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Weightlifting Shoes For Squats/Sumo Deadlift


#1

I'll be getting adipowers soon and I was wondering what are your experiences with weightlifting shoes when it comes to the powerlifting movements. I might try using it for bench cause I've heard its more stable. How would having weightlifting shoes affect a low bar squat and would it be feasible to be used for sumo deadlifts. Tried on a friend's pair for some sumos and it felt easier to open my hips.


#2

[quote]Benanything wrote:
I’ll be getting adipowers soon and I was wondering what are your experiences with weightlifting shoes when it comes to the powerlifting movements. I might try using it for bench cause I’ve heard its more stable. How would having weightlifting shoes affect a low bar squat and would it be feasible to be used for sumo deadlifts. Tried on a friend’s pair for some sumos and it felt easier to open my hips.[/quote]

Very few people are able to pull optimally with a raised heel when dead lifting sumo or conventional.

It is possibly masking your lack of ankle mobility which is why it was easier to open your hips.

Weightlifters deadlift with them because it’s part of their sport, powerlifters should aim to mimic other powerlifters.

However if you feel it works and you can keep progressing go for it.


#3

I went years lifting in Chucks and did just fine. However, I got a pair of Pendlay Do-wins and really loved them for squats and bench. The raised heel is of course the big selling point, but I also appreciate how grippy the sole is. Makes it really easy to get some leg drive in on the bench.

However, I bench flat footed, because I used to compete in NASA and that was how you had to bench there. If you compete in a fed where you’re allowed to bench on your toes, I don’t know if it would work as well.

Deadlifting with weightlifting shoes sounds terrible.


#4

Olympic shoes are great to squat in and bench for powerlifters but to sumo in a pair just doesn’t make sense. You are putting yourself in less than advantageous position, work on hip mobility and proper setup for sumo. I use either a pair of converse or wrestling shoes to deadlift in.


#5

I own a pair of Adidas Powerlifts 2.0 and love them. They have a .6" heel as a opposed to the .75" inch heel the Adipowers have. I use my lifting shoes for Bench Press, OH Press, Front Squats and also Conventional Deadlifts. As of yesterday I switched back to my Chucks for Low Bar Squatting and my form felt a better.

I know a lot of people don’t recommend deadlifting in a raised heel but it seem to help me really drive with my legs more and my feet are glued to the floor. I have made pretty good progress with my deadlift in these shoes but I believe it is more my form getting better while wearing the shoes, not because of them. Pretty sure I would have the same result in my Chucks but why mess with anything if I’m still making steady progress. However there is no way I would do Sumo Deadlifts or Sumo Squats in those shoes.

Does not seem optimal but also the way the shoes are made I’m sure it would feel really uncomfortable. No where near as some of the guys giving you advice but just offering another point of view from someone who uses lifting shoes.


#6

I used my Romaleo IIs for squats until recently - they felt fine, but going to flats was much better. I’ve pulled conventional in them too, and flats are 100 times better. Same for sumo I reckon, although I haven’t even tried it in Oly shoes.

Work your hip mobility rather than rely on the shoes for sumo. So far, the absolute best shoe I’ve used for sumo are my Converse All Stars. I’m glued to the floor and can put as much pressure as I like on the outsides of my feet to spread the floor and push it away. Same for squats.

If your squat stance is medium to narrow, I can see the Adipowers being useful.


#7

Have a pair of oly shoes. They are okay. I like them for front squats, close stance high bar squats, and sometimes snatch grip deadlifts. When It comes to the competition lifts I only use them in the bench, strange as it may seem.


#8

Adidas PowerPerfect 2 for Squatting and Benching in.
Has a solid 1" Total difference between Heal and toe raise.

Deadlift in Slippers or Five Fingers.
The 1 " difference and the mechanics are huge.

Just my 0.02 cents worth.


#9

Nike Romaleos are stiffer than the Adipower.
I’ve tried both and the Romaleos felt better to me. Just a preference I guess, and been using them for cleans, snatches and obviously for squats.

For deadlifts, I’d rather go barefoot… I find it helps push through the heels more.

Hope this is helpsfull


#10

Do win are good for wide feet.


#11

What about if you have severe flat feet and thus weak ankles? I have zero arch in my feet and feel that sumos are easier on my lower back. I actually have some SI joint arthritis, but I have been cleared to lift as long as I take it easy. I just bought some Adipowers today and they feel great, but I haven’t had a chance to lift in them yet. I love that when I have them on I can feel the stiff arch in them. When I squat I often have to point my toes up and really focus on pushing my knees out, or my ankles and knees will push in. As it is, I can barely get to parallel with squats. I’m hoping these shoes fix the problem as I don’t have $20,000 to fix my feet since it’s considered a cosmetic surgery. My main concern is if they will work well with sumos. All I’ve read is how they can create more leg drive for conventional, but I hate conventional deadlifts as they’re rough on my lumbar. I’m hoping the arch in the shoes will simulate me having arches in my feet. I can’t imagine deadlifting in chucks.


#12

Best shoes for deadlifts are no shoes.

For squats I still don’t have a clue.


#13

I’m still amazed why someone would blow $125 on “weightlifting shoes” from Reebok or Adidas when a $50 pair of Chucks do the job better. Advertising and endorsement dupes the masses, as usual. A special shoe will not make you spread your knees, target the quads, pucker your asshole, or fix your form issues. Guys were banging out huge weight in flat, basic sneakers, 30 years ago before all the fads. Just my opinion, for whatever it’s worth.


#14

[quote]Antman517 wrote:
I’m still amazed why someone would blow $125 on “weightlifting shoes” from Reebok or Adidas when a $50 pair of Chucks do the job better. Advertising and endorsement dupes the masses, as usual. A special shoe will not make you spread your knees, target the quads, pucker your asshole, or fix your form issues. Guys were banging out huge weight in flat, basic sneakers, 30 years ago before all the fads. Just my opinion, for whatever it’s worth.[/quote]

If you squat with a shoulder width stance, they reduce the level of ankle mobility required and put far less strain on the knees. It’s smart long term management.


#15

[quote]Antman517 wrote:
I’m still amazed why someone would blow $125 on “weightlifting shoes” from Reebok or Adidas when a $50 pair of Chucks do the job better. Advertising and endorsement dupes the masses, as usual. A special shoe will not make you spread your knees, target the quads, pucker your asshole, or fix your form issues. Guys were banging out huge weight in flat, basic sneakers, 30 years ago before all the fads. Just my opinion, for whatever it’s worth.[/quote]

Not trying to justify myself but you do realize that some people do buy weightlifting shoes to practice weightlifting (clean/jerk and snatch) right? Besides, they do literally change your biomechanics and leverages. If it works for some people, who are you to tell them otherwise? The way I viewed it, the reason as to why I got my shoes was, I was interested in the oly lifts. I might try it with my power lifts and see how it goes. Either way, it’s a long term investment, ain’t nothing wrong with that. And on a side note, as far as I know, weightlifting shoes last pretty long. Chucks on the other hand, not that much. Not trying to sound like a douche or a smartass but I just felt like pointing this out.


#16

[quote]Benanything wrote:

[quote]Antman517 wrote:
I’m still amazed why someone would blow $125 on “weightlifting shoes” from Reebok or Adidas when a $50 pair of Chucks do the job better. Advertising and endorsement dupes the masses, as usual. A special shoe will not make you spread your knees, target the quads, pucker your asshole, or fix your form issues. Guys were banging out huge weight in flat, basic sneakers, 30 years ago before all the fads. Just my opinion, for whatever it’s worth.[/quote]

Not trying to justify myself but you do realize that some people do buy weightlifting shoes to practice weightlifting (clean/jerk and snatch) right? Besides, they do literally change your biomechanics and leverages. If it works for some people, who are you to tell them otherwise? The way I viewed it, the reason as to why I got my shoes was, I was interested in the oly lifts. I might try it with my power lifts and see how it goes. Either way, it’s a long term investment, ain’t nothing wrong with that. And on a side note, as far as I know, weightlifting shoes last pretty long. Chucks on the other hand, not that much. Not trying to sound like a douche or a smartass but I just felt like pointing this out.[/quote]

I bought a pair in November 2008 and still train and compete in mine. I bought them from a company in Winnipeg Manitoba.

Although I’ve squatted off and on in chucks, I return to my O-shoes because they have a significantly different feel to them.

The width of the sole and the hard structure prevents lateral movement of my foot. It feels like a much more solid base and my feet feel nailed to the floor.

The heel contributes to my set up benching as well. Because IPF states that your feet must be flat on the floor, when you have a heel, you can pull your feet back a bit further while keeping the heel in contact with the floor without hyper flexing your ankles. For me, the further back my feet go, the higher my arch goes.


#17

[quote]Benanything wrote:
And on a side note, as far as I know, weightlifting shoes last pretty long. Chucks on the other hand, not that much. [/quote]

If you’re only using the Chucks for lifting, they’ll last a LOOOOONG time. I wore the same pair of chucks for 3 years of lifting, and really only changed them out because I didn’t like the style (I got them on clearance but when I started competing I thought they looked goofy).

You’re not putting a lot of mileage on them if they’re just a lifting shoe.

But I really like lifting shoes for overhead pressing. Everything else has just been gravy on top.


#18

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]Benanything wrote:
And on a side note, as far as I know, weightlifting shoes last pretty long. Chucks on the other hand, not that much. [/quote]

If you’re only using the Chucks for lifting, they’ll last a LOOOOONG time. I wore the same pair of chucks for 3 years of lifting, and really only changed them out because I didn’t like the style (I got them on clearance but when I started competing I thought they looked goofy).

You’re not putting a lot of mileage on them if they’re just a lifting shoe.

But I really like lifting shoes for overhead pressing. Everything else has just been gravy on top.
[/quote]

Maybe I just ain’t using my chucks right. I usually use my chucks for both casual and lifting purposes. However, I do have a pair of chucks specifically for lifting and they still look pretty decent. The sides are opening up though but it doesn’t really affect my lifts so whatever.


#19

When I deadlift in my Nike Romeo’s, I tend to have more leg drive, but it puts me in a more forward leaning position. For max weight I’d prefer a flat sole.