T Nation

Where are the Pro-Protein Lobbyists?


#1

Most of us have seen the consequences of the pro-carb lobbyists such as the corn lobbyists but where the h*ll are the protein guys?

Have the egg, meat and other high protein guys banded together yet to try and influence national opinion? If so, why aren't they more successful?

There was some recent success over in the UK for the egg companies when a scientific publication showing egg consumption was unrelated to heart disease caught the eye of the media.

But is it really that hard for the companies producing high protein food to be heard? Is it that they don't have the budget? I wouldn't mind making a contribution to the cause. Is there a pro-protein lobby website?


#2

at least in the states they don’t need to.

everyone knows fast food is terrible for you, yet people still eat it day in and day out.

a diet dominated by saturated fat is terrible for you, yet people still do it.

as hard as the medical establishment rails on eggs, steak, and bacon, people still consume it in large amounts, even poorly prepared.

ive never seen any numbers, but i really doubt the HFCS industry took much of a hit even with companies moving away from HFCS, its still in the other 98% of processed foods.

people say they don’t like it but still vote for it with their wallets.


#3

Beef, it’s what’s for dinner.


#4

[quote]PB-Crawl wrote:
at least in the states they don’t need to.

everyone knows fast food is terrible for you, yet people still eat it day in and day out.

a diet dominated by saturated fat is terrible for you, yet people still do it.

as hard as the medical establishment rails on eggs, steak, and bacon, people still consume it in large amounts, even poorly prepared.[/quote]

I might have misread your post but are you against eggs, steak and bacon? Also depending on what your definition of dominated is I might take issue with saturated fats being terrible for you. So long as the fats are split in a 1:1:1 ratio between saturated, polyunsaturated and monounsaturated its all good.


Back on topic:

Medical professionals will argue all day about what is and isn’t good for you.

Companies will still try advertise that their products are best for people regardless of what the medical establishment says. So where are the high-protein companies with this?

Would the FCC block ads saying that high protein foods are good for you? I mean the got milk campaign was huge and milk is pretty high in protein.

Also what about the more obviously healthy foods like green vegetables and fish? No doctor will say that green vegetables and fish are bad for you. Why aren’t the companies getting together to do some ads?

Some good ads with recipes shown on it might help sales. I know we see ads from companies like Bird’s Eye for fish but usually those Bird’s Eye foods are fairly processed. I’m talking about farmers and producers getting together with some of the supermarkets to advertise fresh meats and vegetables as the healthiest choice for people.


#5

Other considerations are distribution and shelf life, etc. Highly processed foods usually have long(er) shelf lives than their organic, natural or un-processed counterparts. Wholesalers and retailers are theoretically taking a greater risk if stocking perishables, when they can indefinitely leave a box of instant pancake dust on the shelf until it’s sold.

So the “best” products are arguably often sold to the high end restaurant and food supply wholesalers, who are charging their customers a premium for the entire dining experience, blah, blah, blah. And obviously we as individual consumers get raped on the prices if these items are available in our chain supermarkets.

If people were willing to shop from markets that were supported by local farms and ranches, the staples of their diet could come from much healthier origins. But instead, many of us value the luxury more, of walking into our city’s supermarket chain and finding a wide selection of ‘food products’ from wide and diverse geographic regions.

When I lived in an apartment in the heart of suburban Miami, I still managed to keep an herb and vegetable “garden” on my terrace. Fresh basil, mint, peppers, tomatos, etc…were not that hard to maintain.