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What Rep Max to Use?

Hi, I am 16 years old. I play hockey and train my self for about 1year. I just get to the gym and I was wondering... hmmm lemme think, i'll give you an example;

I got a series of 3x6 to do on one of my exercise… what RM should I go for to know the exact pound to put on my 3x6 series ? - life, go with a RM of 10 to do my 3x6 series ? I’m really new so I dont really know.

I’m not really good in spelling but if some of you understand, please let me know.

Thanks to All for reading my post.

[quote]Arsee55 wrote:
Hi, I am 16 years old. I play hockey and train my self for about 1year. I just get to the gym and I was wondering… hmmm lemme think, i’ll give you an example;

I got a series of 3x6 to do on one of my exercise… what RM should I go for to know the exact pound to put on my 3x6 series ? - life, go with a RM of 10 to do my 3x6 series ? I’m really new so I dont really know.

I’m not really good in spelling but if some of you understand, please let me know.

Thanks to All for reading my post.[/quote]

Usually I use a weight that I could max out with 1 or 2 more reps fresh than I’m doing for the set. So if I’m doing 4 sets of 6, I’ll use a weight I would max out around 7 or 8. Basically, I just use the heaviest weight I can to successfully complete all of the sets.

I think that the “proper” weight to use for a certain number if reps is really a trial-and-error process. It’s unlikely that you’ll get it right the first time, but luckily, you have about 60 more years to find out what’s right =).

If I were you, I would load up a weight you think you can do for 3x6 reps and try it for a workout. If it’s too much, decrease it the next time. If it’s too little, increase it. Once you reach a point where it becomes a good workout, repeat until it becomes easy, then increase the weight.

Just guess. Pick a weight and do a set. If it is too easy add more weight. If it is too heavy, take some off.

Don’t get caught up in overthinking things as many do.

[quote]blooey wrote:
If I were you, I would load up a weight you think you can do for 3x6 reps and try it for a workout. If it’s too much, decrease it the next time. If it’s too little, increase it. Once you reach a point where it becomes a good workout, repeat until it becomes easy, then increase the weight.[/quote]

Yhea thanks for hint !=)
1 more question, the last rep ( the 6 one ) should it be medium hard… or hard as hell ?

Honestly trial and error is a good way to go. It took me a few workouts to establish where I was actually taxing my muscles but after that it’s easy to adjust volume and weight to fit whatever you’re doing.

Sorry for double post but the last rep of each set should get progressively harder. Your last rep on set 1 shouldn’t be all that hard, medium I suppose. The second one should be hard. The third should be hard as hell…possibly a failure. Try not to fail but sometimes it happens. If you think you’re going to though just stick it out and put everything you have into finishing the rep. Your body is meant to be able to push itself a bit over the edge if it needs to, and when you finish a rep you thought you had no chance of completing it is one of the best feelings you can have. For me it is at least.

Np for double posting.

Thanks for all your hint guys. That answered my question. The all I had to know.

Thanks again!

Gym is a lifestyle !

[quote]Arsee55 wrote:
blooey wrote:
If I were you, I would load up a weight you think you can do for 3x6 reps and try it for a workout. If it’s too much, decrease it the next time. If it’s too little, increase it. Once you reach a point where it becomes a good workout, repeat until it becomes easy, then increase the weight.

Yhea thanks for hint !=)
1 more question, the last rep ( the 6 one ) should it be medium hard… or hard as hell ?[/quote]

It depends. You should aim to be pushing yourself at the gym, but you’ll have good days and bad days and what’s hard one day may be easy on another.

If you look in your training log (you are keeping a log, yes?), try to match or beat the amount of weight (or the number of reps, or the number of sets) you did in the previous workout. If that’s hard as hell, well good, you’re making progress. If it’s medium, well good, you’re making progress. Increase the weight next time.