T Nation

Weight Lifting Percentage Chart


#1

You guys think this is accurate?

http://www.criticalbench.com/weight-training-chart.htm


#2

Sub-max charts are pretty common. They of course will vary by lifter. Power lifters will have higher 1 rep maxes than their multi-rep value. Bodybuilders will probably be the opposite.

I just looked at my squat… it is pretty close.


#3

It also depends on your body structure as well. Some people are built for squatting so have strong squat and weak deadlift. Or big deadlift and bad squat build etc.


#4

? then wouldn’t your one rep max reflect that as well… or am I missing something


#5

Well yeah it does really. For example @planetcybertron is ungodly strong at squatting but her deadlift isnt anywhere near the same level (sorry planetcybertron lol)


#6

ffs use a calculator which uses whichever equation you wish not some big arse chart.

As for its utility… lift a while and you should know yourself, your lifts and have maxed, reps or otherwise recorded somewhere.


#7

Yea pretty much.

your proportions do play a bit of a big role in terms of poundage lifted.

Generally speaking everyone’s deadlift is usually more than their squat.

A few reasons my squat is more than my deadlift is because I have unreasonably short arms, a torso that’s longer than my femurs, an a decently fucked up lower back. But to an extent, the difference really isn’t that much. Maybe 50-60 pound difference, although for some people the difference can be a heck of a lot higher.

sometimes your frequency on individual lifts matters a bit too. If you’re cycling your squat a lot more frequently than your deadlift that can be a factor to consider.

Most charts like that tend to hit in the same field. Either way you ballpark it you’ll be fine.


#8

I think it would be more accurate if it was sorted by lift, but than it would be even bigger and uglier.


#9

#10

Calculating a 1RM is typically done by the Epley Formula and it’s just an estimate. One equation is probably as good as the other. This chart is just based on an equation, nothing more, nothing less. Knowing the equation eliminates the need for the chart.

To calculate the 1RM I would multiply reps by weight to calculate volume, then volume by .033, add that number to the original weight.

Say my 5RM squat is 315. 5X315 = 1575.

1575 x .033 = 51.9

315+51.9=367 1RM.

If you have a 1RM and want to figure out what your 5RM is, you can just change up the equation.

367 x .033 = 12. Multiply 12 by number of reps, in this case 5, 5x12=60.
367-60 = 307. Not exactly 315, but close.

Mindless drivel for you to consider.


#11

I’ve found my top triple is a pretty good indicator for my max at any given time. Anything more than a triple and it gets more and more inaccurate.


#12

I find most charts/calculators very accurate except for my deadlift in which case they underestimate what I can do. YMMV