T Nation

What's Wrong With My Thyroid?


#1

Hi guys
So currently I’m on trt @ 125mg/week for 5 weeks. I feel better mood wise/depression/anxiety.
I also feel my muscles harden when I flex now. Which it didn’t before But the energy is still not there.

I wonder if the thyroid could be can issue. On all my tests my TSH has been 3.2-3.3. Which as I understand could be slightly elevated. What confuses me is that my T4 and T3 are on the absolute top of the range which should mean that my metabolism is very high but it’s not. Infact I’ve been eating at 1800-1900 calories a day for 3 weeks now without any change in weght.

Lab tests last 2 years:

TSH 3.3
Free T4 20pmol/L (10-22)


TSH 3.0
Free T4 20pmol/L (10-22)


TSH 2.3
Free T4 20pmol/L (10-22)
Free T3 5.4 (3.3-6.5)
TPO-AB <10 (0-35)
S-TRAK <1,0 (0-1.0)

Symptoms I have:
Extreme tiredness
Consipation
Dry skin
Very puffy face (at or around same bf%)
Bloated around stomach and face (feels so atleast)
Low temps in the morning
Feeling cold easily

What could be wrong? My numbers look great but I feel like I’m matching alot of symptoms. The only thing I can think of is rT3 but I don’t have access to that specific test.


#2

In December you contemplated getting AM Cortisol tested.

Please do not create new threads were you past info is disconnected.

Please post your on-TRT lab work with ranges.
Problems might be in part E2 related.

TSH should not be high, there could be something wrong beyond the basic stuff.
Where did we get with iodine issues?
Have you been tested for thyroid autoimmune problems? - docs may refuse, you are ‘normal’


#3

Hi sorry ksman :frowning: you are right.
I will donate blood this week and get blood tests next week.

There isn’t 4-point cortisol testing in my country.
I did get an AM serum cortisol reading at 21.7ug/dl.

The ‘‘TPO-AB’’ stands for anti-thyroid antibodies and S-TRAK stands for TSH-receptor antibodies.
I assume the results show that they were negative?


#4

Your AM cortisol was good and thyroid autoimmune disease does not appear to be a factor.