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Weight Lifted Per Set or Weight Lifted per Session?


#1

Recently I have been doing a ton more volume for my deadlift, my hope is to nail in my form, looking over my numbers from the last few sessions I noticed a huge change.

When I deadlifted before I worked up to a very heavy single for 3 or 4 sets, for me this is only 160kg (353lb), but when I add up my weights from that session the total volume of weight I lifted was only 1,530kg (3373lb)

However with my lower weights and higher volume of sets while I nail in my form my total volume of weight lifted sky rockets to between 5000kg-7000kg (11,023lb-15,432lb)

What I'm not sure of is will all this added volume will do anything for my maximal strength? I'm work with single and doubles between and use 80% of my maximum weight, is this going to do anything expect build up my endurance and grip strength? and is it worth it in the long run?


#2

I’m not sure worrying about weight lifted per workout is the way to go.

When I did singles myself, I also did high rep work for deadlifts to go along with it (8 setz of 12 not to failure). But I think you have to be more careful with your form on higher rep sets, because towards the end of the sets is where I find my form starts to slip. Not as much on the lower rep sets.


#3

[quote]ASlingsby1 wrote:
Recently I have been doing a ton more volume for my deadlift, my hope is to nail in my form, looking over my numbers from the last few sessions I noticed a huge change.

When I deadlifted before I worked up to a very heavy single for 3 or 4 sets, for me this is only 160kg (353lb), but when I add up my weights from that session the total volume of weight I lifted was only 1,530kg (3373lb)

However with my lower weights and higher volume of sets while I nail in my form my total volume of weight lifted sky rockets to between 5000kg-7000kg (11,023lb-15,432lb)

What I’m not sure of is will all this added volume will do anything for my maximal strength? I’m work with single and doubles between and use 80% of my maximum weight, is this going to do anything expect build up my endurance and grip strength? and is it worth it in the long run?[/quote]

Higher volume is fine if you can recover from it. You won’t be able to maintain it. You will need to rest or de-load.

Volume adds strength over time. Can’t do w/o it. The trick is to add volume little by little over time. Don’t be in a hurry to get to the bigger weight. It will come w/ time. Very few lifters are just strong out of the box and just make huge gains every time they touch a weight. Most of us it takes time over the long haul; so be patient. Make small changes and keep getting stronger.


#4

It can help build muscle and strength but don’t forget to cycle back through high intensity work to take a break from the high volume and to focus on maximal strength again. The amount of volume for an individual session matters in terms of having the work capacity to get through it but overall the volume over an entire cycle is what’s important for keeping track of volume progress over the long term. The small details of individual sessions are important but don’t forget the big picture too.

With that said, an increase in volume doesn’t necessarily mean your form will improve. If you do twice as much work but in the exact same way, the results may or may not change. You may get slightly stronger with your form looking the same. It depends how you perform each and every rep, even with limited opportunities. For me, working with 90+% is better at evaluating technique improvements so cycling through high intensity after the high volume is beneficial in that aspect as well.


#5

Just for the note: Doing dead stop training has improved my form a lot just in 2 weeks.

I don’t know how you Deadlift, but like guys above said: just focusing on the form is more important than the volume when trying to get better with technique. Film your lifts, or if you have (reliable) lifting buddy, ask him/her to comment your form. Normally form is easier to handle with smaller weights. Smaller weights can be used also with greater volume.

As for the topic of the thread: Both are important. You should maybe read some articles about training volume, intensity and periodisation, if you haven’t done that yet. General rule for many lifters is working in different phases from high volume and lower weight towards higher intensity, but lower volume.

Then there is some crazy shit like smolov, where everything is high (volume, intensity, frequency).