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What are the Imbalances Seen in a Specific Sport?

Hi everyone!

I’d like to know, what are the imbalances seen in a specific sport?

In powerlifting, I think, we might see internal shoulder rotation, as in gymnastics. On the other side, rowers may not have that problem. Maybe some ilio-psoas thightness?

Your thoughts?
Also, what’s your sport, and what imbalances do/did you have/had to correct, and how do/did you do it?

As a swimmer you have a whole HOST of shoulder issues due to hyperextension and extreme flexion. This is remedied by land and swimming drills to bring up the lateral deltoid, as the anterior and posterior get worked much more than the lateral. Also swimmers have large lats, but smaller trapezius, rhomboids and chest muscles so work has to be done to correct those imbalances. What is neglected often, and will more often than not be the difference between a sub 55second 100 freestyle for example, is leg strength - as most strokes are primarily upper body dominated swimmers just don’t use them. I’ve been working on my legs like hell since the summer and hopefully it will make the difference at the nationals next week

In rugby I think hamstrings tend to be neglected. I think it is crucial to have RDL in a rugby specific weights routinme along with squats. Hamstring strains are quite common in rugby and could probably be reduced if correct stretching was performed and RDL to keep them balanced with quads.

I remember when the only hamstring exercise i did was leg curl and I ended up straining my hamstring quite bad when sprinting. Now I make sure to do an exercise that works the hamstrings from the hip joint after squats and frequent stretching after workouts and before sprint sessions.

I was told most soccer players are very quad dominant

[quote]soccerplayer wrote:
I was told most soccer players are very quad dominant[/quote]

Yep, quad dominant and almost no flexibility.
Often they get knee problems (ACL, femoro-patellar syndrom,…) because they don’t stretch their quads, psoas… While it’s easy for them to get big quads and calves, they don’t have quite as big glutes and hams as they could (or should?).

Finally, the constant change of direction causes sprains in both knees and ankles. So, stretching, accessory reinforcement work and rehab proprioception is often a must for that sport…

[quote]Bambi wrote:
As a swimmer you have a whole HOST of shoulder issues due to hyperextension and extreme flexion. This is remedied by land and swimming drills to bring up the lateral deltoid, as the anterior and posterior get worked much more than the lateral. Also swimmers have large lats, but smaller trapezius, rhomboids and chest muscles so work has to be done to correct those imbalances. What is neglected often, and will more often than not be the difference between a sub 55second 100 freestyle for example, is leg strength - as most strokes are primarily upper body dominated swimmers just don’t use them. I’ve been working on my legs like hell since the summer and hopefully it will make the difference at the nationals next week[/quote]

As a former competitive swimmer, I must agree with this. It wasn’t the case for me, because I always lifted in the off-season, but small pecs was a very common issue.

As a basketball player my ankle mobility/flexibility is awful and is something I have been really working on. Also, (maybe its just me), but I never do direct calf work at all yet my calves are still quite developed.

[quote]Ironwarrior25 wrote:
In rugby I think hamstrings tend to be neglected. I think it is crucial to have RDL in a rugby specific weights routinme along with squats. Hamstring strains are quite common in rugby and could probably be reduced if correct stretching was performed and RDL to keep them balanced with quads.

I remember when the only hamstring exercise i did was leg curl and I ended up straining my hamstring quite bad when sprinting. Now I make sure to do an exercise that works the hamstrings from the hip joint after squats and frequent stretching after workouts and before sprint sessions.[/quote]

+1. I would also add that as a prop I have experienced some shoulder mobility problems.

Pro jerkers prob have overdevloped forearm muscles (one more dominant than the other). And their postures are prob really poor as well from jerking while slouching in front of the computer.

I would say tennis elbow like symptoms