T Nation

Wework Refuses to Allow Employees to Expense Meat


#1

Seriously…


#2

“New research indicates that avoiding meat is one of the biggest things an individual can do to reduce their personal environmental impact,” said McKelvey in the memo, “even more than switching to a hybrid car.”

This belongs in the Stupid thread - not a whole new thread dedicated to it. Dumb policy but it’s private sector and literally one company. This private company’s policy isn’t something that’s wide-spread in any meaningful way.


#3

Says more about hybrid cars than anything else.


#4

Oh, I believe this will begin to be a prevalent string in our society as the Xennials and Millennials come into management. Wework is also a significant incubator space player for the tech sector where most of this style insanity is starting to rear its head.

Look for more of this type of behavior as time passes. I think its quite comical frankly, its like Whole Foods selling expensive meat and fish and the leadership funding anti-meat organizations with his foundation.

p.s. dont care where the thread is stuffed. Just wanted to share something, after all - it is “Off-Topic”


#5

I disagree. In an established company, they aren’t just going to hand over management responsibilities to someone who hasn’t proven they can handle it, steer the course, or implement reasonable policies. This is and will continue to be an outlier.

There might be some reports of start-ups doing crazy stuff like this - but it’s still not going to be a problem worthy of a thread insofar as the workers involved are free to seek employment elsewhere if they find the policies unreasonable. Again, this is a private company, and literally ONE example.

If you go looking for this type of behavior, it’ll most likely seem more prevalent than it really is when considering it’s relationship to the whole…confirmation bias, I believe, is the phenomenon.

Fair enough - The Stupid Thread is in PWI and this type of phenomenon is exactly why it was created. Cheers.


#6

Should I reference the Chuckle thread here or should I reference this article in the chuckle thread?


#7

Welp, they can suck my dick.
I don’t know what they do but for me it’s ‘won’t work’.
I ate a prime grade bone in Ribeye yesterday that would make you slap your mama.

I usually skip Ribeye’s because they are fatty, but this one was amazing. Medium-rare, butter and fat running down the side Ribeye’s just killing it.
One of the best ribeye’s I have ever had.

So I would expense the most expensive side and drinks I could and pay for the meat.


#8

It’s not widespread yet. It sounds like you’re dead wrong in your instincts on this.

WeWork are incredibly fashionable & influential - they are absolute leaders that so many people want to be part of/emulate.

WeWork’s policy on meat will be copied by other office businesses very soon.

I’d say 5 years & the top 3 most profitable office providers will have a no meat policy. An all vegan policy shortly after.

I believe within 15 years eating animals will be incredibly socially unacceptable, and the more forward thinking countries will make eating animals illegal within 15 years.

It’ll start with one of the more forward thinking European countries passing a ground breaking Animal Rights Act that recognises animals as having the right to be free from human pain, imprisonment & death.

That country will go on to become very fashionable by attracting great people & businesses.

Once that country is fashionable, other countries will follow & make eating animals socially unacceptable.


#9

Ah fuck it, I’ve been thinking about this for ages, I’m going to go vegan.


#10

It won’t be off the hands of a generational change. More likely someone idiot starved of power will make this their mission.

They will get fobbed up the chain until some decision maker who can get around the rules will get sick of constantly hearing about this crap. They’ll then check to see if they can fire this idiot and if they can’t they’ll give them what they want.


#11

Is it normal for an employer to feed employees, in addition to their normal paycheck? This seems so foreign. If my employer bought me a salad I’d be very thankful.


#12

Until they implement unpopular or cost policies - Fashionable does not equate to sustainable in a business environment

lol … I never said it wouldn’t - it just won’t be as wide spread as you think it will. It’s a shit policy that’s “virtue signaling” - It will not infect corporate culture at large.

Alright I have to think you’re trolling now…

Confirmed troll is confirmed. This is the dumbest shit I’ve read in a while lol - thanks for the laugh


#13

So it would seem that to many the concept of WeWork and what they do is foreign as is what we call “startup culture”.

WeWork is a shared office space environment, in some large tech hub centers in the US there is are many technology workers that are remote assets, contract employees or there is a group of technologists that work for a San Francisco based company but they are physically in say Austin. WeWork provides a “google-like” campus facility, open work spaces, huddle rooms, smaller quieter spaces and a total mix of things that are leased to ckmlniea or individuals to do their work. There is fast wireless or wired access, etc. There is music, relatively loud for my taste pumped into the open spaces, couches everywhere - essentially in some cases a lounge like atmosphere. There are sometimes, fully stocked fridges with beverages free for the taking. There is a or several cafes on site with chefs that cook to order - you pay for your meals normally. There are after hours events like knowledge shares or “learn Ruby” or whatever classes, mentirsships etc.

The idea is to make it a cool environment, that is secure (badge access) and kind of romper room stuff, drones flying around, nerds guns, massages etc for the employees to want to stick around - just like a normal startup in a large tech hub like Silicon Valley.

So WeWork is has multistory offices for rent in most major cities offering environments like this, individuals, large companies that don’t want to open a new branch and individuals can become members at different levels. The thing is that it’s attractive to many younger employees so it’s viewed as a recurring and retention tool as well.

So, WeWork has employees that travel for them between offices, they are on expense accounts like you would be in any company that requires travel. The way i read the article it says that WeWork has decided that they will no longer allow their employees (not their customers) to expense animal meat any longer when they travel on the company’s expense. I believe there is mention that they are planning to remove meat from their onsite customer facing cafes in the future as well.

WeWork is a big incubator space provider, they do have influence in the US market.

I hope this explains things a little more clearly.

Ps. When i was shopping for space for my Austin based engineering team i toured a facility in a multi story downtown - i saw the facility first hand. They bragged that when Obama was at SBSW in 2015 he and his team used a hidden office behind a bookcase as a safe room for him and showed it on the tour.


#14

I disagree. This decision will hurt them in the end.
People do not like having their behavior controled. And if you are traveling for said company they need to pay for necessities of life.
Road life is brutal enough.


#15

Yeah, it’s normal. Anytime you are on the road for your company you should be comped for all your meals. Generally, if you are by yourself, you are expected to have reasonable meals but if you are entertaining a customer or client, fine dining is often appropriate and even expected.


#16

…and they have competition. If they keep passing dumb restrictive policies like this, new startups won’t go to them and choose to go their competitors. When companies outgrow them, they’ll see their market share dwindling - then what?

They may attracted virtue signalers and the like, but that’s not the whole market and they operate in a competitive space - I don’t care how trendy they are or how much market share they happen to capture at the moment - things change and they don’t offer anything that special or niche to where they’re impervious to bad decisions - this happens to be one of them as I see it.


#17

Only time will tell, however this type of activity is entrenched. The coastal cities and some outposts in the middle tend to drive this culture.

Time will tell if this type of behavior will persist or not.


#18

I know when my previous employer stopped allowing alcohol to be “comped”, some were bugged by this. I wasn’t, and I always thought that while traveling to a conference, where drinking is typical, you do that on your own dime. It always rubbed me the wrong way that some would order an expensive bottle of wine and want to be comped for it. (my current University allows us to comp alcohol. Still, I’ll comp a single beer or glass of wine with dinner, but not “drinks” when going to a pub with colleagues).

But meat? What about fish? Does this count? Also, if their objective is to improve the health of the world and its people, why not outlaw anything with added sugars or fried foods? So, if I ordered a glass of milk, and grass-fed beef with rice and veggies, that’s a no? But if my colleague orders a soda, onion rings, and mac-n-cheese, that’s a-ok? Makes no sense to me.


#19

Same. Went to do a 6 week stint at a remote site. Our guys had gone batty with their credit cards. $75+ bottles of wine to accompany dinner…

Seems they are arguing environment and not health.


#20

I provide 3-5 meals a day to rig hands. (There are two or three “towers” (aka shifts)).