T Nation

What to do With Ground Beef?

I think i’m developing a mild case of taste loss and i need YOUR help to stop this disease thats spreading across our country.

I buy ground beef and then i make hamburgers. Nothing else.

What else is there?

I am following berardi’s massive eating plan of having Protein and carbs together, and protein and fats together.

I used to eat spaghetti and meatballs like crazy. Now What?

The old lady does wonders with ground beef. We do a semi south beach diet, and she has a bunch of recipes that use it. Let me know if you want some of them.

put taco seasoning in it and use some low carb tortillas, or make bodybuilders chili or throw it in w/ some sauted tomatoes, zuchini, garlic and onions.

Chili.

Lots of good recipes on the web and if you are careful with the ingredients, it can be a nutritional powerhouse.

My favorite:

2lb lean ground beef
4 large potatoes
1 can cut green beans
1 can corn
2 packets brown gravy mix
1/2 onion
salt, pepper, garlic powder

brown the ground beef with the onions. Peel, boil and mash the potatoes. When the beef is done, drain off any excess liquid. Make the brown gravy according to instructions. Combine gravy, beef, veggies, salt/pepper/garlic to taste and bring to a boil.

Transfer this to a large pan and top with the potatoes. Place in an oven set at 375 degrees and bake until the top starts to brown. Bam! Shepard’s Pie.

It’s a lot of food that reheats great.

Meatloaf?

Pack a handfull into a portabella cap,season with your favorite spices, top with a slice of tomatoe and some good mozzarella, bake at 350 until done(20 mins.).Then eat!
You do have to eat big to get big, but it doesn’t have to be a chore. I like to get creative in the kitchen.It’s a lot of fun and the results can’t be beat.After a few years of this, I have a hard time finding resturants that aren’t a dissapointment.

Berardi has a decent recipe in his cookbook on thai ground beef.

There are lots of options out there. Probably my favorite is spaghetti with meat sauce.

You can also cook it with taco mix and have it on low carb tortillas.

Chili is also good.

Taco meat, Manwich (use like 1/2 serving for both, unless you have an IV of water as you’re eating them!) Meatballs, Ground Beef Pizza (Small Boboli pizza crusts 2 per pack, 1/2 Skim Mozzerella, a lil’ fresh spinach, olives, mushrooms, HOMEMADE sauce!!!) Those are just a few that I rotate.

[quote]sam747 wrote:
put taco seasoning in it and use some low carb tortillas, or make bodybuilders chili or throw it in w/ some sauted tomatoes, zuchini, garlic and onions.[/quote]

Taco seasoning is a great spice-pack to many meat dishes. But be warned…
Many/Most Taco packets contain Monosodiumglutimate MSG.

Aside from the fact that MSG isn’t really healthy for you (yes - moderation)…personally, I am a little sensative to it, and it makes me beet-red…making me feel like I have a hangover (without ever gone to the party/bar)

chilli rocks.

an italian style meal(bolegnaise)

Meat-iza:

mix mince with 200ml stock.

place in baking tin (flat like a pizza) and in the over for about 20 mins.

pour off XS fluid

Top as per Pizza

back in oven.

(Low carb pizza.)

Tacos

1 pound ground beef (I use the 93/7)
1 Tbsp ground cumin
1 Tbsp minced garlic
1 can black beans

Brown the meat. Add the cumin and garlic, then add the beans - including the juice.

I put some in a bowl and top it with the hottest hotsauce I have. Damn good eatin’.

[quote]StrongMan wrote:
sam747 wrote:
put taco seasoning in it and use some low carb tortillas, or make bodybuilders chili or throw it in w/ some sauted tomatoes, zuchini, garlic and onions.

Taco seasoning is a great spice-pack to many meat dishes. But be warned…
Many/Most Taco packets contain Monosodiumglutimate MSG.

Aside from the fact that MSG isn’t really healthy for you (yes - moderation)…personally, I am a little sensative to it, and it makes me beet-red…making me feel like I have a hangover (without ever gone to the party/bar)
[/quote]

Actually MSG is just fine for you considering it simply a glutamate. Glutamate occurs naturally in many foods, and tomatoes, mushrooms and some cheeses are particularly high in glutamate. There is a reason that tomatoes spread so rapidly around the world from the New World and that’s because they have a ton of glutamate and make everything taste better (just like MSG). MSG and naturally occuring gluatamate are metabolized the same way. And no studies have actually been able to show that people have reactions to MSG or glutamate at normal concentrations (including the sort of concentrations you’d find in Asian food). Like anything a tiny proportion of the population might be sensitive to MSG/Glutamate, but most people who think they are sensitive either have a food allergy to something else cooked with the glutamate or they’re having a psychosomatic reaction. Nevermind that the sodium content in MSG is considerabley less than the sodium content of NaCl. The MSG is bad for you thing is just another legend. If you eat a ton of it, sure. But, generally only a sprinkling is added to food and really what you have to watch out for is the NaCl content of prepackaged goods and restuarant foods (Asian foods might have a sprinkle of MSG, but once they’re done adding soy sauce, fish sauce, hoisen sauce, black bean sauce, etc. the NaCl content is way up there, whereas it doesn’t take a boatload of MSG to get the desired effect, and there’s probably as much sodium and glutamate in pasta sauce as Chinese food or seasoning mixes).

http://student.ucr.edu/~dshad001/chili.html

Meatloaf was mentioned, so here is a few quick recipes for meatloaf with varied tastes to please your tummies.

Vince

Meatloaf Recipes

It seems that cooking for several days ahead, always revolves around a few simple recipes that just seem to get the job done. Small variations in the recipes can make a huge difference in the taste, and also minimizing boredom. I have always made small meatloaf?s which provide a couple of servings, and by making them small, I can freeze a few ahead, and also interweave a few chicken and fish dishes, to break up the boredom. I have included a few recipes that I have used, let me know how they work out for you, and what variations you have on the following recipes.

Chef Julie Manring provided the following recipe; she is the owner of the In-Home Gourmet, a personal chef and catering service in Columbus, Ohio.

Meatloaf

1/2 cup finely chopped bell pepper
1/4 cup diced onion
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 teaspoon minced jalapeno
Salt and pepper to taste
2 teaspoons Italian seasoning
1 pound very lean beef
1 egg

Saute pepper onion and seasonings in olive oil until softened and aromas are released. Cool mixture and combine in a mixing bowl with beaten egg and meat, mix well and place in a loaf pan sprayed with non-stick spray. Cover with foil, and bake at 400 degrees approximately 30 minutes. Lift foil; check temperature with an instant read thermometer. At 160 degrees Fahrenheit (in center of loaf), the meatloaf is done.

Makes 2 servings
Nutritional information per serving: 59.6 grams protein, 3.25 grams carbohydrates, and 17.5 grams fat

The next recipe is from the July 2004 Muscle and Fitness issue, provided by Laura Creavalle.

Mini Salsa Meatloaf

15 ounces extra lean turkey or extra lean ground beef
3 tablespoon yellow corn meal
1/2 cup diced onion
1 medium jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced
1/4 cup egg substitute
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup mild or hot salsa
Non-stick cooking spray

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Spray four large size muffin cups with non-stick cooking spray. In a medium-mixing bowl, combine ground meat with corn meal, onion, jalapeno, egg substitute, and salt. Mix well. Fill each prepared muffin cup with an equal amount of meat mixture. Bake 25-25 minutes until cooked through (165 degrees F. for ground turkey; 160 degrees F. for ground beef). Place on a plate and top with 1 Tablespoon salsa each. Serve with green salad and/or rice. Makes four mini meatloaves.

Nutritional information: Per mini meatloaf: 170 calories, 29 grams protein, 9 grams carbohydrate, 4 gram fat, 1 gram fiber.

The next recipe was provided in the Better Homes and Gardens New Dieters Cookbook.

Individual Pineapple Meatloaves

1 beaten egg
1/2 cup quick cooking rolled oats
1/2 cup finely chopped onion
1/2 cup finely chopped green bell pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 pound lean ground beef
1 8-ounce can crushed pineapple (juice pack), drained
2 tablespoon bottled sweet and sour sauce or barbecue sauce (optional)

In a large mixing bowl stir together egg, oats, onion, green pepper, and salt. Add beef and pineapple; mix well. Divide mixture into 6 equal portions. Shape each portion into a 4 inch x 2-inch loaf. Place loaves in a 13 x 9 x 2-inch pan. Bake uncovered, in a 350-degree oven for 30-35 minutes or until meat is no longer pink. Top each loaf with 1 teaspoon of the sweet and sour or barbecue sauce, if desired. Serves 6.

Nutritional information per serving: 186 calories, 18 grams protein, 10 grams carbohydrates, 8 grams fat

And finally, probably my favorite recipe, this is from the LowCarbFriends recipes board (www.lowcarbfriends.com). I calculated the nutritional information using ground round.

Armadillo Eggs

1 pound lean ground round
4 jalapenos – whole (small peppers if possible)
4 ounces Philadelphia cream cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
Lea & Perins Worcestershire sauce
Lemon pepper

Add seasonings to hamburger meat, mix well, and place in refrigerator for about 3 hours. Cut tops off jalapenos; take out seeds, and stuff peppers with 1-ounce cream cheese. (You may want to allow cream cheese to soften first. If large peppers are used you can cut peppers into 1 inch rings). Individually wrap each stuffed pepper with hamburger meat, leaving no part exposed. Shape into balls causing meat to adhere smoothly. Grill on barbeque pit. Serves 4.

Nutritional information per serving: 204 calories, 28.9 grams protein, 6.2 carbohydrates, 4.6 grams fat

So all the talk about MSG being a dangerous neurotoxin is total BS?! Can you point me toward your source(s) for claiming that glutimates are naturally occuring and that lab-made MSG is okay to consume on a regular basis?

Thanks,

TopSirloin

I think people just believe MSG is bad because it is used to mask the taste of spoiled meat.

Forget Taco seasoning mixes…You need three basic spices to make anything Tex-Mex…

CUMIN
CHILI POWDER
SALT

You have more control with flavor without all the extra crap packet into those premade spice packs.

Need to thicken anything? some corn starch mixed with water, pour in bring to boil…Nice thick chili, Sloppy joes, Baked potato topping, Make a big old pot with Ground Turkey Or lean ground beef and keep around all week!

Sorry Dude, MSG may not be bad for you…but it’s bad news for me.

I have NO FOOD allergies what-so-ever. But if I have chinese food that does use it, I turn beet-red, and often times get the squirts.

As far as I’m concerned, the shit is poison. No legend. And I have never had a reaction to any other food like MSG-seasoned foods.

Taco-Bell taco seasoning comes to mind…I added it to my tuna once, and BAM! redface all over again. I didn’t even know it had MSG, until I looked after the symptons became apparent.

[quote]rg73 wrote:
StrongMan wrote:
sam747 wrote:
put taco seasoning in it and use some low carb tortillas, or make bodybuilders chili or throw it in w/ some sauted tomatoes, zuchini, garlic and onions.

Taco seasoning is a great spice-pack to many meat dishes. But be warned…
Many/Most Taco packets contain Monosodiumglutimate MSG.

Aside from the fact that MSG isn’t really healthy for you (yes - moderation)…personally, I am a little sensative to it, and it makes me beet-red…making me feel like I have a hangover (without ever gone to the party/bar)

Actually MSG is just fine for you considering it simply a glutamate. Glutamate occurs naturally in many foods, and tomatoes, mushrooms and some cheeses are particularly high in glutamate. There is a reason that tomatoes spread so rapidly around the world from the New World and that’s because they have a ton of glutamate and make everything taste better (just like MSG). MSG and naturally occuring gluatamate are metabolized the same way. And no studies have actually been able to show that people have reactions to MSG or glutamate at normal concentrations (including the sort of concentrations you’d find in Asian food). Like anything a tiny proportion of the population might be sensitive to MSG/Glutamate, but most people who think they are sensitive either have a food allergy to something else cooked with the glutamate or they’re having a psychosomatic reaction. Nevermind that the sodium content in MSG is considerabley less than the sodium content of NaCl. The MSG is bad for you thing is just another legend. If you eat a ton of it, sure. But, generally only a sprinkling is added to food and really what you have to watch out for is the NaCl content of prepackaged goods and restuarant foods (Asian foods might have a sprinkle of MSG, but once they’re done adding soy sauce, fish sauce, hoisen sauce, black bean sauce, etc. the NaCl content is way up there, whereas it doesn’t take a boatload of MSG to get the desired effect, and there’s probably as much sodium and glutamate in pasta sauce as Chinese food or seasoning mixes).
[/quote]