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Warrior Diet Log

I like how you conveniently cut out the rest of my post that covered the flip-side of the coin, encouraging you to try it and see… anyway, I think your mind is made up. Good luck, keep us posted.

I followed the diet for a few months a while back, and I can honestly say that if I was not a powerlifter, this is the way that I would eat. I loved being freed from the necessity of eating 5 or 6 times a day, I felt extremely energetic and healthy…almost had unlimited energy.

But my bench press went down. My squat to a lesser degree, and my deadlift not at all. But I couldn’t keep bodyweight on no matter how much I would eat at night, and I’m talking 5,000 plus calories. Whoever said calories in/calories out is everything may be right most of the time, but it didn’t apply to me here.

I dumped a ton of fat but just couldn’t keep bodyweight on no matter what. So, maybe someday I’ll go back, but not til I get my elite total and reach old age.

To the OP, I did drop a ton of fat at a startling rate, and the strength loss was only a problem for me b/c I had already built a lot of strength that I didn’t want to lose. If you don’t have major strength goals, it shouldn’t be a problem. If you are worried about muscle loss, I would strongly consider using BCAAs (a lot of them) during the day along w/ glutamine (a lot of it).

Best of luck.

[quote]T Affliction G wrote:
I like how you conveniently cut out the rest of my post that covered the flip-side of the coin, encouraging you to try it and see… anyway, I think your mind is made up. Good luck, keep us posted.[/quote]

My apologies, T Affliction, I meant to address the rest of your post but totally forgot. Thank you for your reasonable reply to my inflammatory response. You said, “I would recommend doing something a bit more time-tested at your age.”

However, I’d argue that at my age it’s not such a huge deal if I don’t do the time-tested thing, becaues if it fails, then I’ve still got plenty of time to work back up to where I was before, and being young it would be easier to do that than if I was say, 30 or something. And yes, don’t worry, I’m not afraid to “nip it in the bud if your performance starts to slide.”

I’m fully aware of the fact that this might not work out, and I’ll not keep on stubbornly sticking to it if it turns out to suck. Thanks for the advice, though.

[quote]T Affliction G wrote:
Good luck, keep us posted.[/quote]

Thanks, will do.

Mick28 - I did a search on google images and looked through 10 pages of results without finding any picture of him. But hey, if you say he looks small and weak I’ll take your word for it. And yeah, don’t worry, I understand that you’re not bashing it.

Miserere - Thanks for the advice. I’m wondering, however, if I decide to measure my arms, for example, what the standard is? Like, do you measure halfway down your upper arm, do you measure flexed, straightened, straightened with tricep flexed, or what? How do you know what standard to use?

And also, I don’t have skin-fold calipers, unfortunately. Do you think it’s worth buying any, and do you think they’re very accurate? One last question: you said get a blood test done? Where would I go to get a blood test, and what would it actually tell me about myself?

Ramo - Thanks for you feedback, I appreciate you relating your own experience with the diet. When you say you couldn’t keep bodyweight on, do you mean that you couldn’t get muscle mass while on the diet?

As a closing note, I want to again apologize for my actions, T Affliction G, since I kind of blew up at you there a bit and I was out of line. Again, thanks for being reasonable when I wasn’t.

Thanks to all who have posted so far and given me advice and told me about their experiences with the diet!

-Faenon

[quote]Faenon wrote:
Miserere - Thanks for the advice. I’m wondering, however, if I decide to measure my arms, for example, what the standard is? Like, do you measure halfway down your upper arm, do you measure flexed, straightened, straightened with tricep flexed, or what? How do you know what standard to use?[/quote]

The “standard” is arm straight and relaxed, but as long as you always measure them the same way (flexing, if you want) then it doesn’t matter.

At the very least you should measure your waist and neck to track fat loss/gain and get an estimate of your bodyfat %.

I think it is worth getting a pair. They’re not that expensive and they’re the best way to track fat gain/loss. For example, I can stop losing fat around my waist, but still lose in my legs; if I didn’t use the calipers on both sites I wouldn’t know this and might think that my fat loss had stalled if I just measured my waist circumference.

Maybe I’m just over analytical, but I like to keep track of as many variables as possible. :slight_smile:

Talk to your GP about getting a test. I think this is important because you want to know (or at least I would like to know if I changed my diet drastically) how the diet is going to affect your body, and fat/muscle gain/loss is just one part of it.

If I followed a diet that made my cholesterol and triglycerides skyrocket, I would abandon it. Your blood profile can also tell you about the health of important internal organs such as your liver and kidneys.

Hey, make sure you take some pics, even if you don’t plan on posting them, I’m sure you’ll appreciate having some before/after pics to show your grandchildren :wink:

Miserere, that was an awesome post, thank you very much. Currently I’m measuring waist, hip (just below my gut, essentially), chest, and neck. I’ll add arms and thighs to my list, as well. I’ll also look into getting some calipers - any in particular that you’d recommend (preferably the cheapest you know of).

[quote]Miserere wrote:
Maybe I’m just over analytical, but I like to keep track of as many variables as possible. :slight_smile: [/quote]

Me too. The more variables I’m keeping track of, the more I know what’s going on, and the more accurate I am. And the more accurate I am, the more certain I can be of my evaluation. To a certain extent of course - if I include too many variables I just get bogged down.

I’ll talk to my GP about getting a blood test, and I’ll see how that goes.

[quote]Miserere wrote:
Hey, make sure you take some pics, even if you don’t plan on posting them, I’m sure you’ll appreciate having some before/after pics to show your grandchildren ;-)[/quote]

Hahah yeah. I actually have been taking pics (along with other measurements), but I posted them on my blog ( http://warriordietlog.blogspot.com/ ) instead of on here, since I intended for my blog to be my main source of letting people (and myself) know how the diet is working out. However I’m starting to think that maybe I should post my actual measurements/pictures on here and leave the rest of the blurbs on my blog, rather than just putting it all on my blog. What do you think?

Many guys at dragondoor.com are on the warrior diet and might offer some guidance at your initial or adaptation stage.

For the first 3-6 months, I wasn’t allowing my body to have anything until the night time, which was a HUGE mistake. Especially since I was very active. So needles to say I lost alot of muscle. I still looked lean and cut, but definitely lost alot of mass. I started the diet soon after Ori’s interviews and was so intrigued that I ignored all of the major points.

It wasn’t until his first book finally came out, that I started to really understand what he was saying. I was also getting help from his wife who I contacted through the book. She guided me in many important things that were not mentioned in the first book, such as modifyng the diet if you were a “morning workout” person which at the time I was.

She was the one that said that juicing and small protein drinks throughout the day were very important for detoxifying and especially after a morning or evening workout. Night time was the time for the large COOKED meal that included carbs, cooked veggies and cooked proteins.

Finally, a few years later, the second book came out and was much more detailed and tailored towards all kinds of atheletes no matter when or how they trained. The book had more real science and suggestive meals that were allowed. Once I learned all of that, I applied everything and saw amazing results. I still do it today,but not every single day, I switch from the WD plan to a regular 6 meal a day plan just to keep my body guessing.

That’s the fascinating thing about our bodies. They adapt to EVERYTHING no matter what it is. So keep it guessing no matter what you end up doing.

[quote]T-Warrior wrote:
For the first 3-6 months, I wasn’t allowing my body to have anything until the night time, which was a HUGE mistake. Especially since I was very active. So needles to say I lost alot of muscle. I still looked lean and cut, but definitely lost alot of mass. I started the diet soon after Ori’s interviews and was so intrigued that I ignored all of the major points.

It wasn’t until his first book finally came out, that I started to really understand what he was saying. I was also getting help from his wife who I contacted through the book. She guided me in many important things that were not mentioned in the first book, such as modifyng the diet if you were a “morning workout” person which at the time I was.

She was the one that said that juicing and small protein drinks throughout the day were very important for detoxifying and especially after a morning or evening workout. Night time was the time for the large COOKED meal that included carbs, cooked veggies and cooked proteins.

Finally, a few years later, the second book came out and was much more detailed and tailored towards all kinds of atheletes no matter when or how they trained. The book had more real science and suggestive meals that were allowed. Once I learned all of that, I applied everything and saw amazing results. I still do it today,but not every single day, I switch from the WD plan to a regular 6 meal a day plan just to keep my body guessing.

That’s the fascinating thing about our bodies. They adapt to EVERYTHING no matter what it is. So keep it guessing no matter what you end up doing. [/quote]

T-Warrior,

I had a question regarding the morning workout. What did she suggest to eat after workouts in the morning? Do you eat a small meal or protein shake, then still have your big meal in the evening?

[quote]Faenon wrote:
I’ll also look into getting some calipers - any in particular that you’d recommend (preferably the cheapest you know of).[/quote]

These are the ones most people have:

They look flimsy, but are surprisingly accurate. I also bought the digital version they have, but ended up going back to these because they’re so easy and quick to use.

If you’re measuring your belly and neck circumference, you can estimate your BF% with the following formula from the Dept. of Defense (all measurements are in inches):

BF% = 86.010 x log10(abdomen - neck) - 70.041 x log10(height) + 36.76

Read the details to how to perform the measurements here:

It’s a lot more accurate than you’d imagine.

After my post I went to your blog and saw that you already knew all about the DoD BF equation :slight_smile:

Although I have to say that the article in about.com was a hell of a lot easier to read than the one on BB.com!

[quote]Faenon wrote:
Essentially, I’m looking to lose a lot of fat on this diet. I’ve never seen my abs in my life, and although doing cardio in preparation for rugby dropped down my fat levels enough so that I can sort of see them under the right lighting conditions and on an empty stomach, I can’t train at the moment so I want to try something else to get rid of that fat. [/quote]

  1. Do your parents support your plan?
  2. Is your primary care physician aware of your plan?

That second question is important because, at the age of 16, you’ve still got plenty of growing to do. At the very least, your hormone levels should be closely monitored by your doctor and you.

Miserere - Thanks for the caliper advice, I’ll try and get an order in right away. And yeah, the about.com article on body fat measurements is much easier to read than the BB.com one - I wish I’d known about the about.com one before, hahah.

[quote]chillain wrote:
Faenon wrote:
Essentially, I’m looking to lose a lot of fat on this diet. I’ve never seen my abs in my life, and although doing cardio in preparation for rugby dropped down my fat levels enough so that I can sort of see them under the right lighting conditions and on an empty stomach, I can’t train at the moment so I want to try something else to get rid of that fat.

  1. Do your parents support your plan?
  2. Is your primary care physician aware of your plan?

That second question is important because, at the age of 16, you’ve still got plenty of growing to do. At the very least, your hormone levels should be closely monitored by your doctor and you.

[/quote]

  1. Yes :slight_smile:
  2. Ummm, no… I didn’t really want to tell my family doctor about it because pretty much everyone who I tell about it freaks out and immediately goes, “THAT’S SUPER UNHEALTHY YOU’RE GONNA DIE!!!”, so I figured that’s what my doctor would do as well. However, you make a good point, so I’ll talk to my parents about getting my doctor in on this. Thanks for the advice.

T-Warrior - Do you have any advice on not losing mass, then? I don’t have a lot of mass right now (compared to the standards on here, at least), but I definitely have more than my base level. Also, I might try to have mass gain while still on this diet later on, so do you have any advice for that? Keep in mind, however, that I don’t have a lot of money to blow on supplements, unfortunately.

-Faenon

Ori’s wife mentioned that if one trained in the morning, Soon after, you had to consume a protein drink consisting of 25-40g of protein along with BCAA’s, glutamine, and a food based multi-vitamin supplement.

Basically along the same lines as what Poliquin suggests for post-workout nutrition. And after that, you should just continue with green juices,low glycemic fruits, and protein shakes of around 15-25g of protein throughout the day leaving the night time for your large cooked meal of meats,fishes starches veggies, etc.

Randomly eating shit tons of food irregularly (the Anabolic Diet is also guilty of this) with no consideration for your physiological state is just, well, stupid.

Must’ve missed the part in the AD book that says to eat a “shit ton of food irregularly.” Actually, it’s just a carb up, my friend, not a shit ton. Yes, most people freak and eat a lot the first few weekends, but that drops way off.

I also find it funny that you bash the AD, which I’ve been on essentially since '99, and I out weigh you by about 95lbs.

[quote]T-Warrior wrote:
Ori’s wife mentioned that if one trained in the morning, Soon after, you had to consume a protein drink consisting of 25-40g of protein along with BCAA’s, glutamine, and a food based multi-vitamin supplement.

Basically along the same lines as what Poliquin suggests for post-workout nutrition. And after that, you should just continue with green juices,low glycemic fruits, and protein shakes of around 15-25g of protein throughout the day leaving the night time for your large cooked meal of meats,fishes starches veggies, etc. [/quote]

Two questions: 1) Do they have to be protein drinks (thus requiring you to buy protein powder instead of real food) or can they be say, lean meat? 2) How often did she say to take these protein shakes?

Thanks,
-Faenon

ive done the diet before with some success. I did and do like the feeling of feeling like an instinctive hunter when training.

I had to eat a ton of BCAAs and take therms prior to working out.

every third day I had to train in the evening and follow my training with my evening meal making sure i got a large yam, or spagethi squash after my main meal.

I have since spoken to ori, and he likes a pre workout drink of whey and malto or something like Surge before and after
then small amounts of protein every few hours.
he also likes to eat eggs throughout the day, and some yogurt.

Its fun to do every now and then.

I agree with Faenon, too many “theorists” and not enough experiences.

I did the diet but I have a back ground in Exercise and Sports Science.

I DID notice that he repetitively mentions in his book that “athletes have further requirements”. Did our resident experts read that part?

I’ll refresh your memories Page 99 in a BIG GREY OUTLINED BOX!!!

For those therefore argueing baselessly against the diet, either you are blind, didn’t read the whole book or are purposefully trying to defame the man, or simply didn’t follow the diet to the Tee.

I didn’t lose an inch of Muscle. I actually gained Muscle and strength, endurance speed and aggressiveness. BUt hey, I read the book entirely and revisited parts many times. I practised it to a Tee but did as he said, modified it slightly throughout the day to meet my nutritional demands. That meant more grazing, more protein shakes and more water. Like derr.

But perhaps you need to also read pages 117, page 34 and the many other references he has for athletes outlining perfectly clearly why athletes need to modify the diet.

Or are you that scared of not honouring your psychological state of being with a robotic like eating plan that sees you as inefficient as the continuous feeding your needing?

Why is it that some people so call “need” to ingest gigantic amounts of protein per day where as others get by on much less amounts who are equally as active?

Have you any idea of the “blockages” you create with frequent feeding? The overstressed organs, especially digestive tract, hormone centres and receptor sites?

Why is it someone can ingest 120 grams of protein and grow and another supposedly needs 300 to “survive”?

It is because of this very concept of utilisation and efficiency that you suffer. Someone who’s system is so clogged needs more food, more protein and yes more carbs to effectuate proper enough nutrient absorption and hence you continue in this compounding yet downward spiraling inefficiency of digestion.

Most of you may have heard of the way some farmers “beef” up their cattle with deprivation days and then overfeeding days and the excellent results achieved. Well this is such a system but on a micro level of daily deprivation and overcompensation.

It is not merely about the muscle gain or look. It is also about creating the optimum healthy environment for living.

Hormones (except for insulin) do NOT work efficiently nor does the body release them when it is constantly being overfed with regular feedings. Do the research yourselves, fasted states are the best way to induce hormonal output. Fasted states and then training are even better ways. Science backs this up. IF your handy with journal research, then go for your life.

On the other hand if your happy to regurgitate magazine propoganda which promotes their bank balance, - Yes it is in the best interests of magazines to promote high protein, multiple feeding and copious amounts of supplements style programs which keep the advertisng companies paying up and glossing their magazine pages (notice how magazines have become supplement company turf wars?) - then go right ahead and hand over your hard earned money to people who are duping you.

But there are some really ignorant replies here that are obvious are merely opinionated replies not based on any facts. As mentioned, ORI DOES speak about athletes needs as being higher several times in the book but this is purposefully being ignored or left out to defame the program.

Have a little more honesty before you discourage people based on your personal whims.

The fact is, had you understood bodies and their constant battle for homeostasis then you’d realise the goal of eating is to promote homeostasis not destroy it with overfeeding style approaches.

[quote]Faenon wrote:

Two questions: 1) Do they have to be protein drinks (thus requiring you to buy protein powder instead of real food) or can they be say, lean meat? 2) How often did she say to take these protein shakes?

Thanks,
-Faenon[/quote]

Protein shakes ( read high quality ones preferably as raw as possible) are prefered because of their digestability ease as compared to your example of meat. The goal is to promote a “light” state throughout the day on the digestive tract and organs. The frequency of the shakes will depend on your goals and needs, activity and so on. An athlete who also works a very manual job will obviously need more feedings than a non-athlete.

If you are able to use a protein supplement, that would be better, since the body needs replenishment of nutrients as soon as possible with quick digestion and assimilation.

There are plenty of good quality protein powders out there that are not too expensive. Biotest’s Metabolic Drive or Whey of course is great.

I have also formulated my own with PROTEINFACTORY.COM.

If money is an issue,just use it on your workout days after you train and use small amounts of sugar free, nonfat yogurt or cottage cheese with juices and fruits throughout the rest of the day.

Honestly, when you calculate food costs, Most protein supplements tend to be cheaper than whole foods nowadays.
And as far as to how often, just do it various times a day depending on your daily physical activity. Make sure to drink lots of water which will help you with the hunger. I never really felt too hungry to the point of killing someone since I consumed plenty of water and green drinks all day long.

I did feel high though, and I wasn’t even taking any caffeine.

People practicing Ramadan eat in precisely the fashion described in the Warrior Diet.

I’ve no empirical observation on the matter, but the reports from the Muslims I hear on this matter (who don’t watch their macronutrients as carefully as the OP presumably does or Hofmekler certainly does) is that it’s not healthy, strictly religious and they end up gaining fat.

If you’re looking to lose fat, maybe you’d do better to check out the Velocity Diet? The reports seem to suggest that it poses a far more marginal threat to energy levels and muscle maintenance.