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Wave Loading Appropriate for Accumulation Phase?


#1

Hi CT,

In your opinion is wave loading in the 6-10 rep range using between 60 and 70% of max an appropriate strategy for an accumulation block?


#2

[quote]Beara33 wrote:
Hi CT,

In your opinion is wave loading in the 6-10 rep range using between 60 and 70% of max an appropriate strategy for an accumulation block?[/quote]

No. Wave loading doesn’t work with higher reps.

Wave loading works by increasing force potential through an increase in neural activation.

See, when you lift a weight two things happen:

  1. An increase in activation… the intense muscle contraction amps up the nervous system (called post-tetanic potentiation) which increases force potential for 2-5 minutes. THE MORE FORCE YOU PRODUCE, THE GREATER THE ACTIVATION. Activation increases force potential for subsequent sets.

  2. An increase in fatigue … doing repetitions depletes energy stores, accumulates waste products and create fiber fatigue. This can DECREASE force potential. And the more reps you do, the more fatigue you create.

When doing sets of 6-10 there is little activation and significant fatigue… fatigue will almost always exceed activation… the result is that your potential to produce force is decreases as you do more sets.

When you do lower reps you create more activation and cause less fatigue. This will mean that activation exceeds fatigue, which increases your potential to produce force in the next set.


#3

Thank you. Would sets of 1 to 3 for 90 plus percent work in a realization block in that case or would you say wave loading has no place within block periodization period?


#4

[quote]Beara33 wrote:
Thank you. Would sets of 1 to 3 for 90 plus percent work in a realization block in that case or would you say wave loading has no place within block periodization period? [/quote]

Wave loading works in any type of scheme that calls for weights in the 85-100% range


#5

Thanks for the thorough explanation and for helping me to understand the application.