T Nation

What I've Learned

Younger guys should read this carefully, the older guys should add to it.

If you have 2 or more regular responsibilities, you need to have your whole day planned by 10A.M.

  This is something I learned during my first year of college. I was trying to Complete programs like the Russian squat routine, working 40 hours over 6 or 7 days at a decently physical job, and a full time college student. I wasted far to much time trying to figure out what I needed to get done, during the time I was supposed to be getting said stuff done. 

When you realize this is happening most people end up procrastinating because they get discouraged. As a result of this my grades suffered. Now I have every days detailed planned the night before, or early in the morning. I have a rough outline of the next few days sketched out in my head all the time.

  1. Work isnt inheritly hard, Any work is hard if you put forth your best effort for an extended period of time

    When I first started in my current job, I thought that because it was more physical, and more demanding that I was working hard. I was wrong. I thought that because I occassionally skipped a break or stayed 10 minutes late that I was a good worker, I was again, wrong.

    I got extremely pissed off and frustrated when my store director told me I had to pick up my pace, I was working faster than the other guy isn’t that good enough? He told me if I didnt I would be back to bagging groceries. To hell with that. Even though I was extremely pissed off I literally ran everywhere, and worked so fast I thought my shoulders were going to explode from the constant movement. That same day my department manager made a comment about how I sounded snippy when I replied to him. I wasnt being snippy I was winded, and that changed the tone of my voice.

    After a few days of pissing and moaning about it to myself, I kept up that fast pace at work, remained extremely polite and respectful. Those two managers who I thought I was going to hate forever and now two of my most inspirational figures. They helped me directly and in ways that I don’t even think they realized.

I learned: trying isn’t good enough. You need to try your hardest at everything, all day, every day.

  1. Be highly adaptive

    Now I still work for the same company, but in another city. I now have worked in 6 of the 7 components of a store. Without really any formal training. Sometimes I feel like it’s because I suck and no one department wants to keep me around. But I know that even without the formal training, putting forth your best effort is noticable, and if I am still getting schedueled without training for months after I must have done something right. I regularilly work 3 or 4 different “jobs” in a week.

    I fought this as hard as I could. I did not want to learn anything new. I wanted to stay in my current position because I had such a tie to the department (see lesson 2), and I was afraid I would be permenantly moved. However financial reasons forced me into it. I dont regret it at all. I learned a lot about networking, improved my ability to pick up information on the fly. I am a better person for this.

  2. Be less of a little bitch than you were yesterday.

    I dont know if I heard this phrase somewhere, or if I formulated it in my brain. However I think about this constantly. If you are always analyzing how you were a little bitch yesterday, and never repeat those actions you’ll be a better person for it. Over time you stop pussing out of big things, but you still need to not be a bitch about the little things. Did you not sleep well last night? When I’m tired I have a hard time looking people in the eyes. I’m pretty good about doing it now. It seems small, but one good impression can take you far.

TLDR: Suck it the fuck up buttercup

  1. If you are not self denying for your own greater purpose, you are not a man.

    When I realized I wasnt going to have any real discretionary money for the next 5+ years I didnt freak out. Why? Because I have priotities. I want to finish school, and possibly go for my masters if I can get into UChicago. I Spend my money on literally 4 things: Gas, food, cigarettes, School. I dont need a lot, I’m busy and constant achievement keeps me amused. Unlock achievements in real live, not on your Xbox

I’ll probably add to and edit my errors later. I’ve been meaning to write down my thoughts lately, and I figured others would appreciate reading.

One thing I’ve learned: even the smartest motherfuckers with an air of unmistakable infallibility about them are wrong some of the time and if you think that one of these people are wrong you should challenge them about it. It instills confidence in oneself and it also encourages people to think more critically and analytically about everything around them.

Another thing I’ve learned: opinions are like assholes; everyone has one, but some of them you wouldn’t come near and others you’d come inside of.

[quote]zephead4747 wrote:
I wasnt going to have any real discretionary money for the next 5+ years[/quote]

[quote]zephead4747 wrote:
cigarettes[/quote]

As long as you own it, man.

While I started tracking how much $$$ I was spending on butts, I quit smoking them.

I later gave up cigarettes for health reasons.

As far as proper planning goes: I found Nate Green’s “Organize Like a Badass” article to be very useful (though I use Excel/Word rather than white boards). For many, this might not fit into their personality type, but I love organization and lists and routine and shit so it’s always nice to lay it out clear as day like that.

While some stuff on his site doesn’t mesh with my personality or preferences, I DO think he has a lot of interesting stuff as far as lifestyle tips go and I generally enjoy reading his shit.

http://www.thenategreenexperience.com/blog/organize-like-a-badass-3-musthave-tools

How long did it take you to learn these little gems?

Lol

When it comes to work drama it’s a fine line between laying down and standing up for your self. Can’t fight every battle. Especially when working in an environement dominated by women lol.

Keeping grounded at my hospital job is easy. Whenever I start to whine and feel sorry for myself regarding my fucked up shifts and other shit out of my control I just have to do a 360 degree turn.

For example lastnight I was in ICU. A patient there was involved in an accident where the van he was in was sideswipped by a flatbed transport truck. Eleven killed, he was one of only two survivors.

In a hospital it’s always better to be an employee than a customer.

2pm
over 25 posts so far today
didn’t read

thumbsupbro.gif

[quote]anonym wrote:

2pm
over 25 posts so far today
didn’t read

thumbsupbro.gif[/quote]

:slight_smile: actually 1 pm here. Still waiting on people to come back for physicals after lunch break.

Also watching workaholics on Netflix.

[quote]Derek542 wrote:
:slight_smile: actually 1 pm here.[/quote]

Dear gawd.

[quote]anonym wrote:

[quote]Derek542 wrote:
:slight_smile: actually 1 pm here.[/quote]

Dear gawd.[/quote]

[quote]Derek542 wrote:

[quote]anonym wrote:

2pm
over 25 posts so far today
didn’t read

thumbsupbro.gif[/quote]

:slight_smile: actually 1 pm here. Still waiting on people to come back for physicals after lunch break.

Also watching workaholics on Netflix.

[/quote]

So how many rectum probing(s) do you have lined up this aft DJ? :wink:

[quote]DBCooper wrote:
One thing I’ve learned: even the smartest motherfuckers with an air of unmistakable infallibility about them are wrong some of the time and if you think that one of these people are wrong you should challenge them about it. It instills confidence in oneself and it also encourages people to think more critically and analytically about everything around them.
[/quote]

Don’t you have to be one of the people you’re challenging in order to challenge them?

[quote]Ct. Rockula wrote:
How long did it take you to learn these little gems?

Lol

[/quote]

Too long, and I can honestly say that’s the case for most people.

[quote]bond james bond wrote:

[quote]Derek542 wrote:

[quote]anonym wrote:

2pm
over 25 posts so far today
didn’t read

thumbsupbro.gif[/quote]

:slight_smile: actually 1 pm here. Still waiting on people to come back for physicals after lunch break.

Also watching workaholics on Netflix.

[/quote]

So how many rectum probing(s) do you have lined up this aft DJ? :wink:

[/quote]

Your work situation seems more like your managers exploiting you with the threat of demotion(or by ‘back bagging groceries’ were they actually implying they’d fire you so you’d have to go work at wal-mart or something?) than teaching you some valuable effort about WORKING YOUR HARDEST.

[quote]bond james bond wrote:

[quote]Derek542 wrote:

[quote]anonym wrote:

2pm
over 25 posts so far today
didn’t read

thumbsupbro.gif[/quote]

:slight_smile: actually 1 pm here. Still waiting on people to come back for physicals after lunch break.

Also watching workaholics on Netflix.

[/quote]

So how many rectum probing(s) do you have lined up this aft DJ? :wink:

[/quote]

Stop working family practice and ER years ago. So no dip sticking.

I do the physicals for construction so just hernia checks.

You know grabbing the twig and berries 20-30 times a day.

[quote]Derek542 wrote:
[/quote]

LMFAO!

[quote]red04 wrote:
Your work situation seems more like your managers exploiting you with the threat of demotion(or by ‘back bagging groceries’ were they actually implying they’d fire you so you’d have to go work at wal-mart or something?) than teaching you some valuable effort about WORKING YOUR HARDEST.[/quote]

I have worked in a grocery store since I was old enough to work. When I was 18 I switched into a much more difficult area of work inside that store. Since changing my work ethic, I now make significantly more than my coworkers doing the same job, and I get larger raises every six months.

It was worth it. I got a hefty raise, and higher scaling raises

[quote]zephead4747 wrote:

[quote]red04 wrote:
Your work situation seems more like your managers exploiting you with the threat of demotion(or by ‘back bagging groceries’ were they actually implying they’d fire you so you’d have to go work at wal-mart or something?) than teaching you some valuable effort about WORKING YOUR HARDEST.[/quote]

I have worked in a grocery store since I was old enough to work. When I was 18 I switched into a much more difficult area of work inside that store. Since changing my work ethic, I now make significantly more than my coworkers doing the same job, and I get larger raises every six months.

It was worth it. I got a hefty raise, and higher scaling raises[/quote]

I’m curious what do you do in the store now?

[quote]Johnny T Frisk wrote:

[quote]zephead4747 wrote:

[quote]red04 wrote:
Your work situation seems more like your managers exploiting you with the threat of demotion(or by ‘back bagging groceries’ were they actually implying they’d fire you so you’d have to go work at wal-mart or something?) than teaching you some valuable effort about WORKING YOUR HARDEST.[/quote]

I have worked in a grocery store since I was old enough to work. When I was 18 I switched into a much more difficult area of work inside that store. Since changing my work ethic, I now make significantly more than my coworkers doing the same job, and I get larger raises every six months.

It was worth it. I got a hefty raise, and higher scaling raises[/quote]

I’m curious what do you do in the store now?
[/quote]

Honestly, I do almost everything now. I’ve worked in every department except bakery, I work produce/cut fruit, deli, and meat department mostly right now. I spoke to my regional manager and he told me to try applying for a produce lead (assistant manager) when a job opens up close enough to where I go to school. I’m kind of waiting on that. He spoke to me about moving higher up after I finish college, but I’m not sure if I want to do that. It’s nice knowing I have some form of guarenteed employment when I graduate, but I dont think I want to spend a large chunk of my life being a store director.

I'm not worried about it, but I want to leave college with some kind of managerial experience.