T Nation

Weight-Loss Surgery Doubles Test Levels

http://jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/94/4/1329

Those who had Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery saw an average total testosterone increase of 310.8 ng/dL, almost doubling their original T-levels! And they were still clinically obese! It’s really weird; these weight-loss surgeries have been proven to put Type 2 Diabetes into remission, and now testosterone increases. This really needs to be looked into.

[quote]frank29 wrote:

Those who had Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery saw an average total testosterone increase of 310.8 ng/dL, almost doubling their original T-levels! And they were still clinically obese! It’s really weird; these weight-loss surgeries have been proven to put Type 2 Diabetes into remission, and now testosterone increases. This really needs to be looked into.[/quote]

called aromatase, you loose fat you have less enzyme to convert test to E so you will have higher test.

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[quote]bushidobadboy wrote:
MaddyD wrote:
frank29 wrote:

Those who had Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery saw an average total testosterone increase of 310.8 ng/dL, almost doubling their original T-levels! And they were still clinically obese! It’s really weird; these weight-loss surgeries have been proven to put Type 2 Diabetes into remission, and now testosterone increases. This really needs to be looked into.

called aromatase, you loose fat you have less enzyme to convert test to E so you will have higher test.

Well yeah, but only once the fat has come off. I’m unclear as to whether these guys’ T went up relatively quickly post-surgery, i.e. without significant weight loss.

BBB

EDIT: I’m going to post that link on the diabetes forum I frequent. Funny, but there are a lot of people there trying to lose weight but without success. Most of then are like “give me answers and solutions”. I explain about the elevated aromatisation from obesity and how they should get a blood panel and some arimidex and they then go quiet. Then the next guy shows up and they are all “Give me some answers” lol. Ahhh, sheep, despite actually being ‘forward thinking’ enough to be members/moderators on a diabetes forum.[/quote]
I agree, I wonder myself how long after this process did the T levels go up.

I cant really understand how the surgery itself can raise your levels.
essentially the surgery is a forced starvation diet,so that should lower test levels until the fat comes off and then it gets raised accordingly based on the body fat level.

Results: “After 2 yr, the gastric bypass surgery group…had an increase in total testosterone (310.8 ± 47.6 vs. 14.2 ± 15.3 ng/dl) and free testosterone (45.2 ± 5.1 vs. ?0.4 ± 3.0 pg/ml)”

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Lol. Here’s the discussion.

In our study population, lower free testosterone levels and diminished ratings for sexual quality of life were correlated with increased BMI. Among subjects losing weight through bariatric surgery, there was a reduction in estradiol levels, an increase in total and free testosterone levels, and an increase in ratings for sexual quality of life. Studies in the literature had convergent findings on the relation between weight loss, testosterone levels, and sexual function. Leenen et al. (11) did not find a correlation between body fat distribution and free or total testosterone.

Weight loss was not associated with change in free and total testosterone. Niskanen et al. (14) showed that abdominally obese men increased their free and testosterone levels after a very low-calorie diet; however, there was no change in estrogen levels. Kaukua et al. (13) showed that weight loss increases free and total testosterone; however, it did not change sexual function scores.

To the contrary, Esposito et al. (15) demonstrated that sexual function improves after a weight reduction program. Bastounis et al. (19) found an improvement in SHBG and total testosterone and a reduction in estradiol after gastric bypass surgery; however, the change in free testosterone was not significant. Globerman et al. (20) found an improvement in free and total testosterone in 16 obese men who underwent silastic ring gastroplasty.

In summary, prior individual studies agree with some of our findings, although there is concurrence when these studies are considered in aggregate. This may be in part due to our larger sample size, which confers greater power to detect changes, and in part to differing effects of different types and degrees of weight loss.

Our study has several strengths, including a detailed anthropometric evaluation, long follow-up period (2 yr), a relatively large number of participants, and presence of a control group. Weaknesses of this study include the exclusion of a number of men because of lack of follow-up and unavailable blood samples. However, the excluded men had similar anthropometric characteristics in comparison to the study sample.

We did not find an association between change in body fat and hormonal and sexual quality of life parameters, despite a correlation between these and change in weight; this may be due to the limitations of the bioelectric impedence when compared with other techniques such as dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans. The correlation between body weight, BMI, and SHBG is well established, yet it was not seen in our study population.

It is likely that this is attributable to the narrow range for BMI, with associated very depressed SHBG levels in our study population. Inclusion of less obese and normal weight subjects would likely reveal this known correlation. Our results highlight an association between sexual quality of life and hormonal measures independent from weight. Because this relationship is confounded by biopsychosocial aspects of obesity, further studies are required to demonstrate a cause and effect relationship.

Another possibility is that the surgery greatly increased insulin sensitivity, which in turn increased testosterone levels. There is a documented direct relationship between insulin sensitivity and testosterone levels in men.

In Type 2 diabetics who get this surgery, their insulin sensitivity shoots up within days after the surgery, even before any real weight-loss. I believe it has something to do with certain hormones produced in the small intestine.

Actually, I think the most important thing about this study is that it is possible for people to naturally increase their testosterone levels. This may, in the long term, change the ways in which medicine treats hypogonadism. I’m thinking that increasing insulin sensitivity somehow (exercise? medication?) looks like it will help.

T2 diabetes runs in my family, and am overweight (BMI 31), so I wonder if lifting and conditioning work will increase my testosterone, and not just temporarily.

[quote]bushidobadboy wrote:

EDIT: I’m going to post that link on the diabetes forum I frequent. Funny, but there are a lot of people there trying to lose weight but without success. Most of then are like “give me answers and solutions”. I explain about the elevated aromatisation from obesity and how they should get a blood panel and some arimidex and they then go quiet. Then the next guy shows up and they are all “Give me some answers” lol. Ahhh, sheep, despite actually being ‘forward thinking’ enough to be members/moderators on a diabetes forum.[/quote]

It actually is much more complicated for diabetics to lose weight. Most don’t understand the glucagon connection, which can be difficult considering release from the alpha cells becomes more unpredictable with time.

Also women have to deal with differing levels of insulin sensitivity due to their monthly cycle. Also exercise can cause hypo/hyper depending on intensity, which most dont realize, they also have to deal with stress causing elevated blood sugars.

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Insulin sensitivity is still something of a mystery, as to why some people are good with it & others are bad. I did read a study which found that insulin resistance impedes the secretion of testosterone from the Leydig cells. The one thing I know for sure from reading about bypass surgeries is that insulin sensitivity improved significantly, even before any serious weight loss.

I’m guessing that the combination of increased insulin sensitivity, combined with the greatly reduced aromatase production, probably caused the spike in T levels in this study.