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What To Do About Lagging Bodyparts?

Just curious to see when you guys first noticed a specific body part was lagging behind and what you did to rectify it. I haven’t been training long enough to have a lagging body part; my whole body is weak.

now now, you mustn’t be so hard on yourself.

for me…shoulders, back, and legs…

oh and arms

train it more often

What I’ve decided to do, because I want my V-taper to be my strongest point so i’m gonna treat it like a lagging bodypart. I set my week up with

Monday: Back and Shoulders
Tuesday: Chest and Arms
Thursday: Legs
Friday: Back and Shoulders

You have to try to prevent as much run off as possible though, for instance, I can’t have Deadlifts on my Friday back day because my lower back would be toast from squatting and straight-leg deadlifting/good morning on leg day.

glutes, abs, upper back. Train them often, train them hard.

train you back / shoulder 2 x more then your arms… thats what i did to fix a shoulder injury turned problem I had…

bring them up.

I’m on the end of the spectrum with Warren. Except I’m 6’2. My lower body responds by me just thinking about leg day. My arms I would have to say are my main weakness that I’m beating the shit out of them. 2x per week. Heavy and light days. So far so good

so from what I’ve read it seems a higher training frequency is needed to develop a lagging body part, at what point does additional frequency become redundant? would you say, that one is doing to much when your ability to recover is compromised?

[quote]Omca wrote:
so from what I’ve read it seems a higher training frequency is needed to develop a lagging body part, at what point does additional frequency become redundant? would you say, that one is doing to much when your ability to recover is compromised?[/quote]

yep…that’s the key to gaining muscle mass for all muscles as fast as physically possible, by coming as close to crossing the line as possible, for long periods of time.

[quote]Omca wrote:
so from what I’ve read it seems a higher training frequency is needed to develop a lagging body part, at what point does additional frequency become redundant? would you say, that one is doing to much when your ability to recover is compromised?[/quote]

It depends on you, the only way to find out is try and see what works for you. Eating more always helps with recovery.

Is there a limit to foods ability to help with recovery or is that a personal thing, it doesn’t seem logical that continually stuffing your face would make you recover faster than eating slightly above maintenance

[quote]Omca wrote:
Is there a limit to foods ability to help with recovery or is that a personal thing, it doesn’t seem logical that continually stuffing your face would make you recover faster than eating slightly above maintenance [/quote]

I’m sure there’s a limit, but your body wants to adapt. Of course, the caveat is within reason. Also, it really is personal, some people can train much, much more than others, eat less and still recover quicker. However, if you’re only training certain body parts more frequently you should be able to recover better with more food.

[quote]Ratchet wrote:
train you back / shoulder 2 x more then your arms… thats what i did to fix a shoulder injury turned problem I had… [/quote]

QFT, i did this with my lower back injury, worked it much more and it did wonders in the end.

Omca, if you don’t have any lagging bodyparts, why do you ask? Not challenging you, but I am curious as to why this should be an issue for you so early.

Anyway, to address the question…really depends WHY the bodypart is lagging. Usually it’s down to one of, or any combination, of the following (in no particular order):

  1. Overtraining - happens with a lot with arms, being that they are both a showy set of muscles, and they get hit on all non-leg exercises, so these are often the first to ‘mysteriously’ grow when the trainer takes some time off;

  2. Genetics - I have (relatively) thin arms as did my mother and her father. You may not think 17.5" upper arms are thin, but when you consider I have a 50" chest, clearly there’s a disproportion.

One way to tackle this is - shock, horror!! - dropping compound work in favour of isolation work. I don’t mean any of that ridiculous stuff where you have one elbow behind your head and your raise the dumbell over it, but rather, heavy bar work like curls and skull-crushers and tricep pulldowns with varying grip-angles.

  1. Injury - might be the bodypart, or a nearby bodypart. Example - I have a small problem with my left shoulder, doesn’t stop me training it but on the heaviest work, my shoulder aches before my triceps do.

This can lead to the arm being UNDER trained, again, I suspect this is the case with me. Of course, a sprained foot, which you don’'t normally train, would mean you couldn’t train the calf above it.

Train the weak part(s) first in your workout.

at 170lbs YOU HAVE NO WEAK PARTS.

gain 50lbs and then see if its still weak

[quote]Clown Face wrote:
at 170lbs YOU HAVE NO WEAK PARTS.

gain 50lbs and then see if its still weak[/quote]

He knows that.

There’s nothing wrong with wanting to learn what people generally do to fix an issue before the issue comes up.

At the same time though, it’s quite likely that once someone is developed enough to have lagging parts they will have figured out on their own what to do about it.

I’m a fan of frequency, and volume (not usually at the same time though!). The Heavy/light day scheme is a good one. It’s actually one thing I’ve used to make my back my strongest point besides my legs.

Not that I’m worried about it–I’m not going to be in a pose down any time soon and as long as I’m getting stronger and still healthy I won’t worry too much.

I brought my lats up quite a bit when they were weak through frequency and drop-sets. Trained them with special emphasis 2x a week with my back. My favorite technique was a giant quadruple or quintuple drop set–superset chins with lat pull downs in the same grip, getting a good stretch on the lats.

Looked like

a1) chins x 6-10
a2) lat pulldowns 8-10,8-10,10, AM, AM (AM = “as many as possible”)
rest (trust me, you’ll be glad for it at the end)

did the superset 2-3 times through. I only did that on occasion, or 1 time a week of course, but I worked my lats along with the other back day (upper/lower split, not body part)

I’ve found intensity techniques like drop sets and stuff work great.

[quote]Omca wrote:
Just curious to see when you guys first noticed a specific body part was lagging behind and what you did to rectify it. I haven’t been training long enough to have a lagging body part; my whole body is weak. [/quote]

Your main focus should be on compound exercises that get the whole body strong. Eliminate the isolation exercises since those are good only when you have gained enough muscle mass in the larger muscle groups such as the legs and the back.