T Nation

What is Strong for Over 50's?

How do you define a strong guy that is over 50? Bench press 1 1/2 times body weight? Deadlift 2x body weight? Just looking for some feedback for the “older” guys to strive for. And. of course, feel free to chime in for the 40 year old’s also.

O-50: Harry

O-40: Pete

www.rawpowerlifting.com/classifications.htm

my current training partner is 54, a retired state police officer, stays around 10% body fat (guy has veins showing in his abds) 5’11" 220-230lbs, can routinely do 315 for reps on flat bench, 275 for reps on inline, 275lbs for reps on flat close grip bench, do db rows with he 200lbers, guy looks great and the strongest non competitor for his age I know.

[quote]kpsnap wrote:
www.rawpowerlifting.com/classifications.htm[/quote]

That list is pretty much for anyone over 25 yrs of age. No adjustment for age, so I’ve wondered how does this relate?

Comparing lifts to current rankings on PL watch is another way to see where you are in comparrison to others your age and weight.

I’ve come to the conclusion that by the time your in your 40’s and 50’s you have suffered some kind of injury or set back. If your still digging and finding ways to work around injuries, and if you have not quit, and retired to the couch…you are strong!

Good question. Relative to your years of training,type of focus and goals during your training,previous PR’s and other limitations (previously mentioned injuries)it would of course vary.
As suggested there are some real strong over 50 lifters on this forum who compete and there training gives you a good idea of what is possible.

My guy/training partner will be 54 next month. He’s 5’3" and weighs around 165. We typically compete equipped but his current raw lifts are:

Squat: 390
Bench: 305
Deadlift: 420

You are right that age brings injuries. However, often those people training long enough to be dogged by injuries have been training a long time and are just generally stronger because of the longevity of their training. I’m not sure if that makes sense.

Before long I’ll be able to give you feed back on how the 50+ women are faring as well.

[quote]kpsnap wrote:
www.rawpowerlifting.com/classifications.htm[/quote]

I love this chart. You may have missed that class III description says this is a common category for over strong 50 lifters.

Class II, I’m coming for you!

[quote]arachne12 wrote:

[quote]kpsnap wrote:
www.rawpowerlifting.com/classifications.htm[/quote]

I love this chart. You may have missed that class III description says this is a common category for over strong 50 lifters.

Class II, I’m coming for you!
[/quote]

Have looked at this chart a dozen times, and never saw that.
Hanging in there between class I and master

One male training partner, 50, 900+ squat, 550 bench, upper 600s DL.

Female training partner, 50, upper 400s squat, upper 200s bench, 500 DL.

regarding the rawpowerlifting classifications, interesting. not sure if I agree or not.

It’s been said before but you can’t compare yourself to other people. I’m in my mid-40s (a young mid-40s thankyouverymuch) and am nowhere near as strong as the folks that Pete mention. But I’ve only been doing this for maybe 5 years so I shouldn’t expect to be that strong. But, if I look at where I was when I started then I’m leaps and bounds away from that.

What about someone who is strong in the lifts that aren’t necessarily one of the powerlifting lifts? Snap has the standards but what about someone who is a great overhead presser? What about someone who is really strong with the Atlas stones? Or towing a truck?

There’s a lot of ways to be physically strong and there’s a lot of variables that go into all of this. Sorry for the overly long post.

james

Without sounding too much like a moron I would think that the idea of strong varies from person to person regardless of age. When I am 50 (in a few short years) I fully expect to be stronger than I am today, however if I didn’t start lifting until I was 50 my goals and expectations would be much different. Honestly I think anyone trying to be/get/stay strong at 50 is probably strong enough mentally to eventually get the corresponding results physically.

If you lifted more this week than last, that’s strong. Don’t judge yourself by others, beat the log book each week, do the best you can and you’ll be strong.