T Nation

Weight and Form

I know youre not supposed to throw form to the wind, but dont you hate those people that constantly bitch about form? Anyone who uses heavy weight knows that you have to use good form, but you wont use perfect form like you would with a much lower weight.

I saw a youtube vid of this guy doing incline presses with 210 lb dumbbells. His form was good, not perfect, but it wouldnt be anyways using that kind of weight. Im sure some ass, who couldnt lift that size dumbbell off the ground with both hands if his mothers life depended on it told him “you need to lower the weights to the 50s and feel the contraction.” The guy inclining the 210s shouldve told the ass “Show me, using these 210s, how my form should look.” Of course, the guy talking about form probably couldnt budge said weight, thus would be unable to show him.

Of course, is it just me or is it that every one that talks that perfect form bullshit can never lift the weight theyre trying to tell you that youre doing wrong?

Perfect form allows you to lift more weight.

It’s just you. Usually people who lift with perfect form can lift alot of weight.

Invictica got it right as usual.
NOW spend some time thinking about what he really said. Hint: Perfect form ain’t textbook form.

Setting: Utube lifting video and bunch of LDWB losers commenting.
BIG dude posts video moving heavy-ass weight.

Utubeloser1: Yea you moved the weight but Id be verrry impressed if you used HALF the weight and did the exercise correctly (switches back to playing WoW or posting on 4chan)

Utubeloser2: Hah, you’re doing it wrong, you are not working the right muscles. And lay off the steroids.(resumes fapping to vids of BBers performing lat spreads and cant wait till he sprouts lats of his own some day).

Utubeloser3: Do the exercise correctly or don’t do it. Anyone can lift heavy if they use bad form, hahahaha. (resumes cleaning skateboard while listening to “skate’boi” for the bazillionth time)

Utubeloser4: SHITTTY form. Also ROIDS…no one can be that big naturally with such terrible form.

Utubeloser5: do you think your impressing anyone, hahahaha? you got tiny balls from all that roid usage. Also horrible form.

Utubeloser6: SIGH why does it always have to be about the weight. Remember what the “Muscle Nerd” said in his “gain 25 LEAN pounds in 6 weeks” course…BAD FORM = NO gains. Also agreed on the 'roids.

The closer you get to maximal weight, the more your form goes out the window. It’s when you’ve gotten stronger and your form because better with the maximal weight, is when you should start re-thinking your max. It’s always good when you progress and every week your form becomes more precise and strict. I remember starting out and benching 135lbs with shitty form. And now, it’s just one of my warm up sets.

If your doing a max with perfect form it isnt a max.

No one ever has perfect form, just differnt good and bad aspects of the movement.

Plus, everyone’s opinion on form is differnt, aka ROM tempo and varying aspects.

I honestly dont think it is a huge issue unless your being a massive dickhead RE:form.

Improved form on stuff like deadlift and squats has helped me improve my numbers significantly, even with that im still working on it each week because i know i can do it a little better, i have dodgy bits.

Don’t we all.

as long as you aren’t putting yourself at risk of injury it doesn’t really matter. This is more something that has to do with experience, I wouldn’t recommend a newbie to cheat and use bad form.

[quote]tribunaldude wrote:
Invictica got it right as usual.
NOW spend some time thinking about what he really said. Hint: Perfect form ain’t textbook form.

Setting: Utube lifting video and bunch of LDWB
BIG dude posts video moving heavy-ass weight.

Utubeloser1: Yea you moved the weight but Id be verrry impressed if you used HALF the weight and did the exercise correctly (switches back to playing WoW or posting on 4chan)

Utubeloser2: Hah, you’re doing it wrong, you are not working the right muscles. And lay off the steroids.(resumes fapping to vids of BBers performing lat spreads and cant wait till he sprouts lats of his own some day).

Utubeloser3: Do the exercise correctly or don’t do it. Anyone can lift heavy if they use bad form, hahahaha. (resumes cleaning skateboard while listening to “skate’boi” for the bazillionth time)

Utubeloser4: SHITTTY form. Also ROIDS…no one can be that big naturally with such terrible form.

Utubeloser5: do you think your impressing anyone, hahahaha? you got tiny balls from all that roid usage. Also horrible form.

Utubeloser6: SIGH why does it always have to be about the weight. Remember what the “Muscle Nerd” said in his “gain 25 LEAN pounds in 6 weeks” course…BAD FORM = NO gains. Also agreed on the 'roids.

[/quote]

haha i love it. had to double check to make sure i wasnt in fact looking at a youtube video!

I’d have to agree with Invictica and tribunaldude, In bodybuilding form is of the utmost importance if you’re striving for that deft combination of balance and symmetry. Progression with your weight should automatically be part of a lifters future plan. Max singles, imho, SHOULD NEVER BE PART OF A BODYBUILDERS ROUTINE! The exception comes only when and if they’re switching to a powerlifting cycle.

Steroids or not, Lee Haney, Frank Zane, Ronnie Coleman and Lee Labrada are examples of those who hoisted some pretty heavy weight with excellent form. It was Vince Gironda who popularized performing a move with no weight until a trainees form was exemplary. There’s a reason for that.

[quote]johnson575 wrote:
The closer you get to maximal weight, the more your form goes out the window. It’s when you’ve gotten stronger and your form because better with the maximal weight, is when you should start re-thinking your max. It’s always good when you progress and every week your form becomes more precise and strict. I remember starting out and benching 135lbs with shitty form. And now, it’s just one of my warm up sets.[/quote]

Im not talking about using shitty form. Just saying using good or good enough form with heavy weight. For instance someone that can incline press a pair of 150s might use good form doing it, but not the perfect form he could with the 80s. Sometimes its woorth letting form suffer, just a little bit, in the name of being stronger.

Thats nowhere near what either of us said.

[quote]oldewise1 wrote:
I’d have to agree with Invictica and tribunaldude, In bodybuilding form is of the utmost importance if you’re striving for that deft combination of balance and symmetry. Progression with your weight should automatically be part of a lifters future plan. Max singles, imho, SHOULD NEVER BE PART OF A BODYBUILDERS ROUTINE! The exception comes only when and if they’re switching to a powerlifting cycle.

Steroids or not, Lee Haney, Frank Zane, Ronnie Coleman and Lee Labrada are examples of those who hoisted some pretty heavy weight with excellent form. It was Vince Gironda who popularized performing a move with no weight until a trainees form was exemplary. There’s a reason for that.[/quote]

you lost credibility as a lifter 10 times faster when you use the words “shitty form” btw.

Carry on.

[quote]clip11 wrote:
johnson575 wrote:
The closer you get to maximal weight, the more your form goes out the window. It’s when you’ve gotten stronger and your form because better with the maximal weight, is when you should start re-thinking your max. It’s always good when you progress and every week your form becomes more precise and strict. I remember starting out and benching 135lbs with shitty form. And now, it’s just one of my warm up sets.

Im not talking about using shitty form. Just saying using good or good enough form with heavy weight. For instance someone that can incline press a pair of 150s might use good form doing it, but not the perfect form he could with the 80s. Sometimes its woorth letting form suffer, just a little bit, in the name of being stronger.[/quote]

[quote]tribunaldude wrote:
Thats nowhere near what either of us said.

oldewise1 wrote:
I’d have to agree with Invictica and tribunaldude, In bodybuilding form is of the utmost importance if you’re striving for that deft combination of balance and symmetry. Progression with your weight should automatically be part of a lifters future plan. Max singles, imho, SHOULD NEVER BE PART OF A BODYBUILDERS ROUTINE! The exception comes only when and if they’re switching to a powerlifting cycle.

Steroids or not, Lee Haney, Frank Zane, Ronnie Coleman and Lee Labrada are examples of those who hoisted some pretty heavy weight with excellent form. It was Vince Gironda who popularized performing a move with no weight until a trainees form was exemplary. There’s a reason for that.

[/quote]

I wasn’t trying to get near what either of you said Einstein! I just stated that I agree with your comments. I was passing on some real knowledge to someone (not you!) who needs to understand the importance of proper form.

[quote]oldewise1 wrote:
tribunaldude wrote:
Thats nowhere near what either of us said.

oldewise1 wrote:
I’d have to agree with Invictica and tribunaldude, In bodybuilding form is of the utmost importance if you’re striving for that deft combination of balance and symmetry. Progression with your weight should automatically be part of a lifters future plan. Max singles, imho, SHOULD NEVER BE PART OF A BODYBUILDERS ROUTINE! The exception comes only when and if they’re switching to a powerlifting cycle.

Steroids or not, Lee Haney, Frank Zane, Ronnie Coleman and Lee Labrada are examples of those who hoisted some pretty heavy weight with excellent form. It was Vince Gironda who popularized performing a move with no weight until a trainees form was exemplary. There’s a reason for that.

I wasn’t trying to get near what either of you said Einstein! I just stated that I agree with your comments. I was passing on some real knowledge to someone (not you!) who needs to understand the importance of proper form. [/quote]

It is impossible to define ‘proper form’. The form needed to accomplish a certain goal will be different depending on the person. What Vince Gironda says is ‘proper form’ will not apply across the board. In addition, proper form will change over the course of someone’s lifting career.