T Nation

What to Use for Blocks for SGHP?


#1

For the SGHP, what can I use for the blocks?

I don't have two benches, but I do have a rack. Can I just do these from the pins?

Is there another cheap-ish DIY alternative to blocks?


#2

I use 5 gallon pails. Couple bucks a piece.


#3

Thanks. How many did you end up using? Just two?


#4

I like to use 2 on each side. That seems to be the magic height for me.


#5

The rack will not work for most people. Few racks are wide enough to take a real snatch grip without risking snapping your fingers. And from experience the feeling of lifting in a cage always throws me off (I always squat OUTSIDE the power rack).

I personally use my old winter tires!


#6

I have tried using the end of the bench and resting the loaded bar in the middle so the ends of the bar are free to put your grip on.... just make sure your knees are clear when you pull....


#7

I do this also but I am not using enough weight yet to damage the bench or the bar. As I get stronger on this lift I will use something else. The most I have done so far is 175. I don't know if I should go much higher than 200 using one bench like that. Any thoughts?


#8

I used to stack those little plastic step-up things at my old gym.
They seemed to hold up well.


#9

I use the flat bench ..... and I've used about 200 lbs .... and seems to be fine ....


#10

I just ended up buying 5 gallon buckets for about $2.50 a piece. I've got 3 stacked on each side for now (I'm using metal plates, not bumper plates, and 25s are currently the biggest plates), but it worked fine.

The bottom edges of the buckets are a bit beat up from the plates hitting them, but otherwise it worked well.

Thanks howie for the pointer.


#11

you are joking?

1) its pretty much impossible for you to damage the bar this way... the force exterted on the bar by the bench will replicate that of a sumo deadlift.... people deadlift A LOT more than 200, and i'm pretty sure the bar is still smiling.

2) as for the bench, imagine sitting on the bench, seated military presses with say 150. lets say you way 180, thats over 300lbs of force on the bench.. likewise the bench will be fine. if you want to spread the application of force across a larger area of the bench, try putting a thin wooden block between the 2 (not that you will need do i don't think).


#12

@Iboro21 :

Before critcizing other's answers, just ask yourself if your reasoning is OK.

Both of your arguments are invalid since the bar has a lot of acceleration at the end of the descending part. It hits the bench with a lot of force.

When you do Military Press, the force applied on the bench is always the same since the whole compound body-bar is not accelerating.

And 150lbs doesn't equal 150 lbs of force.

So, It's possible that the gym's benches of ConceptHenry aren't strong enough to support that load of force.


#13

I would also like to add that I'm snatch grip high pulling off the bench .... kinda like off blocks .... and then subsequent reps are from the hang ..... so I don't drop the weight onto the bench ...... I absorb it coming down ..... it is also the right height for me ( I'm short)


#14

No problem buddy. Happy lifting!


#15

No. There is no similarity at all between a SGHP and a sumo dead. If you are doing it correctly, which I now assume you don't.


#16

That's a good idea with the tires; might switch to something like that if these buckets don't hold up.

Also once I figured out a proper snatch grip, there's no way I could possibly have done that in a power rack. I just hadn't ever used a grip quite that wide.


#17

that isnt true at all!

no one drops the bar onto the blocks during SGHP's. you catch it on your thighs and lower it to the blocks/bench whatever -atleast thats what 99% of people i train with do.

so the only reaction force is when the bar is just resting on the bench, before you pick it up.

so damage to bar is a factor of the application of reaction force from the bench. since the bench/bar isnt moving, it IS the same as a sumo deadlift grip on the bar.

damage to the bench is exactly the same. since the bar isnt moving, its the same as sitting on it, holding weight in some form (military press etc).

i don't know anyone that drops the bar onto supports. (maybe the last inch or so)

lastly, i didn't criticise anyone. i reassured him that the bench and bar would not be damaged. -i literally NEVER criticise anyone unless its constructive/i can offer advice.


#18

THE FORCE OF THE BENCH ON THE BAR is like a sumo deadlift -the bench is 8 or so inches wide, same as a sumo grip, so the pressure felt by the bar is the same as a sumo deadlift... our hands a few inches apart, trying to stop the bar going down, just like a bench, that is a few inches wide.

of course i dont SGHP with a sumo deadlift grip lol. he was wondering about damage to the bar/bench when using the bench as 'blocks' so the issue is only when the bar is resting on the bench, nothing to do with the actual movement.


#19

thats a good idea for HDL sets, but for your clusters you should start from the blocks/bench, as you will get a much better starting position, and each cluster rep will act as training for your ramp next time around.