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When is It Safe to Sprint?

Hey guys,

Assuming somebody was active in high school and in a recent past, but now leads a severe Sedentary lifestyle. Espescially for the last 6 months (due depression) his activity level was less than 1hr per week. Now he has (abdominal) obesity. Just riding his bike to the gym makes him sweat and gasp for air.

Is it safe for me to start sprinting? My blood level is 120/70 I’m 21 yo. Not sure if there is anything else I should get checked.

Maybe start with some easy jogging first. More so to get your body used to the impact and actually running.

I suggest the “couch to 5m program”.

Uncle Bird.

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How much do you push the bike-ride? Is it at a nice, fast pace? Or is it sweet and slow?
And what is abdominal obesity? Obesity is obesity. Do you mean that you have some fat on your mid-section, and you’re saying that’s obese?

Actually, it doesn’t really matter either way. Trying to sprint when you haven’t done it in the past month, or couple of weeks for that matter, will make you hate yourself at that given moment. If you push it too hard then you’ll be dead-tired and sore for the next couple of days.

Thankfully, you’re 21 and you can trust in your body to be able to heal up rather quickly from most things. So, ya, you can probably sprint. Just keep the sprint sessions nice and short in time and for short distances.

[quote]Kardash wrote:
Is it safe for me to start sprinting?[/quote]

Almost surely, yes.

You know, before the internet, there was really no way for people to check-in BEFORE picking themselves up and just getting after it already. And this was prob a good thing.

Safe? Probably.

Only thing is though, if merely riding your bike to the gym (assuming you are not really gunning it) gets you ‘gasping for air’ sprinting is probably going to rape you within just a few sprint intervals. So, yeah, you could sprint though, I reckon you’d probably be better off starting with something a lil easier for the first month or two.

Like Maybe, use your bicycle for high intensity work + run/jog miles/half miles etc to help get your body used to rigours of running.

[quote]chillain wrote:

[quote]Kardash wrote:
Is it safe for me to start sprinting?[/quote]

Almost surely, yes.

You know, before the internet, there was really no way for people to check-in BEFORE picking themselves up and just getting after it already. And this was prob a good thing.
[/quote]

Teared hamstrings are NOT a good thing.

[quote]niksamaras wrote:

[quote]chillain wrote:

[quote]Kardash wrote:
Is it safe for me to start sprinting?[/quote]

Almost surely, yes.

You know, before the internet, there was really no way for people to check-in BEFORE picking themselves up and just getting after it already. And this was prob a good thing.
[/quote]

Teared hamstrings are NOT a good thing.[/quote]

More internet melodrama. I don’t think its coincidence that hamstring pulls/tears by non-competitive amateurs is now so worrisome/commonplace.

Anyway, the advice from others is good. Ease back into the groove of running and pick up speed with each workout. But also, just get started already.

[quote]Kardash wrote:
Hey guys,

Assuming somebody was active in high school and in a recent past, but now leads a severe Sedentary lifestyle. Espescially for the last 6 months (due depression) his activity level was less than 1hr per week. Now he has (abdominal) obesity. Just riding his bike to the gym makes him sweat and gasp for air.

Is it safe for me to start sprinting? My blood level is 120/70 I’m 21 yo. Not sure if there is anything else I should get checked.

[/quote]

If you decide to do some sprints,do uphill sprints until you get in better shape.Theres much lower chance of hamstring pull sprinting uphill.

[quote]chillain wrote:

[quote]niksamaras wrote:

[quote]chillain wrote:

[quote]Kardash wrote:
Is it safe for me to start sprinting?[/quote]

Almost surely, yes.

You know, before the internet, there was really no way for people to check-in BEFORE picking themselves up and just getting after it already. And this was prob a good thing.
[/quote]

Teared hamstrings are NOT a good thing.[/quote]

More internet melodrama. I don’t think its coincidence that hamstring pulls/tears by non-competitive amateurs is now so worrisome/commonplace.

Anyway, the advice from others is good. Ease back into the groove of running and pick up speed with each workout. But also, just get started already.
[/quote]

I have seen way too may tears on people coming to our track and field team fresh new, sprinting at 100% after a week, and pulling their hamstrings within the next month. Especially eople who are just good sprinters by nature.

[quote]niksamaras wrote:

[quote]chillain wrote:

[quote]niksamaras wrote:

[quote]chillain wrote:

[quote]Kardash wrote:
Is it safe for me to start sprinting?[/quote]

Almost surely, yes.

You know, before the internet, there was really no way for people to check-in BEFORE picking themselves up and just getting after it already. And this was prob a good thing.
[/quote]

Teared hamstrings are NOT a good thing.[/quote]

More internet melodrama. I don’t think its coincidence that hamstring pulls/tears by non-competitive amateurs is now so worrisome/commonplace.

Anyway, the advice from others is good. Ease back into the groove of running and pick up speed with each workout. But also, just get started already.
[/quote]

I have seen way too may tears on people coming to our track and field team fresh new, sprinting at 100% after a week, and pulling their hamstrings within the next month. Especially eople who are just good sprinters by nature.[/quote]

Did it mid-November last year.2nd degree hamstring-tear.Some residual soreness from squat workout,cold weather,needed more warm up.Just as I hit top speed in my fifth sprint- craaack!! Reduced me in one second to limping man bundled in pain.Took me 2 weeks to ne able to just jogg.

[quote]niksamaras wrote:

[quote]chillain wrote:

[quote]niksamaras wrote:

[quote]chillain wrote:

[quote]Kardash wrote:
Is it safe for me to start sprinting?[/quote]

Almost surely, yes.

You know, before the internet, there was really no way for people to check-in BEFORE picking themselves up and just getting after it already. And this was prob a good thing.
[/quote]

Teared hamstrings are NOT a good thing.[/quote]

More internet melodrama. I don’t think its coincidence that hamstring pulls/tears by non-competitive amateurs is now so worrisome/commonplace.

Anyway, the advice from others is good. Ease back into the groove of running and pick up speed with each workout. But also, just get started already.
[/quote]

I have seen way too may tears on people coming to our track and field team fresh new, sprinting at 100% after a week, and pulling their hamstrings within the next month. Especially eople who are just good sprinters by nature.[/quote]

Fair enough.

I rarely see people doing more than jogging, and to be honest I don’t even see correct running mechanics where the hamstrings are definitely firing all that often either. again, speaking of non-competitive amateurs.

[quote]chillain wrote:

[quote]niksamaras wrote:

[quote]chillain wrote:

[quote]niksamaras wrote:

[quote]chillain wrote:

[quote]Kardash wrote:
Is it safe for me to start sprinting?[/quote]

Almost surely, yes.

You know, before the internet, there was really no way for people to check-in BEFORE picking themselves up and just getting after it already. And this was prob a good thing.
[/quote]

Teared hamstrings are NOT a good thing.[/quote]

More internet melodrama. I don’t think its coincidence that hamstring pulls/tears by non-competitive amateurs is now so worrisome/commonplace.

Anyway, the advice from others is good. Ease back into the groove of running and pick up speed with each workout. But also, just get started already.
[/quote]

I have seen way too may tears on people coming to our track and field team fresh new, sprinting at 100% after a week, and pulling their hamstrings within the next month. Especially eople who are just good sprinters by nature.[/quote]

Fair enough.

I rarely see people doing more than jogging, and to be honest I don’t even see correct running mechanics where the hamstrings are definitely firing all that often either. again, speaking of non-competitive amateurs.

[/quote]

With normal people it is less mechanics than sheer tightness, bad muscular endurance and bad mobility all combined together in an accident waiting to happen. It’s not that sprints are injury inducing things themselves so much as the fact that a guy who has trouble riding his bike for 5 minutes without gasping for air and has been sitting with completely immobile and shortened hamstrings for hours a day every day is asking for trouble to start sprinting right away.

He’s got to get used to running before sprinting becomes a great tool IMHO.

Look at some articles by Martin Rooney, also to answer your question, yes.
Make sure you check out a proper technique and ease into it, don’t just burst into a full blown sprint after walking outside.

[quote]SKELAC wrote:

If you decide to do some sprints,do uphill sprints until you get in better shape.Theres much lower chance of hamstring pull sprinting uphill.[/quote]

x 2

[quote]Aragorn wrote:

[quote]chillain wrote:

[quote]niksamaras wrote:

[quote]chillain wrote:

[quote]niksamaras wrote:

[quote]chillain wrote:

[quote]Kardash wrote:
Is it safe for me to start sprinting?[/quote]

Almost surely, yes.

You know, before the internet, there was really no way for people to check-in BEFORE picking themselves up and just getting after it already. And this was prob a good thing.
[/quote]

Teared hamstrings are NOT a good thing.[/quote]

More internet melodrama. I don’t think its coincidence that hamstring pulls/tears by non-competitive amateurs is now so worrisome/commonplace.

Anyway, the advice from others is good. Ease back into the groove of running and pick up speed with each workout. But also, just get started already.
[/quote]

I have seen way too may tears on people coming to our track and field team fresh new, sprinting at 100% after a week, and pulling their hamstrings within the next month. Especially eople who are just good sprinters by nature.[/quote]

Fair enough.

I rarely see people doing more than jogging, and to be honest I don’t even see correct running mechanics where the hamstrings are definitely firing all that often either. again, speaking of non-competitive amateurs.

[/quote]

With normal people it is less mechanics than sheer tightness, bad muscular endurance and bad mobility all combined together in an accident waiting to happen. It’s not that sprints are injury inducing things themselves so much as the fact that a guy who has trouble riding his bike for 5 minutes without gasping for air and has been sitting with completely immobile and shortened hamstrings for hours a day every day is asking for trouble to start sprinting right away.

He’s got to get used to running before sprinting becomes a great tool IMHO.[/quote]

Completely agree with this. I really like one day speed work (not all out, max effort), one day tempo (longer, “comfortably hard”) run and one long (for you), easy pace run as a jumping off point for integrating running into your training.

I have this general rule with non-athletic people: as long as you’re not
a) very fat
or
b) a tall combination of muscle and thick bone underneath some fat,

you should be able to comfortably jog for an hour.

That is basically the first step in a foolproof running curriculum.

Step 2 would be working on technique and tempo- intervals fit nicely here.

As you get better and understand your running disposition, sprinting would be the next step.

For athletic, sporty people, you can pretty much start with sprinting after some short assessments.
Note that by athletic I certainly don’t mean bodybuilders.

If you’ve exclusively trained your muscles hard for some time, I would strongly suggest to start v-e-r-y cautious!

I’d start with something a lower speed.

[quote]niksamaras wrote:
I have seen way too may tears on people coming to our track and field team fresh new, sprinting at 100% after a week, and pulling their hamstrings within the next month. Especially eople who are just good sprinters by nature.[/quote]

– bumped for the numerous sprinting questions/threads in the forum lately –

Just so we’re absolutely clear, one should basically NEVER be sprinting at 100% intensity.

There’s some excellent articles on sprinting in the archives here (search: Erick Minor, Lee Boyce) and pretty sure it was one of them who phrased it as such: unless one is sprinting in competition or for pro ball contract, 70% or 80% intensity is plenty adequate.

Yes you may just make sure you are spending time in strength training and also spending time on flexibility. Most of all with any program please use your head and now when to call it quits. High intensity training requires long rest intervals and short sessions.

[quote]theBird wrote:
Maybe start with some easy jogging first. More so to get your body used to the impact and actually running.

I suggest the “couch to 5m program”.

Uncle Bird.

tweet[/quote]

I like that program, but I’ve seen beginner runners spend a year before they can get it down. It’s designed to get you to a 30 minute 5k, which is tough for a lot of people.

Really, running when overweight is just bad for the knees even though you can minimize the torture doing pose running. Just check out the Biggest Loser, and you’ll often see people on crutches for shin splints or with massive ice on their knees within the first month of them starting out. And those people have doctors on call to help them out.

I suggest low impact cardio (swimming and biking) after getting an okay from your doctor. And a strict diet. Once the weight is down, then consider running. And at least look up pose running.

I wouldn’t even consider sprinting until you have developed a base foundation to work from, meaning that you can handle running 20 miles a week.