T Nation

Weights For Golfers?

Hey I have a question. What would be the best way to weight train for a golfer. Let’s describe the game of golf physically. It consists of anaerobic, short-of-failure, muscle bursts that include the entire body. These bursts are repeated about 100 times a round give or take 20. In between these, is a period of low speed walking where an individual walks up to somewhere around a mile around with 40 or so pounds on their back. I think that covers all the bases.

You see i have a friend who is a golfer, (so am i, i train traditional split style) and we had a go around of training that lasted about two months. I basically introduced him to the basic lifts and tried to get him to learn the moves as best as he could. I tried to train him basically using Westside style , but the problem is, he has a problem with the DOMS he usually experiences and how it affects his game. He has never been in any other sports, or really ever done anything active so him and DOMS don’t mix mentally with him.

I have convinced him to have a second go around and i want him to see improvements, not only in his body, but his game. I found a workout on the web for golfers, but it seems incredibly low in volume and intensity and i’m wondering if it will even do anything, here it is.

Hyperextensions-10 reps
Crunches-20 reps
Seated Barbell Twists 20 reps
Lat Pulldowns 10 reps
Skullcrushers 20 reps
Wrist Curls 20 reps

    all for two sets each and this is to be done twice a week. My question is if i should have him workout like this, or just give him a standard workout covering all the muscles and keep the reps high for anaerobic endurance and intensity low, or if i should just train him straight up with ranges from high intensity to low with i guess relatively low volume so he doesn't bitch. 

Not sure about how to train, but having a built chest does NOTHING for one’s swing on the drive. Makes me look like a friggen caveman swinging a club. Needless to say, I suck at golf…except Tiger Woods on PS2.

[quote]That One Guy wrote:
In between these, is a period of low speed walking where an individual walks up to somewhere around a mile around with 40 or so pounds on their back. I think that covers all the bases.

I basically introduced him to the basic lifts and tried to get him to learn the moves as best as he could. I tried to train him basically using Westside style , but the problem is, he has a problem with the DOMS he usually experiences and how it affects his game. He has never been in any other sports, or really ever done anything active so him and DOMS don’t mix mentally with him.

I have convinced him to have a second go around and i want him to see improvements, not only in his body, but his game. I found a workout on the web for golfers, but it seems incredibly low in volume and intensity and i’m wondering if it will even do anything, here it is.

Hyperextensions-10 reps
Crunches-20 reps
Seated Barbell Twists 20 reps
Lat Pulldowns 10 reps
Skullcrushers 20 reps
Wrist Curls 20 reps

    all for two sets each and this is to be done twice a week. My question is if i should have him workout like this, or just give him a standard workout covering all the muscles and keep the reps high for anaerobic endurance and intensity low, or if i should just train him straight up with ranges from high intensity to low with i guess relatively low volume so he doesn't bitch. 

[/quote]

Well first of all, walking a round of golf is probably more like 4 or 5 miles, not 1. But that’s not really the point.

I am a golfer too and I train full-body. Sometimes it can be tough to go out and play a round the day after a heavy lifting session, and I could see how if might affect one’s game.

I would have him focus on lower reps and higher intensity during his off season and basically have him do maintenance work during the season to maintain what he has built. That workout above looks like it wouldn’t do much for IMO expecially since there are no leg exercises.

I think Bill Hartman has a golf training web site at
www.yourgolffitnesscoach.com or something similar. You can find an interview of him done by Craig Ballentyne at www.bodybuilding.com/fun/cb2.htm

I’ve actually done a few old newsletters on this topic; check them out:

http://www.ericcressey.com/newsletter6.html
http://www.ericcressey.com/newsletter46.html

Enjoy!

Having more muscle will only help this guy. There is no other way I see it.

I would get the dudes, lower body, and back in top form. Mostly that, but “mirror muscle” can’t hurt, but wheels man, seriously.

Some people I got into weight training, saw improvements in their game, as their squat variations, and DL variations, went up. Same for Rows. I have the same xp personally.

On a side note, Woods, bench presses.

Take that with a grain of salt though. I AM NOT a coach. Further, I am average at best at golf.

Put a 45 pound plate on one end of an olympic bar and have them practice their swing with that =]

This is something that I have been curious about for quite some time. I have been playing golf seriously for approximately one year now (I currently play off a 5.0 handicap). At one point I did try to implement regular resistance training into my program, but also struggled with delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS).

I recall practicing one afternoon after completing an upper body workout the previous day. My ball striking (which is usually my strength) was appalling. I was constantly hitting ‘knuckleballs’ and could not achieve proper extension through the ball. From that point on, I decided to stop the resistance training.

The fact of the matter is that every day I’m not practicing (due to DOMS, injury, etc) is a day gained by the competition. However, I do not believe that my health and self-confidence should have to suffer due to the pursuit of golfing milestones.

It (the co-existence of golf and resistance training) can be achieved. Tiger Woods and Camilo Villegas are perfect examples. Apparently, Tiger Woods’ workout consists of stretching, cardiovascular exercise, resistance training (high weight, low repetitions), followed by more stretching.

Of course, that’s not as specific as us golfers would like, but apparently Tiger is reluctant to give out the details.

I look forward to hearing more responses in relation to this.

You’ve been playing golf for only a year and have a 5 handicap? Yeah, right. I nailed Jessica Biel last night, too…

[quote]That One Guy wrote:
Let’s describe the game of golf physically. It consists of anaerobic, short-of-failure, muscle bursts that include the entire body. These bursts are repeated about 100 times a round give or take 20. [/quote]

Using the word ‘anaerobic’ is not accurate. There is nothing explosive about the golf swing, unless maybe you want to count uncocking your wrists in the impact zone. A good golf swing is much more about turning your shoulders more than your hips and [i]staying loose throughout[/i].

(OK fine, Tiger’s swing is explosive. But just work on copying his setup and positions at the top and impact, NOT his swing speed)

As far as training goes, NCAA golfers do a lot of oblique and abdominal work to help transfer power from the legs to the hands and then to the ball.

I’m a golfer as well and have always just worked out, for lack of a better term, like a regular weightlifter, and have always dealt with the DOMS and in most cases,unless its a extreme, i can handle it but my friend doesn’t have it there mentally.

Yeah i was thinking about really concentration on the posterior chain and incorporating some movements that are like the golf swing. For instance, you know the exercise the pull-through? well i do that but taking a golf posture and turning my body to the side, for both sides. I think it will work well because the next day i felt it in my core. But we still have a big regional tournament next week so i don’t think i should hit him too hard yet. I guess ill take the advice and just train him “regularly” in the offseason. thanks for all the replies.

hmmm after reading Cressey’s article maybe i shouldn’t try to mimic the swing in training.
thanks man!!

[quote]chillain wrote:
That One Guy wrote:
Let’s describe the game of golf physically. It consists of anaerobic, short-of-failure, muscle bursts that include the entire body. These bursts are repeated about 100 times a round give or take 20.

Using the word ‘anaerobic’ is not accurate. There is nothing explosive about the golf swing, unless maybe you want to count uncocking your wrists in the impact zone. A good golf swing is much more about turning your shoulders more than your hips and [i]staying loose throughout[/i].

(OK fine, Tiger’s swing is explosive. But just work on copying his setup and positions at the top and impact, NOT his swing speed)

As far as training goes, NCAA golfers do a lot of oblique and abdominal work to help transfer power from the legs to the hands and then to the ball.

[/quote]

yeah sorry, i just couldn’t really explain what the golf swing is. words escaped me…