T Nation

What Works Best for the 4-0 Set?

This year I had a really good improvements on many lifts following a modified version of ‘Big Beyond Relief’. This is pretty much a full body routine 4 times a week. I had not expected this at all.

Next year I hit the big 4-0 and I wonder if the improvement on this system (which I was not getting with a split) is related to aging? What styles of training are you all finding seems to work best in this age group?

I was just mulling over this subject because a few days ago, a young guy at the gym asked me if I do “full body” every workout. I hadn’t really thought about it in terms of full body vs a split in a long time. Over time I’ve migrated toward heavy compound movements, and I’ve positioned them across from each other so I can get my best performance on the biggest lifts (clean, squat, bench, overhead) each week. I rarely do isolations anymore, and I never do high volume work.

I’ve also adopted an attitude that some lifts are “just” assistance lifts. For instance, I’ll kill myself on bench, but then I’ll go easy on dips. I lift weights three days each week, about an hour each time. Sometimes I feel that’s not enough, other times I feel I’m on the cusp of physically breaking down.

I admit I sometimes have a habit of focusing too narrowly on something. Plus I have zero friends who lift. So I’m also interested to hear others’ experiences in regards to what works well for 40-ish folks. I turn 40 next spring and am planning to mark the occasion by going for new maxes. I want to really knock it out of the park.

Same exact thing that worked for me when I was younger, except recovery takes longer.

The other thing that I noticed over the age of 40 is the need for more warmups/mobility and speed work.

Hope this helps

[quote]nanning wrote:
I was just mulling over this subject because a few days ago, a young guy at the gym asked me if I do “full body” every workout. I hadn’t really thought about it in terms of full body vs a split in a long time. Over time I’ve migrated toward heavy compound movements, and I’ve positioned them across from each other so I can get my best performance on the biggest lifts (clean, squat, bench, overhead) each week. I rarely do isolations anymore, and I never do high volume work.

I’ve also adopted an attitude that some lifts are “just” assistance lifts. For instance, I’ll kill myself on bench, but then I’ll go easy on dips. I lift weights three days each week, about an hour each time. Sometimes I feel that’s not enough, other times I feel I’m on the cusp of physically breaking down.

I train each movement once every 14 days. Example week 1 day 1 upper body pressing, week 1 day 2 upper body pulling then 5 days off. Week k 2 day 1 legs / posterior chain, week 2 day 2 legs and posterior chain again then 5 days off . start over. the leg / posterior chain days include unilateral work and front loaded work to keep possible imbalances in check. most people think 14 days is too long, but it’s not. i am 39 . i have trained low frequency for a long time and it works. the body takes a long time to heal and supercompensate. the supercompensation peak sits around 14-16 days for me as the intensity increased over the years.

I admit I sometimes have a habit of focusing too narrowly on something. Plus I have zero friends who lift. So I’m also interested to hear others’ experiences in regards to what works well for 40-ish folks. I turn 40 next spring and am planning to mark the occasion by going for new maxes. I want to really knock it out of the park.[/quote]

I train each movement once every 14 days. Example week 1 day 1 upper body pressing, week 1 day 2 upper body pulling then 5 days off. Week 2 day 1 legs / posterior chain, week 2 day 2 legs and posterior chain again then 5 days off . start over. the leg / posterior chain days include unilateral work and front loaded work to keep possible imbalances in check. most people think 14 days is too long, but it’s not. i am 39 .

i have trained low frequency for a long time and it works. the body takes a long time to heal and supercompensate. the supercompensation peak sits around 14-16 days for me as the intensity increased over the years.

[quote]QE4 wrote:
I train each movement once every 14 days. Example week 1 day 1 upper body pressing, week 1 day 2 upper body pulling then 5 days off. Week 2 day 1 legs / posterior chain, week 2 day 2 legs and posterior chain again then 5 days off . start over. the leg / posterior chain days include unilateral work and front loaded work to keep possible imbalances in check. most people think 14 days is too long, but it’s not. i am 39 .

i have trained low frequency for a long time and it works. the body takes a long time to heal and supercompensate. the supercompensation peak sits around 14-16 days for me as the intensity increased over the years.
[/quote]

and what kind of results are you getting with this method?

[quote]PeteS wrote:

[quote]QE4 wrote:
I train each movement once every 14 days. Example week 1 day 1 upper body pressing, week 1 day 2 upper body pulling then 5 days off. Week 2 day 1 legs / posterior chain, week 2 day 2 legs and posterior chain again then 5 days off . start over. the leg / posterior chain days include unilateral work and front loaded work to keep possible imbalances in check. most people think 14 days is too long, but it’s not. i am 39 .

i have trained low frequency for a long time and it works. the body takes a long time to heal and supercompensate. the supercompensation peak sits around 14-16 days for me as the intensity increased over the years.
[/quote]

and what kind of results are you getting with this method? [/quote]