T Nation

What Happens on a Huge Carb Day?

Say my normal carb intake is around 170g at 190 body weight.

What would happen if I spiked to say, 30 beers worth + the regular 170ish?

Just curious if I would experience any weird feeling or sickness aside from the regular heavy drinking symptoms?

Let’s say you ate lots of potatoes and rice instead of beers, just to make the point without the effects of alcohol.

You would refill glycogen stores, possibly have a little more energy for a little while. If you spread them out you would be fine, if you ate them all at the same time you would crash.

Nothing would happen.

Contrary to popular opinion, most complex carbs aren’t as “fattening” as you would like to believe. They may cause an insulin release (if you chose shitty an unprocessed carbs in very large amounts, ie the average American), meaning you sure as hell aren’t going to be losing fat. Nevertheless, you’d be suprised about the body’s natural gylcogen reserves-- the brain uses about 100g carbs a day to simply function!

Nevertheless, the take home message is that most of the carbs will go to fill up reserves, which in your case (at that carb level) are probably relatively empty. Also remember that complex (ie non sugar), carbs are very thermic-- and require a great deal of energy to break down. The main problem with high carb diets is that in the presence of high fat levels, they really pack on the pounds. Because of the of elevated insulin, fat unfortunately also gets “shuttled” into adipose tissue, not muscle or liver glycogen. This is why high starch diets are great for building muscle (a happy muscle is a full one) but also terrible for those who do not watch fat intake (dirty bulk).

We will assume carb intake is not from alcohol, I will touch on that one in a bit. The carbs would be broken down into simple sugars by the body and absorbed into the blood stream through the small intestine where it enters the blood raising blood glucose levels. Insulin is released to store this glucose to avoid hyperglycemia.

Once the muscle and glycogen stores are full, insulin still must clear the excess glucose from the blood. At this time the excess carbs are shuttled to adipose tissue where our metabolism converts them to triglycerides(fat) to be stored.

Also, if the insulin spike is triggered very rapidly by high glycemic index carbs like a large quantity of sugar there may be a rebound effect where insulin will rapidly lower glood glucose levels(crashing). This can lead to a state of hypoglycemia(low blood sugar) which can trigger appetite.

Now if it is beer. Most of the calories in a beer do not come from the carbs, but the alcohol itself. Each gram of pure alcohol(Etoh) contains 7 calories. Most beers contain about a “serving of alcohol”, so 14 grams. So with the couple of carbs that are in the beer, we will figure about 100kcals a beer.

The alcohol hits our systems and is rapidly absorbed through most tissues directly into our blood. Once in our blood alcohol receives VIP treatment right to the liver. The energy released from the alcohol is used first leaving the glucose and fats to circulate. Any excess glucose or fat that is circulating in our blood is converted directly to fat.

The result of your 30 beers plus normal food is this, 30x100 = 3,000 kcals = just under a lb of fat. You can pack on nearly a lb of fat, damage your liver, displace healthy foods, all while doing something or someone that you probably didn’t want to do.

[quote]hexx wrote:
Contrary to popular opinion, most complex carbs aren’t as “fattening” as you would like to believe. They may cause an insulin release (if you chose shitty an unprocessed carbs in very large amounts, ie the average American), meaning you sure as hell aren’t going to be losing fat. Nevertheless, you’d be suprised about the body’s natural gylcogen reserves-- the brain uses about 100g carbs a day to simply function!

Nevertheless, the take home message is that most of the carbs will go to fill up reserves, which in your case (at that carb level) are probably relatively empty. Also remember that complex (ie non sugar), carbs are very thermic-- and require a great deal of energy to break down. The main problem with high carb diets is that in the presence of high fat levels, they really pack on the pounds. Because of the of elevated insulin, fat unfortunately also gets “shuttled” into adipose tissue, not muscle or liver glycogen. This is why high starch diets are great for building muscle (a happy muscle is a full one) but also terrible for those who do not watch fat intake (dirty bulk).
[/quote]

I’m curious as to where you got your information. I’m not trying to disrespect you, just some info that I’d be interested in myself.

Kelly Baggett’s No Bull Muscle, featured on this site a few months ago. Excellent read, well worth the price. Really put things into perspective for me. I’d actually post his exact words but im home from college and the ebook’s on my lappy.

It’s also important to note that your liver is basically “tied up” trying to get rid of all that hooch before ti can turn towards normal metabolic work, so you’re really hamstringing your fat-loss and muscle building efforts with your boozery.

30 really?? Huh, don’t know if that’s a problem or a gift.

I’d say gift :). Decided to ask this right before St. Patrick’s day, didn’t ya.