T Nation

What To Do, Where To Go, After You Hit Rock Bottom?


#61

How did you lose your job?


#62

I work in sales, it’s a cut throat business. They found out I was leaving shortly for this career. Cut me loose. Well, supposed to be leaving. I didn’t really give a fuck about that job but it paid the bills. I got another the same night. I’m good for now


#63

I don’t know what branch you were looking at but have considered another branch? Sounds to me like you have no charges against you, just an arrest. Maybe talk to a recruiter from another branch, tell them you want to be officer. I do know, for USAF, you have to take the Officer Qualification Test prior to being accepted for OCS. Maybe you should consider an active duty gig instead of reserves. Get some real life experience under your belt. Marry that girlfriend, get your first duty station and start living.


#64

Bro, I wasn’t even arrested. I spoke with the officer and records department. We were both just taken into protective custody “for our personal safety.” Neither of us even threw up. Since I wasn’t arrested and didn’t have any charges I don’t understand why I was booted because it doesn’t go against any formal policies. They’re just questioning my judgement at this point. Fair enough. I was doing OCS because it would be manageable alongside my career choice. Honestly I could just join the reserves still or look into another branch definitely, but I don’t see myself enlisting and going active duty. Reason being is I feel like I’m behind as hell on my career, I’ll be 25 in the Spring, still haven’t started my career. I have two interviews coming in the near future one for a small local PD and one for another letter agency. So hope that it works out and they can look past this.


#65

yes. Because of your actions, police felt it necessary to place you in protective custody for your own safety. Perhaps that’s how you should be looking at it.

I fail to see how this matters at all.

Because your actions were so stupid that the city had to use at least one officer’s time and efforts just to make sure you didn’t hurt yourself. Seems pretty clear to me. Not sure where the misunderstanding is. They don’t need a formal policy in place to judge a fuck-up as grounds for terminating employment of a dude who hasn’t even actually started working for them.

This is PRECISELY the wrong thinking that I mentioned earlier. Your skull is thick, my friend. You’re just not getting it. There is no schedule to be on with your career. Some people, very successful people, find their true calling in their 40’s, or even later. Looking at your own life with such a narrow perspective will limit you forever. It will force you into choices that you shouldn’t be making. It’s why you wanted to buy a house when you shouldn’t be. It’s why you lied to your girlfriend, who you decided is the girl you should marry even though you’ve only been together 5 months or whatever. Are you seeing a pattern? You’re pushing to make life events happen before they should be, and this will absolutely result in a shitty life by the time you’re 30 or so. Pump the brakes, take your time.


#66

I’m still talking about a commission, not enlisted. If you went security police as a 2nd LT active duty, you would get great experience.

25 isnt a hallmark. I flunked out of college the first time, went active duty for 4 years, then college for 7 years straight for a BS and MS. Got my first real job at 32. The maturity you could bring as a commissioned officer is worth a ton.


#67

To piggyback on Flip’s post, here’s something worth reading.


#68

Do you think your active duty enlistment had a profound impact on your life?


#69

Definitely, it made me a more serious student when I went back to school. By then, I had a kid and was serious about my responsibility to her and to support my family. Now remember, I was a “cold war” soldier, serving pre-Desert Storm so my enlistment was not like that the the kids are seeing nowadays. Mine was safe and stateside.

With that said, my AFSC saw every job there was in the USAF and I really decided I wanted to be a “professional” and not a blue collar worker. We definitely need welders, plumbers, electricians, painters, etc. but I realized I wanted my degree.


#70

This. It is hard as hell to be put in charge of dozens of people in the private sector until you’re a bit older and a known commodity. My 23 year old cousin is ranger qualified and leads bigger teams than I do at 29.

Plus if you want to learn to lead (be worth following) and not just manage it’s hard to beat the military.


#71

Yes Sir, and the opportunity to work with a senior NCO and learn from him on how to teach and guide people. @Kpac20, this alone would serve you the rest of your life and teach you to teach those coming up behind you how to be best they can.


#72

Only thing that would worry me is coming off my 3 year B+C


#73

You said yourself, you’ve got friends in who or active duty and using.


#74

Right, but I’m looking into the AF, the OCS is different: it’s 9 weeks straight, wouldn’t be able to bring with me


#75

Well, OTS used to be at Lackland in San Antonio. Not sure anymore. There would definitely be a dry spell but depending on weekend freedom, you could probably work something out to take a shot on weekends.

OR…just do your PCT and get off totally until you get settled.


#76

Sweet. A young gung-ho cop on steroids who also happens to drink to excess and make poor impulsive decisions. That’s what this country needs!

Maybe taking a step back to get your mind right and gain some maturity in the military would be a good thing.


#77

Maybe an unpopular opinion, but I am going to throw it out here. Do not go into the military as a fallback. You are talking about being an officer, which means regardless of what branch of service you go into, you will be responsible for the well-being of the men under your command. That is a massive responsibility, and a huge honor. It should not be taken lightly, and I feel anyone choosing that route should be entirely dedicated to their job.

If you are worried about how OCS will interfere with your steroid cycle, or concerned that your time spent in the service will interfere with your career goals, then it is clear your main priority is not focused on your future men, but on your own development. That’s fine, pretty much every action a person takes in their life is done out of self interest and development. But the military has enough selfish leadership as is, don’t take advantage of the opportunity at the expense of your sailors/soldiers/airmans well being.


#78

To further expand on this, if one of the things holding you back from military service is that you fear it will severely limit your ability to engage in illegal activities regularly, that is most likely a sign that the military will be a poor fit.


#79

So, did you ever explain why, at 25, you’re on a 3 year blast and cruise?


#80

Been training a long time man. Since I was 13.