joy at ANY improvement, you sure as hell won’t make much overall.

These are not the types of lifters who shock anyone years later with the amazing amount of muscle mass they’ve built. These are the ones who may gain 10lbs in 5 years and who actually think that is a great accomplishment.

That’s what I think.

I refuse to accept anything less than a 15 lb increase on any of my lifts every time we test during football.

I’m using 75 lb dumbbells for 10x3s where 80 lbs I only get 2 reps - I would get to 80 lbs quicker with 77.5 lbs.

10 sets of 3 reps? Is this correct? Why are your reps so low and, since they are, why would you worry about getting ONE LESS REP by going up 5lbs?

That’s a pretty common set/rep scheme in Waterbury routines. I’ve trained that way in the past, sometimes using a Waterbury routine, sometimes using a routine of my own design. It’s worked well for me, but I’ve never had to worry about small weight increases like the OP is talking about though. 5-10 lb increases have always been fine.[/quote]

I think that may be fine if you are NOT A BEGINNER. I don’t see most people who are fretting because they got one less rep actually making much long term progress.

Someone with more drive wouldn’t be looking for washers in that scenario. They would work at it until they could get that 5+lbs just as easily as they did the previous weight.

The goal is not to make the least amount of progress possible while trying to make yourself feel good simply because you added fishing lures to your dumbbells.

This guy is more concerned with sticking to a pre-set program than he is actually making more progress.

My recommendation to someone like that is to drop the weight and increase the reps to a more standard 8-10. Some people need to learn how to simply build muscle mass before they worry about which guru to follow.

[quote]Professor X wrote:
AngryVader wrote:
Professor X wrote:
SpadeK wrote:
ukrainian wrote:
Professor X wrote:
SpadeK wrote:
LiveFromThe781 wrote:
at the pussy store.

i think newyork barbell sells really light weight increments. but wth you gonna do with .5 pounds? use some light chains from the hardware store or something

I’m talking about 1.15 lbs ones.

Hey, every incremental improvement means progress.

I would think increments that small would serve an advanced bodybuilder who knows he won’t see much overall progress rather than some newbie who SHOULD be growing much faster.

I see no reason at all for someone to need weight increases that tiny. The same or BETTER effect can be had from using your “heaviest last set weight” until you can get it up 6-8 times. By that time, you should be able to handle the next weight up by 5lbs for at least a few reps and then you work at that until you can get it the same.

If you become one of these people who jumps for joy at ANY improvement, you sure as hell won’t make much overall.

These are not the types of lifters who shock anyone years later with the amazing amount of muscle mass they’ve built. These are the ones who may gain 10lbs in 5 years and who actually think that is a great accomplishment.

That’s what I think.

I refuse to accept anything less than a 15 lb increase on any of my lifts every time we test during football.

I’m using 75 lb dumbbells for 10x3s where 80 lbs I only get 2 reps - I would get to 80 lbs quicker with 77.5 lbs.

10 sets of 3 reps? Is this correct? Why are your reps so low and, since they are, why would you worry about getting ONE LESS REP by going up 5lbs?

That’s a pretty common set/rep scheme in Waterbury routines. I’ve trained that way in the past, sometimes using a Waterbury routine, sometimes using a routine of my own design. It’s worked well for me, but I’ve never had to worry about small weight increases like the OP is talking about though. 5-10 lb increases have always been fine.

I think that may be fine if you are NOT A BEGINNER. I don’t see most people who are fretting because they got one less rep actually making much long term progress.

Someone with more drive wouldn’t be looking for washers in that scenario. They would work at it until they could get that 5+lbs just as easily as they did the previous weight.

The goal is not to make the least amount of progress possible while trying to make yourself feel good simply because you added fishing lures to your dumbbells.

This guy is more concerned with sticking to a pre-set program than he is actually making more progress.

My recommendation to someone like that is to drop the weight and increase the reps to a more standard 8-10. Some people need to learn how to simply build muscle mass before they worry about which guru to follow.[/quote]

I agree with you there. Training like that isn’t something I started out with. It was something I moved towards as I found through my training that I responded better to lower reps for certain body parts and exercises. In fact, I recall training this way before I ever read about it here.

I don’t recommend a beginner train this way. You need a certain level of strength and experience before you can safely train this way and get anything out of it. It’s not a good way to train if you’re still learning proper form either. Beginners should stick to the standard rep ranges.

There are times where when I increase my typical 5-10 lbs pounds and my reps do drop for some of my sets. That just means I work until I can complete all sets/reps with that weight and then I increase again.