T Nation

What Can Hypermia Do for You?

Here is what Milos believes and the logic behind his workout supplementation the take home is that your pre/during/ and post workout supplementation all play a vital role in your progress.

Forget about the latest prohormone or NO product. Give your body what it needs in the amount it needs and at the times it needs and you will reep the rewards. I hope you enjoy and again the credit goes to Milos “The Mind” Sarcev for presenting this novel consept…enjoy:

Average male has 5 liters of blood (females have about 4)…At rest that blood is distributed throughout the body and follows certain path - normally supplying the body with physiological order of importance (what is needed the most is being on higher list of physiological priorities)…and simply organs and other tissues take preferance over the skeletal muscle AT REST…

So, when body is NOT physical (when we are resting) about 12-18% of total blood goes to our muscles and the rest is distributed ELSEWHERE (as I said - according to physiological importance at that moment)…
Also, note that this 5 liters of blood are circulating quite slowly…

Well, when we start being more physically active…we start “moving” and using our “motors” ( read: MUSCLES) - our hearts start pumping a bit faster and as a result - blood start circulating that much faster and somewhat different…No longer certain organs, systems or tissues prevail in “need for blood” internal physiological war body is having on a daily bases…

Now body faces extreme shock - WEIGHT RESISTANCE TRAINING and should I say: INTENSE KIND of weight training only BODYBUILDING could create…and as a result OUR MUSCLES start winning the war and getting high on the list of “physiological importance for blood” list…

More and more blood follow the path to OUR MUSCLES!! Each muscle contraction, every rep, every set and every exercise increases the need for blood…Higher the intensity - higher the blood flow…

NEW PHYSIOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE is certainly our muscles and soon we have MAJOR BLOOD FLOW into the area of our body which is engaged the most = OUR MUSCLES!!!

Well, as science has discovered HYPEREMIA (INCREASED BLOOD FLOW TO THE PART OF THE BODY…in this instance OUR MUSCLES) reaches incredible 80% blood flow to the muscle with up to 20 times faster circulation!!!

PLEASE PEOPLE - FOCUS ON THIS!!!

If you want to deliver something to your muscles WHEN DO YOU THINK IS THE BEST TIME?

Before training when only 15 % of the blood is in the muscle?
After the training when blood is leaving your muscles…or MAYBE ()

DURING THE TRAINING - when up to 80% of the BLOOD is…where…

Oh - IN EXACT MUSCLE YOU ARE TRYING TO BUILD and doing all your heavy lifting for…day after day, week after week…month after month…should i even say - year after year…or for some even decade after decade - with MEDIOCRE results at best!

So, don’t you think that IF YOU UNDERSTAND WHAT YOU COULD POSSIBLY ACCOMPLISH when you have 80% of your blood in exact muscles you are trying to build and YOU ACT UPON IT - you would possibly IMPROVE like never before (or like all the athletes I am preparing who keep shocking the world with FAST IMPROVEMENTS)?

If you PREPARE your blood correctly (sound diet plan in general + 30 minutes BEFORE training knowing WHICH NUTRIENTS TO TAKE that will in synergy with YOUR WORKOUT DRINK insure that YOUR BLOOD IS ANABOLIC/ANTI-CATABOLIC BOMB - filled with maximal amount of anabolic and anti-catabolic nutrients as well as TIMELY RELEASED anabolic and anti-catabolic hormones…What do you think WILL HAPPEN?

Especially IF YOU TRAIN in this GIANT SETS FASHION where you fly from one exercise to the next, changing numerous training variables, performing mixture of lifts, using various grips, angles, tempo…repetition protocols, speeds…etc?

Well, you guessed it - YOU GET MR. OLYMPIA IN A MAKING…

I will only say this once: DON’T SEND EMPTY BLOOD TO YOUR MUSCLES AT WORK…YOU ARE WASTING YOUR TIME!!!

Would you want to send FED-EX, Airmail envelope to someone as the best and fastest way of ‘sending’ the envelope?

Well, PLEASE - do not send EMPTY ENVELOPE - you are paying HIGH PRICE for: NOTHING!!!

Make sure you stuff the envelope…and at the same time understand that IF YOU ARE SENDING EMPTY BLOOD to the muscle (your best friend who is anxiously awaiting to OPEN your gift envelope) - you are doing the same thing!

good post.

So I assume that Milos recommends megadosing BCAAs ala Poliquin?

Both believe in megadosing BCAA’s (and hopefully this helps to explain why) but there is more to the protocol than just that. BCAA’s are an important part of the equation but think about all the things being broken down when you work out and what you need to replenish afterwards.

What has been perfecting is a sort of advanced nutrtient timing protocol. Milos asserts that by giving your body what it needs when it needs it you can use your workout as a time to build up instead of a time when we have been taught the muscle breaks down. He has a system in place he uses with his guys and has got some pretty impressive results with it but by his own admission it is a work in progress which he continues to refine. Food for thought…and I guess growth too:-)

.

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[quote]laroyal wrote:
Both believe in megadosing BCAA’s (and hopefully this helps to explain why) but there is more to the protocol than just that. BCAA’s are an important part of the equation but think about all the things being broken down when you work out and what you need to replenish afterwards.

What has been perfecting is a sort of advanced nutrtient timing protocol. Milos asserts that by giving your body what it needs when it needs it you can use your workout as a time to build up instead of a time when we have been taught the muscle breaks down. He has a system in place he uses with his guys and has got some pretty impressive results with it but by his own admission it is a work in progress which he continues to refine. Food for thought…and I guess growth too:-)[/quote]

What kind of sup can we add to BCAA for better work on hyperemia? I supose it depends of diet type too.

Thanks

BCAAs cause an insulin response correct?

Would this hypermia theory and/or BCAA megadosing in general be applicable to someone on a low-carb diet, especially if that person is trying to redevelop insulin sensitivity?

Someone with insulin resistance who has just eaten a carb-loaded meal will have to put out high levels of insulin to clear the sugar from the blood stream. It is that high insulin level over an extended time, and inability to quickly normalize blood sugar levels that causes a lot of health problems.

I don’t understand how BCAAs cause an insulin response but it would seem that they would not need to be cleared from the blood stream like sugar. My understanding is that the BCAA insulin spike is brief, and it doesn’t seem like the level of insulin would need to be anywhere near as high as it would for sugar. Does the insulin not have to bond with any receptors, or perhaps different receptors?

It seems, from my current level of knowledge, that the insulin spike from BCAAs would not be high enough nor lengthy enough to pose the same problems to an insulin resistant person as carbs would, and thus it would not derail someone’s journey back to health.

Am I thinking this through correctly?

You are thinking correctly. A certain insulin response is necessasary even on a low carb diet in order to store nutrients. The thing is you want to have optimized sensitivity and targeted allocation of nutrients.

Much of the insulin response from branch cains can be attributed to leucine and researchers found that by adding it into Pro+CHO supplementation it greatly increased protein synthesis for up to 6 hours with no adverse effects on insulin sensitivity (arguably the opposite effect).

[quote]laroyal wrote:
You are thinking correctly. A certain insulin response is necessasary even on a low carb diet in order to store nutrients. The thing is you want to have optimized sensitivity and targeted allocation of nutrients.

Much of the insulin response from branch cains can be attributed to leucine and researchers found that by adding it into Pro+CHO supplementation it greatly increased protein synthesis for up to 6 hours with no adverse effects on insulin sensitivity (arguably the opposite effect).[/quote]

Thanks for reassuring me on that.

I have been taking around 2.3 g of BCAAs in addition to the BCAAs in my whey isolate shake post workout, but taking this into consideration it sounds like I would not be hurting myself by taking a dose with my pre-workout shake too.

[quote]Moon Knight wrote:
laroyal wrote:
You are thinking correctly. A certain insulin response is necessasary even on a low carb diet in order to store nutrients. The thing is you want to have optimized sensitivity and targeted allocation of nutrients. Much of the insulin response from branch cains can be attributed to leucine and researchers found that by adding it into Pro+CHO supplementation it greatly increased protein synthesis for up to 6 hours with no adverse effects on insulin sensitivity (arguably the opposite effect).

Thanks for reassuring me on that.

I have been taking around 2.3 g of BCAAs in addition to the BCAAs in my whey isolate shake post workout, but taking this into consideration it sounds like I would not be hurting myself by taking a dose with my pre-workout shake too.
[/quote]

That would be fine. Here is a summary of a study on leucine by Jose Antonio that elaborates a bit more. IMO your BCAA dose may be a bit low.

By Jose Antonio, Ph.D.

Here is a question - which of the following macronutrients is �??essential�?? in the human diet?

Your choices are:
A. Carbohydrate
B. Protein
C. Fat
D. All of the above
E. Two of the above

Note: the word �??essential�?? as it refers to our diet means that we need to consume that food or nutrient because our bodies do not make that nutrient naturally. Hence, it is �??essential�?? we get it in our diets.

Did you figure out the answer?

The Answer is�?�E.

Yes, that�??s right. Only two of the three are essential. They are protein (with amino acids as the building blocks) and fat (i.e. the essential fatty acids).

The Need for Protein

In the protein category, there are amino acids that are unique in their own right. They�??re the branched-chain amino acids (valine, leucine, and isoleucine). Of the three, BCAA leucine is very important. Here�??s why.

A recent study looked at the effects of dietary leucine supplementation on the exercise performance of outrigger canoeists. Thirteen (10 female, three male) competitive outrigger canoeists underwent testing before and after six-week supplementation with either capsulated L-leucine (45 mg/kg.d, which is equal to 3.15 grams of leucine for a 154 lb individual) or placebo (corn flour). Testing included anthropometry, 10-second upper-body power and work and a row to exhaustion at 70-75% maximal aerobic power where perceived exertion (RPE), heart rate (HR) and plasma BCAA and tryptophan concentrations were assessed.

What happened?

Leucine supplementation resulted in significant increases in plasma leucine and total BCAA concentrations. Upper body power and work significantly increased in both groups after supplementation but power was significantly greater after leucine supplementation compared to the placebo.

Rowing time significantly increased and average RPE significantly decreased with leucine supplementation while these variables were unchanged with the placebo. Leucine supplementation had no effect on the plasma tryptophan to BCAA ratio, HR or anthropometric variables. Six weeks’ dietary leucine supplementation significantly improved endurance performance and upper body power in outrigger canoeists.[1] As an amateur outrigger canoeist myself, I can testify to the benefits of the essential aminos, especially leucine!

During exercise, muscle protein synthesis decreases together with a net increase in protein degradation and stimulation of BCAA oxidation (the BCAAs are of course leucine, valine and isoleucine). The decrease in protein synthesis is associated with inhibition of translation initiation factors 4E and 4G and ribosomal protein S6 which are under regulatory controls of intracellular insulin signaling and leucine concentrations. In essence, both insulin and leucine are key regulators in muscle protein synthesis![2]

Another interesting tidbit is that leucine by itself increases muscle protein synthesis.[3] By combing leucine with protein and carbohydrate, you get quite the anabolic super-effect.

For example, in one study eight male subjects were randomly assigned to three trials in which they consumed drinks containing either carbohydrate (CHO), carbohydrate and protein (CHO+PRO), or carbohydrate, protein, and free leucine (CHO+PRO+Leu) following 45 min of resistance exercise. They discovered that plasma insulin response was higher in the CHO+PRO+Leu compared with the CHO and CHO+PRO trials. Whole body protein breakdown rates were lower, and whole body protein synthesis rates were higher, in the CHO+PRO and CHO+PRO+Leu trials compared with the CHO trial; moreover, the addition of leucine in the CHO+PRO+Leu trial resulted in a lower protein oxidation rate compared with the CHO+PRO trial.

And to top it off, muscle protein synthesis, measured over a 6-h period of post-exercise recovery, was significantly greater in the CHO+PRO+Leu trial compared with the CHO trial with intermediate values observed in the CHO+PRO trial.[4]

Leucine. It does the body good.

References

Crowe, M.J., J.N. Weatherson, and B.F. Bowden, Effects of dietary leucine supplementation on exercise performance. Eur J Appl Physiol, 2005: p. 1-9.
Norton, L.E. and D.K. Layman, Leucine regulates translation initiation of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle after exercise. J Nutr, 2006. 136(2): p. 533S-537S.
Lang, C.H., Elevated Plasma Free Fatty Acids Decrease Basal Protein Synthesis but Not the Anabolic Effect of Leucine in Skeletal Muscle. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab, 2006.
Koopman, R., et al., Combined ingestion of protein and free leucine with carbohydrate increases post-exercise muscle protein synthesis in vivo in male subjects. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab, 2005. 288(4): p. E645-53.

Laroyal, what’s your take on dosing leucine between meals? It’s an idea I’ve heard kicked around.

[quote]Freaky Styley wrote:
Laroyal, what’s your take on dosing leucine between meals? It’s an idea I’ve heard kicked around.[/quote]

From the research I have come across it looks like the best times to take it would be 4G pre and post w/o and at night if you wake up and morning when you wake. I would simply add it to your post workout shake and mix some to sip at night or when you wake up.

www.fitflex.com/leucinesupplement.html

www.springerlink.com/index/L64G882X7M706731.pd

www.fasebj.org/cgi/content/full/20/4/A170

The above were a couple of interesting articles and studdies I came across on Leucine. What was the peoples logic for taking it between meals out of curiosity?

interesting regarding blood flow. However getting nutrients into cells sounds easier than i’d imagine it is.

not least is absorbtion rates. Some take BCAAs during the workout but i’m never convinced that enough can be digested and become used in so short a timescale. Eating/drinking protein 60-30 mins before hand i understand, as some digestion takes place.

Some years ago i wondered why the focus was always on post workout food when that seemed ‘too late’ in the sense that you’d be eating afterwards and by the time you started digesting it a number of those imortant processes had already happened.

All interesting.

In practice i think it reinforces the benefit of pre and post nutrition but getting the exact timing and quantities right is subject lots of variables i would think

laroyal

Do you think that is necessary insuline by carbs for its work? Acordong to studdies I don´t see a clear results and I´m wondering if taking it during keto diet, with meals or as your portocol, it would be efective.

Thanks.

Leucine or glycine can solicit a sufficent insulin response if you are on a low carb diet but generally speaking I DO reccomend carbs around your workout.

[quote]gswork wrote:
interesting regarding blood flow. However getting nutrients into cells sounds easier than i’d imagine it is.

not least is absorbtion rates. Some take BCAAs during the workout but i’m never convinced that enough can be digested and become used in so short a timescale. Eating/drinking protein 60-30 mins before hand i understand, as some digestion takes place.

Some years ago i wondered why the focus was always on post workout food when that seemed ‘too late’ in the sense that you’d be eating afterwards and by the time you started digesting it a number of those imortant processes had already happened.

All interesting.

In practice i think it reinforces the benefit of pre and post nutrition but getting the exact timing and quantities right is subject lots of variables i would think[/quote]

Which is precisely why you don’t go into battle without ammunition. Eat before - train - eat after - sleep.

I love Milos, and have for decades, but sometimes he simply states the obvious.

DJ

[quote]laroyal wrote:
Freaky Styley wrote:
Laroyal, what’s your take on dosing leucine between meals? It’s an idea I’ve heard kicked around.

From the research I have come across it looks like the best times to take it would be 4G pre and post w/o and at night if you wake up and morning when you wake. I would simply add it to your post workout shake and mix some to sip at night or when you wake up.

www.fitflex.com/leucinesupplement.html

www.springerlink.com/index/L64G882X7M706731.pd

www.fasebj.org/cgi/content/full/20/4/A170

The above were a couple of interesting articles and studdies I came across on Leucine. What was the peoples logic for taking it between meals out of curiosity?[/quote]

Thanks for the links. The logic was to ensure that protein synthesis was always as high as it can be. As bulk leucine powder is cheap, I’m giving it a shot.

[quote]Freaky Styley wrote:
.[/quote]

LOL