T Nation

What is The Scapular Problem?

With foam rollong, thera-cane etc I have really fixed alot of soft tissue issues this year (hooray 2006)

http://captnj.blogspot.com/2006/12/now-what-if-i-cared-5-things-i-would.html

I have 1 remaining issue that isnt getting better, so any rehab guys can help me out?

Its not a painful thing but im pretty sure that something is wrong. I do keep decent posture so the shoulder blades are back and down. But when i fully retract and depress the left side shoulder blade seems to be like running over a bumpy road its as if my sub-scapularis has many lumps on it or something… any suggestions?

See if you can get them yanked out by an ART or other soft tissue specialist?

Have you tried rolling on a tennis ball? Give that a shot and see how you feel.

yes ive tried tennis ball. its actually the same thing. Perhaps to be more clear… the rough edge is BETWEEN my ribs and my shouder blade so its like on the inner side of the shoulder blade… thats why Im not sure how to target it!

[quote]CaptnJ wrote:
yes ive tried tennis ball. its actually the same thing. Perhaps to be more clear… the rough edge is BETWEEN my ribs and my shouder blade so its like on the inner side of the shoulder blade… thats why Im not sure how to target it![/quote]

are your arms in the “I dream of Jeannie” position or fingers locked behind your neck, elbows touching in front?

Just curious, did you use any books or guides with the thera-cane or did you just experiment?

Snapping scapula! That’s probably the condition you have. It may be painful or not and it may be quite annoying. It can be caused by bursitis, a soft tissue tumor, bony spurs on the scapula, muscle atrophy between the scapula and the ribs or by fibrosus tissue. If you don’t have any pain it’s not necessarily anything wrong. It has been reported that as many as 31 of 100 asymptomatic adults have this kind of scapulothoracic crepitus.

The normal treatment regardless of the cause (except the tumor of course) is conservative. Lots of work on serratus, subscapularis, the intrascapular muscles and so on. The good thing is that it seems to work well with heavy training for this condition!

Some good info can be found in:
Am J Sports Med. 2004 Sep;32(6):1554-65

/HiScore