What Do You Think of My Program?

[quote]KBCThird wrote:
blazindave wrote:
KBCThird wrote:
You’re going to go into the gym 6 days/week no matter what I say, because i can see that’s what you want to do, but I will say dont be afraid to back off of a day or two (or three) if you feel it would be beneficial

Wrong. I just make sure to take everything with a grain of salt. Alot of people are self proclaimed this and that. I just want reasoning behind why i should change something. Saying “it sucks, do this instead” doesnt make me any smarter or make me understand why.

I think this is funny because in the very next paragraph you provide a scenario wherein you do rippetoe’s program and THEN add in your other stuff to do to bring it to a total of 6 days/week in the gym. But I guess I’m wrong :slight_smile:

If me saying that you’re gonna do what you’re gonna do came across as an insult, I didnt mean it like that. Just that people in general do what they want, and I can see this is an idea you have in your head. I take you at your word that if I said “no absolutely not, 4 days/week max” you’d do it. But if anyone told you you’d kill yourself at more than 4 days they’d be lying, or thinking of something that I dont know about.

Plenty of very successful athletes spent a tone of time in the gym and somehow managed to avoid the overtraining bogey man. Not just bodybuilders like Ronnie and Arnold, but mma athletes like Forrest Griffin, and take your pick from the team sports in teh us, plenty of workaholics to choose from. So I like the rippetoe/bodyweight stuff. give it a try.

I did. I like his plan. Or what i saw anyway. Are there any other training plans out there that are worth a look. I’m in it for the CNS and strength, not the look.
Thanks, you re being very helpful :smiley:

TONS of other training plans. One could argue that there are no bad plans, only poor applications of it. If you are in this for the long haul spend the $30 and buy “The Strength Coach’s Training Playbook” by Joe Kenn on Elitefts. That goes for everyone else reading this thread. I’ve recommended this book more times than you can shake a stick at. I havent used the straight program in that book in years, but theres a very specific reason for that. Nevertheless, his writing, and the principles he has culled for a variety of sources, have been enormously influential on my thinking with regards to training.

One piece of advice sounds very basic, but you would be stunned how often people forget this: always remember that you are a triathlete. Your first, last and only goal should be to improve your times. If your times (or distances, or whatever youre training at the moment) are improving, then stay the course with your work in the weight room. Do not fall into the trap of looking for the “perfect” program. Good enough is good enough and a little tinker here and a tinker there and soon youre doing a differnt prgram every week, with no way to gauge progress. You had better have a DARN good reason to change ANYTHING once you start.

On the other hand, if your times arent improving (or recovery from the running, biking swimming isnt improving) dont be afraid to cut back on teh weight stuff. Cut out what and put what in it’s place? I dont know and I doubt anyone else on here does either, because we’ve never trained weights while training for a triathlon. I’m willing to bet you’ll have to do a lot of figuring out on your own, but that’s not such a bad thing.
[/quote]

Well…The thing is, triathlon training has nothing to do with being in the gym. You go outside. Does that count :stuck_out_tongue: It’s actually the opposite of strength training. Endurance/cardio training is high volume, low intensity. I would figure the different “systems” (aerobic versus anaerobic, myofibrilar dominant versus sarcoplasmic dominant) wouldnt cause one to really affect the other. Is my thinking off?

Or, if i do my cardio/triathlon training the same day as the strength program, would that be alright?
Would that actually be better? Cause if i absolutely need rest days like rippetoe says, then im willing to go that route.
It’s obvious that there is no perfect plan, but im just trying to mix in some strength for my karate and still continue the triathlon stuff.
I’m just looking for a plan that will get me stronger, more CNS strengthening and progress for triathlon and karate. I’m looking for a “good enough” that i can do for years and all i need to basically worry about is upping the weight.
Please advise :stuck_out_tongue:
And thanks.

[quote]lordstorm88 wrote:
stimulating the CNS and increasing muscle, like i said and others said you should do rippetoe’s for a start, and then increase sets, reduce reps. meanwhile the best approach would be to eat until you reach your goal weight. after you do and have cut down you should be eating at maintenance.

if you eat at maintenance you wont gain any more muscle, though the muscle may “turn into” fat or the other way around. that highly depends on your diet and your training of you as an individual.

meanwhile your CNS though will continue to be stimulated and you’ll get stronger[/quote]

I don’t know how to do this. I do not have a goal weight. I’m pretty much as thin as a stick (in a healthy way). Weight is not an issue for me.

[quote]blazindave wrote:
KBCThird wrote:

One piece of advice sounds very basic, but you would be stunned how often people forget this: always remember that you are a triathlete. Your first, last and only goal should be to improve your times. If your times (or distances, or whatever youre training at the moment) are improving, then stay the course with your work in the weight room. Do not fall into the trap of looking for the “perfect” program. Good enough is good enough and a little tinker here and a tinker there and soon youre doing a differnt prgram every week, with no way to gauge progress. You had better have a DARN good reason to change ANYTHING once you start.

On the other hand, if your times arent improving (or recovery from the running, biking swimming isnt improving) dont be afraid to cut back on teh weight stuff. Cut out what and put what in it’s place? I dont know and I doubt anyone else on here does either, because we’ve never trained weights while training for a triathlon. I’m willing to bet you’ll have to do a lot of figuring out on your own, but that’s not such a bad thing.

Well…The thing is, triathlon training has nothing to do with being in the gym. You go outside. Does that count :stuck_out_tongue: It’s actually the opposite of strength training. Endurance/cardio training is high volume, low intensity. I would figure the different “systems” (aerobic versus anaerobic, myofibrilar dominant versus sarcoplasmic dominant) wouldnt cause one to really affect the other. Is my thinking off?[/quote]

I do think that thinking is off, yes, and here’s why. If you were to run a marathon one day and walk into the weightroom the next day and bench, would you expect a new 1RM? Of course not. Your body is fatigued overall, even if the specific muscles being worked are not; it is difficult, if not impossible to divide the stresses on the body into neat little compartments. That stuff may work in theory, but you’ll find that somethign as innocuous as getting a lot of sun may sap your energy. Stress comes at the body from all angles.

So I would say it’s completely possible that it may go the other way. I think it’s perfectly possible for an athlete to squat in season for almost the exact reasons you cite above, and that I mentioned (thousands of plyos vs. a few dozen heavy reps) BUT you cannot serve two masters. Something always has to give to the other, you cant put the pedal to the metal on both. On the other hand, you’re new to the weightroom so you will gain on the squat for a while, even while keeping your triathlon training as the priority.

[quote]Or, if i do my cardio/triathlon training the same day as the strength program, would that be alright?
Would that actually be better? Cause if i absolutely need rest days like rippetoe says, then im willing to go that route.
It’s obvious that there is no perfect plan, but im just trying to mix in some strength for my karate and still continue the triathlon stuff.[/quote]

That would be fine. Would it be better? [shrug] give it a shot. Some people prefer to have some days where they dont have to do anything, some people prefer spreading it out so that they never have 2 workouts in one day. If you do double up the workouts tho, put the triathlon stuff first so teh fatigue from weight training doesnt affect it

[quote]I’m just looking for a plan that will get me stronger, more CNS strengthening and progress for triathlon and karate. I’m looking for a “good enough” that i can do for years and all i need to basically worry about is upping the weight.
Please advise :stuck_out_tongue:
And thanks.[/quote]

This is fine to look for, but i wouldnt expect to find it, certainly not right away. Louie Simmons of Westside Barbell is often credited with teh quote “everything works. nothing works forever” in regards to programs. I’d be very very surprised if you found a program that you never ever have to tweak for one reason or another

[quote]KBCThird wrote:
blazindave wrote:
KBCThird wrote:

One piece of advice sounds very basic, but you would be stunned how often people forget this: always remember that you are a triathlete. Your first, last and only goal should be to improve your times. If your times (or distances, or whatever youre training at the moment) are improving, then stay the course with your work in the weight room. Do not fall into the trap of looking for the “perfect” program. Good enough is good enough and a little tinker here and a tinker there and soon youre doing a differnt prgram every week, with no way to gauge progress. You had better have a DARN good reason to change ANYTHING once you start.

On the other hand, if your times arent improving (or recovery from the running, biking swimming isnt improving) dont be afraid to cut back on teh weight stuff. Cut out what and put what in it’s place? I dont know and I doubt anyone else on here does either, because we’ve never trained weights while training for a triathlon. I’m willing to bet you’ll have to do a lot of figuring out on your own, but that’s not such a bad thing.

Well…The thing is, triathlon training has nothing to do with being in the gym. You go outside. Does that count :stuck_out_tongue: It’s actually the opposite of strength training. Endurance/cardio training is high volume, low intensity. I would figure the different “systems” (aerobic versus anaerobic, myofibrilar dominant versus sarcoplasmic dominant) wouldnt cause one to really affect the other. Is my thinking off?

I do think that thinking is off, yes, and here’s why. If you were to run a marathon one day and walk into the weightroom the next day and bench, would you expect a new 1RM? Of course not. Your body is fatigued overall, even if the specific muscles being worked are not; it is difficult, if not impossible to divide the stresses on the body into neat little compartments. That stuff may work in theory, but you’ll find that somethign as innocuous as getting a lot of sun may sap your energy. Stress comes at the body from all angles.

So I would say it’s completely possible that it may go the other way. I think it’s perfectly possible for an athlete to squat in season for almost the exact reasons you cite above, and that I mentioned (thousands of plyos vs. a few dozen heavy reps) BUT you cannot serve two masters. Something always has to give to the other, you cant put the pedal to the metal on both. On the other hand, you’re new to the weightroom so you will gain on the squat for a while, even while keeping your triathlon training as the priority.

Or, if i do my cardio/triathlon training the same day as the strength program, would that be alright?
Would that actually be better? Cause if i absolutely need rest days like rippetoe says, then im willing to go that route.
It’s obvious that there is no perfect plan, but im just trying to mix in some strength for my karate and still continue the triathlon stuff.

That would be fine. Would it be better? [shrug] give it a shot. Some people prefer to have some days where they dont have to do anything, some people prefer spreading it out so that they never have 2 workouts in one day. If you do double up the workouts tho, put the triathlon stuff first so teh fatigue from weight training doesnt affect it

I’m just looking for a plan that will get me stronger, more CNS strengthening and progress for triathlon and karate. I’m looking for a “good enough” that i can do for years and all i need to basically worry about is upping the weight.
Please advise :stuck_out_tongue:
And thanks.

This is fine to look for, but i wouldnt expect to find it, certainly not right away. Louie Simmons of Westside Barbell is often credited with teh quote “everything works. nothing works forever” in regards to programs. I’d be very very surprised if you found a program that you never ever have to tweak for one reason or another[/quote]

Alright.
This works.
This is why i was so pissed before, i wanted answers like this ^

Regardless, thanks to everyone for their input :smiley:

Thanks guys.