T Nation

Where Does DOMS Play a Part?

#21

Bet you get some lovely doms haha

#22

Absurd

  1. Implementation of a new training program and/or exercise needs to be eased into. This minimizes soreness.

  2. After the first or second training session with the new program and/or exercise NO soreness should occur due to the “Repeated Bout Effect.”

  3. Chronic pain after multiple training session is a “Red Flag” that you are doing something wrong.

Kenny Croxdale

6 Likes
#23

Excellent Point

There are a multitude of Personal Training Organizations that basically are worthless.

Reputable gym only hire individuals with one of these…

Personal Training Organizations

  1. Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (National Strength and Conditioning Association.

As you noted, you need a college degree just to sit for the test.

Most Strength Coaches have a CSCS; geared more toward sports training.

  1. American College of Sport Medicine, ACSM.

This certification rank along side the CSCS.

The ASCM’s focus is more into health.

  1. American Council on Exercise., ACE

  2. National Academy of Sport Medicine, NASM

  3. International Sports Society Association

  4. Athletics and Fitness Association of America, AFAA

Kenny Croxdale

5 Likes
#24

@KennyCrox :+1: Love your posts on this thread!!

1 Like
#25

Here in Australia it’s even worse. There’s one qualification you need to get liability insurance (which includes a lot about running a business as opposed to training people), and then continuing education credits which are any BS the course runner pays to get accredited.

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#26

And it really shows. I asked my gym owner/trainer the other day if he could purchase a trap bar. He just stared at me like I was on drugs (I wasn’t). I than said hex bar… Nothing… He had to google it just to see what I mean. I’m not sure he had ever seen one in his life.

I would NEVER get a gym pt to strength train me. They are only good for fat loss motivation and telling you how to use a pec deck.

3 Likes
#27

I am puzzled at how you came to this conclusion.

One of the most reputable organization in Australia is the…

Australian Strength and Conditioning Association
https://www.strengthandconditioning.org/

This organization is one of the most knowledgeable, respected organization in the global community.

It is composed and run by individuals that reside in the Exercise Science Community.

It is the equivalent to the America’s National Strength and Conditioning Association.
The NSCA are one of the leaders in the field of Exercise Science.

Their Journal of Australian Strength and Conditioning (JASC) provideS some of the best research in the global community.

Kenny Croxdale

#28

As well as it should be…

#29

I would rather exercise in a way that doesn’t give me doms.

1 Like
#30

@KennyCrox that’s the first I’ve heard of it. All you actually need to earn money as a PT is a certificate IV in fitness, a current first aid certificate and that’s it. You get your cert IV in as little as six months.

#31

am I the only person who just always gets DOMS? Every legs or chest workout I’ve ever done has given me DOMS. Back is 50/50.

It’s just part of my every day life that one third of my muscles are always a little sore. Don’t even really notice it anymore.

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#32

If I only squat once a week than my quads will be sore after leg day. If I just look at my triceps the wrong way they will give me DOMS. Chest is hit n miss with me. My biceps and forearms are about the only muscles that usually don’t get soreness after working them.

1 Like
#33

Bro myth states ,that if you jerk it often you dont get arm doms anymore haha.

#34

MarkKO,

Yes, the Australian Strength and Conditioning Association has some of the best Exercise Physiologist in the field.

Many of the members of the Australian Strength and Conditioning Association collaborate with those of in America’s National Strength and Conditioning Association, publishing research articles.

Drs. Daniel Baker and Robert Newton from Australian are two of the best. Their research has been published in America’s National Strength and Conditioning Research Journal on topics such as: Complex Training, Explosive-Reactive Ballistic Training, Cluster Sets, etc.

I have implemented their research data into my training programs. When they “Talk”, I listen.

Here is information on…

Dr Daniel Baker
http://www.exrx.net/People/Consultants/DBaker.html

Dr Robert Netwon
https://www.ecu.edu.au/schools/medical-and-health-sciences/our-research/centre-for-exercise-and-sports-science-research-cessr/researchers-and-staff/profiles/research-team/professor-rob-newton

Australian, Warren Frost’s research on Eccentric Strength Training and it application is a brilliant piece of work: “Eccentric movements: Description, Definition and Designing Programmes”.

Personal Training Certifications

Here in America their are Personal Training Certifications that you can get online in a day by taking and online test.

That means you look up answer in a book or is allows you to have someone else take the test for you.

You can obtain a Cross Fit Certification by taking a two day Weekend Course.

The majority of “Personal Trainers” who obtain Certification from online test and weekend course have a very limited amount of knowledge/experience; which is NOT good.

With that said, you should interview a Personal Trainer before hiring one.

You are the employer, the Personal Trainer is the employee. You want to hire the best person for the job.

Criteria

  1. Personal Training Certification: Find out if they are Certified with a reputable Personal Training Organization or a Degree in Exercise Physiology.

This ensure that they have some degree of knowledge in the science of training.

However, just because they’ve read the book doesn’t mean they have “Combat Experience” in the trenches.

  1. Background Experience: Find out if they have previous experience in the area of training that you want help in.

Essentially, you want someone who’s has practical real world experience. Individual such as bulldog9899 have invaluable "Combat Experience (metaphorically speaking).

With that let me add…

Great Athletes Make Poor Coaches

Great athletes are genetically gifted. The majority are able just “Do it” intuitively without thinking. They don’t break things down, analyze them.

Thus, they traditionally make poor coaches.

Ironically, many individual believe individual lift the most must know the most; the opposite is usually true.

Good Overachiever Athletes Make Great Coaches

Traditionally, athletes that rank in the B + to A- category make the greatest coaches.

They have some good genetics. However, they excel because they “Study The Game”; breaking it down into pieces.

They find out what works. They try to find out why it works, if possible. Science often can’t determine exactly why.

They know the “Rules” of training and most importantly the exceptions, when to you can and should “Break The Rules”.

Kenny Croxdale

4 Likes
#35

That needs to be sent out to anyone who’s starting out and is thinking of hiring a PT. Damn good points.

1 Like
#36

I used to have a sore chest literally after every chest workout. When I increased the frequency of my bench presses it almost vanished. Frequency really helps

1 Like