T Nation

What are Good Lifting Stats?

i’ve written this before, in two years i’ve gone from 148-187lbs., but what are good numbers range wise for Bench (barbell and dumbells) flat, inclined, declined respectively. Squat (back) both free and assisted w/ a Smith, deadlift, and shoulder presses. Rattle off some poundages please.

Thank you. I’m curious to see how my strength is progressing.

Bench- no idea because i don’t have a spotter and w/ long arms it seems my front delts and tri’s push more than chest. If i do bench (barbell in the future i’ll try a wider grip to nipple line to focus on chest more.

dumbells incline press 35’s warm up 45’s set 6-10 reps, 50’s same, 55’s same, 60’s if i’m fresh. (3-5 working sets)

flat’s similar weight could do more but lately i kill upper chest and am a bit tired by flats.

decline because of lat involvement 65’s 70’s 75’s 80’s sets 4-8 reps.

Shoulder press sets 35, 45, 55, 60, and back down (dumbells)

Squat on smith around 300 max. for 5 reps.

Deadlift i’ve just begun so no #'s yet.

I want #'s to shoot for. Overall my concern is mind muscle connection and controlled form focusing on the negative but i’d be lying if i said the poundage didn’t matter.

www.powerliftingwatch.com/node/1793

thanks…a powerlifer at my gym just started helping me w/ deadlifts, inside hand placement, (think sumo) has helped me, the form felt awkward as hell previously.

thanks for the site.

Read a book years ago where the author looks up to the guys in the gym who ‘bench 4 and squat 5’. Of course My brother and I couldn’t even come close at the time, so we focused on benching 3 and squating 4. Kinda keeping that 100 lbs difference in mind. Nothing technical, just some silly idea we both latched onto :slight_smile:

S

Its highly dependant on the person, you cant completely compare yourself to others, but heres what I think.

Bench: 300+
DB bench: 100’s (for reps)
Front squat: 350+
Back squat: 400+
Deadlift: 450+
Pullup: BW+ .5xBW

My only advice to you, is to stop squatting in the smith machine, get your deadlift up to a respectable amount, and start working pullups and rows (i assume you aren’t since you didn’t mention them.)

pull ups bodyweight 10 reps, 8 reps, 6-8 reps, and it’s all down hill from there.

rows are usually done one arm at a time 60, 65, 60,50 and a lower weight feeder at the end.

dips bodyweight sets, 25 plate, 45 plate, and back down.

The first bodybuilding book I ever read was by Stuart McRobert (Beyond Brawn) and he claimed that even “hardgainers” could get to the “300-400-500” level with years of hard work. That’s bench 300, squat 400, deadlift 500 (not exactly, but close).

My training has changed a lot since then, but I continue to strive for that and I will continue to think I’m a pussy until I reach it.

Are you powerlifting or bodybuilding? Its quite impossible to answer that question as there are many factors that come into play. What I do is look at my current lifts and concentrate on gradually improving on them, but I don’t powerlift and the number isn’t my only priority. Id rather get a clean 10-12 with the 100lbers on the flat DB bench than arch-back my way into 6-7 with 120s.

If you only have access to a smith for squats its better than not doing any IMO. I do front-squats on the Smith and find it alot easier to push myself to the point of vomitting than the free bar version. You don’t have to worry about the bar just your quads.

to answer the question what am I. I’m into the looks/aesthetics’s of of a bodybuilder but the competitive alpha side of me is into the power. Heavy power moves take intense concentration, it’s nice to lock into those clarifying moments, nothing else but you and the weight.

42…the answer is to everything

[quote]dankid wrote:
Its highly dependant on the person, you cant completely compare yourself to others, but heres what I think.

Bench: 300+
DB bench: 100’s (for reps)
Front squat: 350+
Back squat: 400+
Deadlift: 450+
Pullup: BW+ .5xBW

My only advice to you, is to stop squatting in the smith machine, get your deadlift up to a respectable amount, and start working pullups and rows (i assume you aren’t since you didn’t mention them.)[/quote]

What problem do people have with squatting in the smith…
Don’t tell me that it kills your knees, because mine still work perfectly well after 8 years of squatting in the smith.

[quote]bulldogtor wrote:
The first bodybuilding book I ever read was by Stuart McRobert (Beyond Brawn) and he claimed that even “hardgainers” could get to the “300-400-500” level with years of hard work. That’s bench 300, squat 400, deadlift 500 (not exactly, but close).

My training has changed a lot since then, but I continue to strive for that and I will continue to think I’m a pussy until I reach it.[/quote]

I’m going to say that “hardgainers” can do quite a bit more than that, unless they really have a metabolic or muscle-wasting disease.

The best gains I ever made in any short duration were during my grad school years. I didn’t have a lot of time to spend in the gym, and as such, was able to bust my ass on the basic lifts, and then because I was either in class, or studying, I could eat something (even if just a protein bar) every 2 hours. While I certainly didn’t get crazy with losing proper form, or throwing weights, I will say that in this instance, ‘chasing weights’ did pack some size on to my frame.

I only add this in because someone just questioned whether your purpose in training was more BBing, or PLing. Even though I wasn’t breaking any Lifting records, my simple workouts of Deads,CHins,BB Rows,and Incline DB curls (one example), took me a total of 45 minutes, I constantly tried for one more rep each week, and made noticable gains in a semester’s time frame.

S

[quote]bulldogtor wrote:
My training has changed a lot since then, but I continue to strive for that and I will continue to think I’m a pussy until I reach it.[/quote]

As soon as you hit 3/4/5 you’ll be happy for a few hours or so. Then you’ll feel like a pussy til you hit 350/450/550, or 4/5/6, etc. Thats the name of the game though!

[quote]cyruseven75 wrote:
to answer the question what am I. I’m into the looks/aesthetics’s of of a bodybuilder but the competitive alpha side of me is into the power. Heavy power moves take intense concentration, it’s nice to lock into those clarifying moments, nothing else but you and the weight. [/quote]

I applaud such a statement. Very few people train with such intensity. The gym is a motherfucking social gathering to some. A place to impress women and maybe score some ass, to others a town hall where you can discuss politics or whatever filth spews from their mouths.

All one can do in such a situation is to crank up the Ipod. Best wishes. -GB

Here is a good site. Not the highest numbers, but it should give you some idea of what’s going on.

http://www.exrx.net/Testing/WeightLifting/StrengthStandards.html

Deadlift…beginning stages, i’ve always felt uncomfortable w/ the movement mostly because i don’t/didn’t do it. my long arms and legs made it feel awkward and i worried about my back, e.g. “I was being a baby.”

lucky for me i now go to a gym, not a fitness center. several powerlifters are helping me, and i find pulling w/ hands inside the legs is more natural for me.

newbie deadlift stats, don’t spit out your whey whilst reading. 5*5 at 225lbs. i’m sure i could have went heavier but in the beginning i want to learn the movements, push through heels, be explosive, etc.

the guys advised against a belt early on because i’m not pulling crazy weight and the belt would do my back a disservice early on, e.g. create inherent weakness through false support. i tend to agree.

opinions on all this would be useful.

lol who uses a belt? lmao. good idea if you want weak erectors and less ab work.

i want a 3/_/7 …i was repping with 225 on the bench before i moved on to DBs and im using 90’s on flat bench so im assuming if i shot for a 1RM i could land 300, or close to it. i could probaly hit 5 on the DL by winter but i always thought the DL is easy for me and my back ahs always been my strongest and most aesthetic feature so i need to shoot pretty high on that. id say in 2 years ill be hitting near 6.

i really could care less about squat stats. it looks cool to do it but with shitty hips and long legs ill stick with leg press, hacks, ext’s, and regular back squats here and there.

[quote]Growing_Boy wrote:
Are you powerlifting or bodybuilding? Its quite impossible to answer that question as there are many factors that come into play. What I do is look at my current lifts and concentrate on gradually improving on them, but I don’t powerlift and the number isn’t my only priority. Id rather get a clean 10-12 with the 100lbers on the flat DB bench than arch-back my way into 6-7 with 120s.

If you only have access to a smith for squats its better than not doing any IMO. I do front-squats on the Smith and find it alot easier to push myself to the point of vomitting than the free bar version. You don’t have to worry about the bar just your quads. [/quote]

I second the smith machine front squats, I do regular ones too, but find the smith a little more comfortable and as GB said I don’t have to worry about the bar, just the quads. :wink:

don’t use the maxi pad on the bar tho or you would be a 2x pussy :stuck_out_tongue: lol jk

DG

[quote]cyruseven75 wrote:
Deadlift…beginning stages, i’ve always felt uncomfortable w/ the movement mostly because i don’t/didn’t do it. my long arms and legs made it feel awkward and i worried about my back, e.g. “I was being a baby.”

lucky for me i now go to a gym, not a fitness center. several powerlifters are helping me, and i find pulling w/ hands inside the legs is more natural for me.

newbie deadlift stats, don’t spit out your whey whilst reading. 5*5 at 225lbs. i’m sure i could have went heavier but in the beginning i want to learn the movements, push through heels, be explosive, etc.[/quote]

learn proper form first, I definitely agree. Same with squats.

[quote]
the guys advised against a belt early on because i’m not pulling crazy weight and the belt would do my back a disservice early on, e.g. create inherent weakness through false support. i tend to agree.

opinions on all this would be useful. [/quote]

I also agree that a belt is not needed. I generally don’t use a belt with neither squats or deads until I go above 315, then my belt is on.

looks like your on the right path. Getting over being a baby is probably the hardest part. Many people never get over it and they’ve been “working out” for years. They will never ever get the chance to “train” tho :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

DG