T Nation

What is the Correct Prowler Weight?


#1

I am sure this has been posted before and common knowledge to many, but what is correct weight to load on prowler sled. Is it a certain percentage of bodyweight, percentage of squat...

Thanks


#2

However much you can push..

Not trying to be an ass either. Just load and push. Load it to your max and keep the distance short. Cut the weight and push it longer. Very customizable.


#3

You will have to use perceived. The surface you push or drag will effect how difficult it is to push.

If you are using it for recovery , you would use a very different weight
than for developing maximal strength.


#4

This article by Joe DeFranco talks about sets, distances, and rest between sets. Scroll down near the bottom where Joe talks about sled work. Keep in mind that Joe is focused on improving strength and sprint speed, so this workout is probably geared more towards that goal.

http://www.defrancostraining.com/articles.html

As for weight, I agree with the other guys. It all depends on your sled and surface. You'll just need to experiment. I drag a 150-some lbs. sled on grass and after 100 yards I am completely winded and desperate for a break.


#5

Depends on the surface.


#6

I would guess so your distance or number of reps is challenging while still explosive, the guys aren't grinding out at maximal effort in the videos


#7

thibs just said this in his other thread

"you can't compare eccentric-less sled work with regular lifting as far as how the contractions feel. You should feel a huge pump... so much that the pump, not lack of strength or fatigue will make the execution harder. "


#8

What cable/handles did you guys bought?


#9

substantial chains, possibly dogleads.
This time I have used strong dog toys for the handles.


#10

Bought 2 feet of 1.5'' PVC pipe and cut a couple of 6'' segments, run through some rope. And yes, this should probably scare those on my Christmas gift list this year.


#11

  1. Based on whatever time limitation you have aim to get to a specific numbers of completed sets. Could be 3, 5, 7 etc.

  2. Use a moderate rate, don't worry about going to heavy the first few times out. (I currently stick with 2 plates right now as the surface I sled on has a lot of resistance)

  3. After each workout assess how well your body has recovered. Do you feel fresh the morning after? At the end of the week are you worn out? If the answer is no, up the weight or the number of sets completed. I would stick with upping the sets before manipulating how much weight you have on the sled.

If the answer is no, reassess your nutrition, how much sleep you're getting each night and maybe look at decreasing number of sets or weight on the sled.

Once you've reached your target amount of sets you can start to progressively increase the weight weekly over time. For Lower body Sledding I would think 20-30 lbs increments would be doable. For Upper body Sledding 10-20 should be just about right.

There are an infinite amount of ways to assess how much weight to use this is just an example of what I'm doing.

Good Luck!

If you need anymore help feel free to PM me.


Ps. Here is a copy and paste of CT's original article

The Simple Rule for Adding Volume

The simple rule is to use metabolic fatigue as a guideline, and never train to the point where you feel like you have nothing left in the tank, energy-wise.

Here's a good test: 15 minutes after your last set of eccentric-less training for legs, you should feel like you want to do more. I'm not suggesting you actually do more; just take note of how you feel, and use that as a gauge to determine when you've overdone it.


#12

Reviving an old thread but... what do you think a prowler weighs? I understand that each may be different from different manufacturers. I have access to a T-Nation one. I can load it with 135lbs of plates but was wondering how much I am really doing considering the weight of the prowler ( yoke and all)

Thanks!


#13

another interesting apparatus i never tried