T Nation

What Happens To Sumo Wrestlers?


#1

What do you think happens to sumo wreslters after their "glory" days are over? You never hear what happens to them, do they even live to be old? Do they get into some type of fetish porn? Does anybody know??


#2

Konishiki does television shows I think, but he's still a fat fuck. Akebono is busy embarassing himself as a wrestler/mma fighter. Takanohana runs a sumo training stable. Wakanohana is also doing television, and I believe tried to play pro football. I have no idea what Mushashimaru is up to.

So basically they stay big, some try to keep fighting or doing other sports, they all wind up doing cheesy Japanese television, and, they'll all probably die young. I don't know what happens to the lesser fighters. Some probably wind up working at their old stables I would imagine.


#3

You know, thats a very good question...

Coaching perhaps?

Google it.


#4

I wish Sumo was more popular in the Mainland US.

I used to watch it on the Japanese Chanel out of Honolulu, It was very popular when Akebono and Musahimaru and Konsihki were tearing it up.


#5

They become bulimic and cause tsunamis along the Pacific Ring of Fire.


#6

My understanding was that many actually lost much of their competition weight after they retired.


#7

Sounds like we have a HOT-ROX challenge comming up!


#8

Is there one?


#9

We should have a T-Nation "resemblance to a sumo" contest.


#10

In Japan. Sumo is a little better than Curling in terms of international appeal.


#11

That's absolute B.S. I see sumo wrestling on T.V almost every other day it seems. And in the states, I had never even heard of curling before this most recent winter olympics.

Additionally, famous sumos land extremely lucritive advertising contracts here, and often get the opportunity to fight in exibition K-1 or Pride matchs. Though, I've never seen one do well in a MMA match...


#12

Sumos are like any other ex-athlete. If they were famous before they retired they can land TV show gigs and advertising contracts. If not, they go off into obscurity or get a real job. (I've got an ex-sumo buddy who owns a Brazilian steakhouse in Ikebukuro). Lots also open their own 'beya' (like a dojo) and take on students.

While some sumos do continue to eat like a sumo after they retire, and die at a pretty young age. A good portion of them actually seem to drop most of their fat and manage to look relatively normal. (They actually have alot of muscle under all that fat). And then others get into the schoolgirl/dirty panty vending machine porn industry and whore themselves out... just kidding, NO ONE wants to see that.


#13

I did amateur sumo for a few years so I know a bit about the sport.

Most professional sumo wrestlers die young. The average life expectancy for a sumo wrestler is 60, and when you consider that Japanese have the world's longest life expectancy, that's not much.

Some get into TV announcing or become what the Japanese call 'talento' which means they appear on variety shows and quiz shows over here in Nippon.

Many become oyakata, or stable masters. There is a set number of oyakata though, and you have to pay to become one.

Some of the less successful sumo wrestlers become cooks after they retire, as all young sumo wrestlers learn how to cook while they are in the stable.

A very few have become professional wrestlers. Usually they were guys who squandered their fortunes through gambling, etc and have to do this to survive. It is seen as disrespectful to sumo. Akebono's feeble attempts in both MMA and pro wrestling have tarnished his legacy for sure.

I've never heard of any doing fetish porn or anything like that but to do so would mean that person would be totally excommunicated from the humble and dignified world of sumo.


#14

Would there be a female categorie? Lol!
You know, for those who like big girls...


#15

To echo what others have said, I've read that many sumo wrestlers develop diabetes and die quite young.

I kind of look at sumo wrestling the same as bodybuilding. It's absolutely fascinating to observe from the outside looking in. But I just can't imagine actually participating and giving my life over to something that you know, if you want to be the least bit competitive and make any money at it, you're going to have to accept the fact that your knocking a decade or two (heck, maybe even three) off of your life expectancy. I'm just amazed that people can do that and not seem to be bothered by it.


#16

Some go on to have their own stables. Thinking about it, many don't seem to have made it to old age.
Quite a few open restaurants. Become tv personalites, sumo commentators. That's about it I think.


#17

I always liked Chad Rowan/Akebono.

I hope he is participating in MMA and Pr-Wrestling because he loves the sports. Hawaiians love Pro-Wrestling and MMA.

If he is simply whoring himself for the money it's really sad.


#18

Bro,

Rowan has been in several MMA fights here and I think he has not won a bout yet. He actually got into some trouble here because a group of them were having informal bouts at some gym. He claims he was there, but did not participate. I think the gym ended up closing. Not sure about this.

I used to live in Sapporo in Northern Japan. I know there was a very famous restraunt owned by a former sumo wrestler. I was told by my Japanese friends that this was not uncommon.

Derick


#19

I know a guy who works alot of corners for fighters, in several mma productions. He said to me that Akebono doesn't really train hard. That Akebono just says "I'm Yokozuna" as reason not to train hard or listen to his coaches.
So maybe it is about the money. Foreigners don't get chances to open stables so maybe he does need the money.


#20

Apparently he needs the money. Somehow he has lost the fortune he earned in sumo.