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When 30-10-30 Has Run Its Course, Gains Slow Down

This may rub the wrong way, and sorry if it does, but I was looking for something to do when 30-10-30 ran its course on me. It worked fantastically. Had I adhered to the diet and water and could actually get enough sleep, it would have been much better.
I’m just at the point where I want to get away from it for a while. Wanted something completely different. So different that when I get back to 30-10-30 it will then be the drastic change needed for adaptation to happen again.
Read some things on anti-glycolytic training that sparked my interest.
Any thoughts on it? Thinking of running with it for 4 to 5 weeks.
basically, working on the minute. One set 10 reps one arm kettlebell swing, next minute using the other hand, skip the next minute, 10 reps dip on the 4th minute and 5th minute, rest for 6th minute, repeat for 5 series.
3-5 sets of bent over row and goblet squats for sets of 10. EMOM was a bit too little, so EMO1.5M? at 0:00, 10 reps goblet, @1:30, bent over row for 10, @ 3:00 goblet, etc
Still finding my weights. Will add some when perfect reps can be completed and it is obvious that more weight is needed. Focus as I did on 30-10-30 with precision reps.

I wasn’t as spent as I was with 30-10-30 but the training felt complete.
Just looking at thoughts. I want newbie gains again when I swing back to 30-10-30.

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Can you trigger newbie gains just by rotating between different exercise programs? I’m skeptical of that. At least it is something I’ve never experienced.

Newbie gains are newbie gains because you are in fact a newbie. No longer being a newbie you will never made gains like that again.

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Don’t listen to the doubters.

Your plan is like “Block Periodization” which is super well researched and widely used world-wide, in many sports, for 40+ years.

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When the gains from Block A (30-10-30) slow down you move to Block B (anti -glycolic) to some of those easy to get improvements.

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Sure… once you plateau with simple progression schemes, you can continue to make progress by using more advanced programs. But that really isn’t the same thing as ‘newbie gains’. Those intermediate and advanced lifters make gains, but at much slower rates than beginners, because they have already tapped into a good part of their genetic potential.

That period of rapid growth which beginners can experience can never be reproduced, unless you stop lifting for awhile and lose some muscle mass by detraining. Then, when you restart, you will regain quickly due to the muscle memory thing. Or you can start using steroids, and get a second newbie surge of a different kind.

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Point taken. “Newbie gains” was a poor choice of words. Perhaps newfound gains? Renewed gains? Breaking plateau.
Not sure about the labels simple and advanced. Effective and ineffective sure.
I have a few questions. 30-10-30 produces a ton of lactate. Is this systemic or regional?
The reason I ask is I was curious why in the book there is a reduction of time between sets. IF a longer rest allows the lactate to clear and/or allows for more performance output then isn’t this as important or as effective as the metabolic impact of cutting the rest time between the exercises? Even deeper inroad?

Interesting question. Lactate is produced by the working muscles, so that is local. But it ends up in the blood, which circulates everywhere.

I was curious enough that I did a little searching. Found this study, which maybe could give you some insights:

I don’t know about the specifics of how 30-10-30 manages and used lactic acid to get gains through metabolic factors.

But if one program relied lactic acid and training through the burn as it accumulated, and another was built on not generating it, jumping back and forth between them could be a cool way to periodize your training to get renewed gains.