T Nation

What Are The Pros Numbers?

Especially on this site, I’ve heard about Waterbury and Thibaudeau being “strong as hell”. If you dont mind, can you post your numbers?

Don’t take this the wrong way, I’m in no way doubting that you are strong as hell, I’m just wondering what your lifts are.

I would like to know also, no disrespect intended. I want to know in the same vein as Dave Tate does when he says that a coach needs to be strong in order to teach or coach strength.

[quote]Crow wrote:
I would like to know also, no disrespect intended. I want to know in the same vein as Dave Tate does when he says that a coach needs to be strong in order to teach or coach strength. [/quote]

Most coaches cannot run/pole vault/play x sport better than their charges. i understand the creadibility that comes with that, but a great coach understands, and gets the best from their student, managing their technique and mood.

It may be that they have succeeded in previous form, or that their skill is in the disemmination of sport, and analysis of movement.

I would still be interested though!

Within reason though. I am naturally very ectomorphic and will never put up Louie Simmons type numbers. This doesn’t necessarily mean I couldn’t be a good coach. The best teachers I have had in life were not necessarily the smartest, but they had an incredible ability to teach and convey information.

Good luck on this.

In CT’s Black Book of Training Secrets there is an interview with Shugart were he goes over some of his numbers. They are pretty good and well rounded. That book is a couple of years old too so he probably has some better lifts now.

the reason you wont put up Louie Simmons type numbers is because you tell yourself you wont put up Louie Simmons type numbers…get around some really strong people and train with them and you would be amazed at what can happen…rb

Please respect those who contribute to this site. If you use this thread to make negative comments and say how your cousin, uncle, brother, or baby sister could do better, recognize that you’re probably an idiot.

With that said, Thibaudeau’s #'s are found in first chapter of his “Black Book of Training Secrets” book. They are damn impressive:

Clean from blocks: 374 (lbs)
Power Clean from hang: 319 for 4 reps
Clean and Jerk: 357
Snatch (with straps): 291
Power Snatch: 264
Full Squat: 561 (raw)
Front Squat: 440
Push Press: 330
Bench Press (trains bench less than 3 months per year): 395

Correct me if I’m wrong, but Tate still benchs over 500 lbs., thats enough credibility for me. I think a good coach should have both the “book” knowledge of the sport and the “under the bar” experience. Without the book smarts he won’t know the why, and without the direct experience he won’t have the how. I’m not saying he has to have world class strength, but he sure as hell better have spent some time under the bar and have better than average strength. If he hasn’t then how is he really going to know what a certain exercise prescription (i.e. set-rep with X amount of weight) feels like. Just take a quick look at the “standard” CSCS, is this someone I’m going to go to and improve my strength (BTW I am a CSCS, so I can speak from first knowledge about we are required to know).

[quote]Crow wrote:
Correct me if I’m wrong, but Tate still benchs over 500 lbs., thats enough credibility for me. [/quote]

I’ve personally seen Dave bench 600 for reps. Under the bar knowledge will crush book smarts any day.

Find one or two strong training partners and prove it to yourself.

A good strength coach doesn’t really have to be stronger, but he should practice what he preaches.

My mentor is Bill Crawford, I’m much stronger than he is, but he can teach me all sorts of technique, tricks, etc. that keep me porgressing. I’m also much larger than Crawford, so absolute strength doesn’t mean as much.

As long as a coach both knows what he is talking about, and makes his own programs work in real life, he gets A’s from me.

I’ve personally seen Dave bench 600 for reps. Under the bar knowledge will crush book smarts any day.

Find one or two strong training partners and prove it to yourself.[/quote]

That’s my point, Tate is very credible. I totally agree with you.

[quote]slattimer wrote:
A good strength coach doesn’t really have to be stronger, but he should practice what he preaches.

My mentor is Bill Crawford, I’m much stronger than he is, but he can teach me all sorts of technique, tricks, etc. that keep me porgressing. I’m also much larger than Crawford, so absolute strength doesn’t mean as much.

As long as a coach both knows what he is talking about, and makes his own programs work in real life, he gets A’s from me.[/quote]

There is a difference between comparing an 800 pound bench to a 700 pound bench- versus comparing an 800 pound bench to 300.

Crawford is a legend, but you wouldn’t be so quick to take his advice if he could only bench 300.

Oh yeah, great job at the meet.

[quote]Soco wrote:
Within reason though. I am naturally very ectomorphic and will never put up Louie Simmons type numbers. This doesn’t necessarily mean I couldn’t be a good coach. The best teachers I have had in life were not necessarily the smartest, but they had an incredible ability to teach and convey information.
[/quote]
this is probably a bit off topic but
The best teachers that Ive ever noticed arent the ones that were hugely talented and had stuff come naturally to them and were ground breaking they were people that were not particularly “gifted” (for the given endeveaur) but made good progress and achieved a high level through doing things correctly, thinking things through, and doing the basics very well…

With maths if someone isnt understanding something the best teacher is the one that encountered the same difficulty and overcame it, not the person that inherintly and automatically knew it in the first place. The “gifted” type people generally say “you just do it” or “dont you understand this is easy” wheras the other will better explain and actually teach…

Now sports training is similar but not exactly the same… Ever seen a top boxer/basketballer (weightlifter etc anything really) make a million mistakes and still pull something freaky off? Those “freaky” types are not the best teachers…

Having said all that you can definetly learn from people that have seen the top of the mountain…

Tate and Simmons are good examples they put up big numbers despite being not nearly as gifted as the likes of Frank Coan Siders Vogeloph etc, their numbers arent nearly as good either… still though they are putting up good numbers have the educational background and have seen the top of the mountain… Thats how you create one of the most influential powerlifting templates in existance.

what Chris said.