T Nation

Warped Plywood

I just bought some 3/4 inch CDX plywood to act as an underflooring for my home gym. Usually I will lay down two sheets of plywood with a 1/2 inch thick rubber mat on top. Problem is, the plywood warped. No a huge warp, but enough so that when I stand on the center you can hear and feel it compress. Not a problem when I deadlift, but if I clean or dumbbell snatch I can fell and hear it.

Is there anyway to flatten these bastards out without having to be replaced.

The easiest thing to do would probably be to lay your 45-lb plates flat on the plywood when you’re not using them. If it just keeps bouncing back to its original shape, try soaking the plywood in water and putting some really heavy shit on it until it dries. Then it should retain its shape. Just some ideas off the top of my head, hope it helps.

THANKS

THANKS

I thought that was the name of a band…Warped Plywood.

[quote]roadkill wrote:
The easiest thing to do would probably be to lay your 45-lb plates flat on the plywood when you’re not using them. If it just keeps bouncing back to its original shape, try soaking the plywood in water and putting some really heavy shit on it until it dries. Then it should retain its shape. Just some ideas off the top of my head, hope it helps.[/quote]

Sorry–this simply won’t work.

The only thing you can do now is screw the wood together. Get yourself some good decking screws and put in as many as you can. You’ll still probably have some of the warp effect, but because the wood is secured together, you won’t ‘feel’ it as much.

Now, if you can then secure both pieces to the floor, you’ll have your problem solved. But please, don’t soak your plywood in water.

ps–it goes without saying that you should invert your wood so as not to accentuate the warp.

Funny :))))

The easiest thing to do is get some screws across the center to push it in.

[quote]sasquatch wrote:

ps–it goes without saying that you should invert your wood so as not to accentuate the warp.[/quote]

For all you who don’t know, wood has grains. Those are the little lines that run through it. Most of the time this grain causes a piece of lumber to have a slightly hemispherical shape. “Inverting” it is to place the wood so that the concave side is facing out.

Orrrrr…

“And where were you when this happened?”

“We were inverted.”

Cough"Bullshit!"Cough

Plywood is made of layers of wood with opposing grains that have been bonded together. Hence the name ‘ply’ wood, referring to the number of layers it is made of. Therefore the grain of the wood is probably not the cause of the warping. My advice would be to screw it down if you can.